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Upgrade your Web browser!

Upgrade to IE9

Upgrade your browser!

You have ended up at this page because you're currently using Internet Explorer 6 (IE6) or Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) for browsing the Internet, and Lottery Post would like to inform you of the consequences of continuing to use that software, as well as the benefits you'll receive by upgrading to a modern Web browser.

We have taken great care in putting together this page, because of the importance we place on this issue.

The Problem

The Web is a fast-paced medium.  The coolest and most advanced sites of today may become tomorrow's dead wood in the blink of an eye.  Any Web site that does not continue to be upgraded and updated with the latest features and functionality will be overtaken by newer, better Web sites.

The same goes for the software on your PC that you use to view the Web sites.  If you don't periodically update your Web browsing software, you will gradually start to see that fewer and fewer Web sites work well on your PC.  That's because Web sites begin to use features that are only found in the latest Web browsers.

That's what's happening to Internet Explorer 6 these days.  That's what is happening to you.

IE6 was released in 2000, and back then it was the most advanced browser in the world.  Unfortunately it has not aged very well, and nowadays it has several serious problems.  Its security model is severely flawed, and its support for CSS and JavaScript, the languages that make Web sites behave as you want them to behave, is seriously outdated.

One of the most horrendous security breaches in IE6 is that it exposes your Windows Clipboard to every Web site you visit.  (For those who don't know what a Clipboard is, it's the holding area in your computer that stores the text when you click "Copy" or "Cut" — it's where the text comes from when you click "Paste".)

Don't believe it?  Click here, and I'll show you what's on your clipboard right now.  (IE7 users will see a warning message, but IE6 users have no control over the release of the data.)  If you use IE6, I hope you don't ever copy and paste anything that you don't want the world to see!

As a result of all the problems inherent in IE6, you'll encounter more and more problems and security issues as time goes by; problems that are caused not by the Web sites you're visiting, but by the browser you're using: IE6 or IE7.

Solution

Fortunately the solution to this problem is quite simple: download and install a newer, better browser.  It's free, it just takes a few minutes, and you only have to do it once in order to browse the Web safely and pleasantly for years to come.

Most Web modern browsers will automatically look to see if updates are available, so once you install your new browser, it should be able to keep itself up-to-date.

Windows 98 and Window ME Users

If you are a user of Windows 98 or Windows ME, you have fewer options than everyone else because your operating system is so old, and you are not able to upgrade to IE9.  However, you can still get away from old versions of Internet Explorer, and use a safe, modern Web browser.

You have two options: either upgrade to a more recent version of Windows (at least Windows XP), or upgrade to a non-IE Web browser.

The best solution is to upgrade your operating system, because Microsoft no longer supports Windows 98 and Windows ME, and you are taking severe risks by continuing to use such an old version of Windows.  The primary risk is that a hacker can very easily penetrate your computer and disrupt it, or steal your personal information, or turn your computer into a "zombie" (a computer that silently sends out thousands of spam e-mails a day or is used as a robot to disrupt other computers).  Modern versions of Windows continue to be patched by Microsoft to prevent such intrusions, but your version of Windows is no longer patched by Microsoft.

Windows XP is a good upgrade option for those with older computers (as opposed to Windows 7 or Windows Vista), because it does not require a very powerful computer.  You can purchase an upgrade to Windows XP from Amazon.com: Windows XP Home Edition Upgrade (probably the best option for you), or you can get the Windows XP Professional Edition Upgrade (provides additional features such as the Encrypting File System).

If you do not wish to upgrade to a newer version of Windows, your other option is to install a non-IE Web browser — there are still a few modern Web browsers that work with your version of Windows.

Please see Windows 98 and Window ME: Getting the best possible experience for a very detailed explanation of your Web browser options, along with an easy-to-use installation guide.

Everyone else: Upgrading is simple

Upgrade to IE9

We have put together a comprehensive list of alternatives for you to choose from.  At the very least, you need to upgrade Internet Explorer to version 9, and then you have the option of adding other browsers, if you wish.  Getting IE6 and IE7 off of your computer will instantly improve the security and stability of your system.

So, follow the instructions for upgrading to IE9, and then after that is accomplished, you may also consider installing one or more of the other browsers too.  It does no harm to install multiple Web browsers on your computer, and in fact will let you try them out to see if you like them better.

Any browser can be easily uninstalled (with the exception of IE, which is part of Windows), so there is no harm in installing as many of them as you like.

When the new browser has been installed you can start surfing the Web with it.  You may have to log in to sites you use; your new browser will not have the information about your passwords that your old IE6 or IE7 contains.

Don't be discouraged if your initially find your new browser a little disorienting.  That will definitely pass soon, as you discover that browsers have gotten a lot better — and faster — since the days of IE6 and IE7!

•  •  •  •  •

  • Microsoft's Internet Explorer 9, the latest version from Microsoft, and wide-ranging compatibility with Windows 7 and Windows Vista.  Regardless of whichever other Web browsers you may install, this upgrade should be considered mandatory, for security purposes.

    Installing IE9:

    1. Go to the Internet Explorer Home page.
    2. Click the Download Now button.  If a pop-over opens displaying another Download button, just go ahead and click that button.
    3. When it asks "Do you want to run or save this file?" answer Run.  The download will begin, and the installation will begin immediately after the download is complete.  While the installation program is downloading, you may notice that your Web browser has navigated to a page showing the upcoming installation steps.  Feel free to get your assistance for the next steps from that page, since it is always kept up-to-date by Microsoft.
    4. Now the installation program will ask you some questions.  In general you should opt for the default installation (unless you know what you're doing).  Usually your new browser will ask you if it should import your favorites; say Yes so that your favorite sites will be available on your new browser.
    5. You may be asked to restart your computer.  Do so.

    Keeping IE9 updated:

    After installing IE9, be sure that you have Windows Update set to automatically download and install recommended Windows updates.  These updates will include IE9 updates and patches that get released over time.

    If Windows Update is not running on your computer, either because it is disabled or because you don't leave your computer on overnight, run Windows Update manually every couple weeks.  It is located in the Windows Start menu (you may have to click "All Programs" to see it).

  • Firefox 3

    Installing Firefox 3:

    1. Go to the download page for Firefox.
    2. Click the Free Download button.
    3. When it asks "Do you want to run or save this file?" answer Run.  The download will begin, and the installation will begin immediately after the download is complete.
    4. Now the installation program will ask you some questions.  In general you should opt for the default installation (unless you know what you're doing).  Usually your new browser will ask you if it should import your favorites; say Yes so that your favorite sites will be available on your new browser.
    5. If you want to continue using IE9 as your main browser, be sure to un-check the checkbox during installation that prompts, "Set this as your default browser".  It's not a disaster if you overlook this step, but it saves you some manual configuration effort later.

    Keeping Firefox updated:

    Every time you start the Firefox browser, it silently checks to see if a new update is available.  (Firefox also checks to see if any of your browser add-ons need updating.)  If it finds an update, Firefox asks you if you want to install the update.

    If you answer "Yes", that you want to install the update(s), the installation will occur instantly and without any action on your part.  Firefox will automatically close and re-open, and then you're ready to browse the Internet.

    You can also manually check for updates by clicking "Check for Updates..." in the Help menu.

  • Chrome, by Google

    Installing Chrome:

    1. Go to the download page for Chrome.
    2. Click the Download Google Chrome button.  On the next page click the Accept and Install button.
    3. When you receive the next prompt, click the Run button.  The download will begin, and the installation will begin immediately after the download is complete.
    4. Now the installation program will ask you some questions.  In general you should opt for the default installation (unless you know what you're doing).  Usually your new browser will ask you if it should import your favorites; say Yes so that your favorite sites will be available on your new browser.
    5. If you want to continue using IE9 as your main browser, be sure to un-check any boxes during installation that prompt, "Set this as your default browser".  It's not a disaster if you don't do this, but it saves you a step later.

    Keeping Chrome updated:

    The Google Chrome browser will generally check for you to see if a new update is available.  However, you can also manually check very easily by clicking the "wrench" icon in the Chrome toolbar and then selecting "About Google Chrome" from the menu.  At the bottom of the About box you will see a message indicating if an update is available.  If so, it will provide an option to install the update.

  • Opera

    Installing Opera:

    1. Go to the download page for Opera.
    2. Click the Download button.
    3. When it asks "Do you want to run or save this file?" answer Run.  The download will begin, and the installation will begin immediately after the download is complete.
    4. Now the installation program will ask you some questions.  In general you should opt for the default installation (unless you know what you're doing).  Usually your new browser will ask you if it should import your favorites; say Yes so that your favorite sites will be available on your new browser.
    5. If you want to continue using IE9 as your main browser, be sure to un-check any boxes during installation that prompt, "Set this as your default browser".  It's not a disaster if you don't do this, but it saves you a step later.

    Keeping Opera updated:

    Every time you start the Opera browser, it silently checks to see if a new update is available.  If it finds an update, Opera asks you if you want to install the update.

    If you answer "Yes", that you want to install the update(s), the installation will occur instantly and without any action on your part.  Opera will automatically close and re-open, and then you're ready to browse the Internet.

    You can also manually check for updates by clicking "Check for Updates" in the Help menu.

  • Safari, by Apple

    Installing Safari:

    1. Go to the download page for Safari.
    2. Click the Download button next to the latest version of Safari for your Operating System.
    3. When it asks "Do you want to run or save this file?" answer Run.  The download will begin, and the installation will begin immediately after the download is complete.
    4. Now the installation program will ask you some questions.  In general you should opt for the default installation (unless you know what you're doing).  Usually your new browser will ask you if it should import your favorites; say Yes so that your favorite sites will be available on your new browser.
    5. If you want to continue using IE9 as your main browser, be sure to un-check any boxes during installation that prompt, "Set this as your default browser".  It's not a disaster if you don't do this, but it saves you a step later.

    Keeping Safari updated:

    The Safari installation program installs a program on your computer called "Apple Software Update".  This software will periodically search for the existence of new updates, and will prompt you if it finds any.

    One thing to be careful about: the Apple Software Update will show both updates and new software that you have not yet loaded.  Do not rush to click the Install button before you consider each software option.  Updates you should always install, but new software should be a considered decision.

    You can also manually run the Apple Software Update from the Windows Start menu (Windows users).

•  •  •  •  •

The process of upgrading your Web browser requires about five minutes of your attention.  During the download you can continue working on other things while it downloads in the background; it's only during installation that you really have to stop what you're doing and wait for your computer to finish.

If your computer uses a broadband Internet connection, the download times will be a very short delay.

Happy browsing with your new browser!