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Ohio Gov. plans lottery expansion to increase revenues

Ohio LotteryOhio Lottery: Ohio Gov. plans lottery expansion to increase revenues

Gov. Ted Strickland's plan to boost Ohio's struggling economy anticipates $73 million in new revenue from an expansion of the lottery, which includes a video version of Keno to be offered in bars and other age-controlled venues.

The governor said he distinguishes the new games from the video gambling machines outlawed in 2007 because they will be "state-monitored, state-controlled and state-regulated." His spokesman, Keith Dailey, said the Keno game is much different from video slot machines outlawed in 2007, because numbers are selected in the fashion of other lottery games and winners are displayed on a video monitor.

"It's not like Tic Tac Fruit, where you sit in front of the machine all day pumping in quarters," he said.

Diane Howard, an employee of the Golden Penny Skilled Gaming Arcade in Newark, said re-introducing cash gaming machines — even if they were state-issued — would be a boon for a business struggling since the cash-prize machines were outlawed.

The arcade now operates on a prize redemption system, where customers trade in tickets for prizes instead of receiving cash.

She estimated business is down about 40 percent since they switched to prize redemption.

"I think they should have (the machines)," she said. "I don't think it's hurting anyone."

Wes Haberman, of Granville, said the machines could generate cash that normally flows out of state, adding Ohio should establish its own casinos if the machines are being considered.

"I wish they would have casinos in Ohio so people wouldn't drive to West Virginia," he said.

Matthew Castle, of Newark, said the government should more closely analyze the economy before taking action.

"I think (the lottery expansion) is a false solution. I think we need to look at what's really wrong with the economy," he said. "It just seems more or less that it's a diversion tactic."

Strickland said he can make the lottery changes without legislative approval, but he needs their help to enact many of the other proposals.

U.S. Sen. George Voinovich, a former Republican governor of the state, also disagreed with the Strickland administration's characterization of the games — suggesting that adding the game goes against the wishes of Ohioans who have voted against expanded gambling proposals three times.

"This is in no way an expansion of the lottery," he said. "From a public policy standpoint, I urge the Legislature to reject this idea and do what I did when I was governor in this situation, which was to work harder and smarter and do more with less. This would be a foot in the door for full-blown gambling and, once that happens, Katie bar the door."

State Rep. Jay Hottinger said that should be reason for speculation.

"They said that's something they can do without legislative authority," Hottinger said. "At first glimpse, I'd have to question that.

"Expansion of gambling and the lottery is a contentious issue. Government should derive revenue from people's strengths, not (their) weaknesses. But, even if it's included, I don't know how that solves the (deficit) problem."

Newark Advocate

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3 comments. Last comment 6 years ago by PEACHIE10.
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United States
Member #10720
January 23, 2005
932 Posts
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Posted: February 2, 2008, 8:22 pm - IP Logged

One burning question, are these things going to be computerized? A "video version" of anything sounds like it would be. Can we be sure the program would draw fairly and not exclude some combinations i.e. the programmer puts the upper limit at "60" instead of "70" or "80" numbers? I'd steer clear of them.

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    Kentucky
    United States
    Member #32652
    February 14, 2006
    5284 Posts
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    Posted: February 3, 2008, 9:50 am - IP Logged

    One burning question, are these things going to be computerized? A "video version" of anything sounds like it would be. Can we be sure the program would draw fairly and not exclude some combinations i.e. the programmer puts the upper limit at "60" instead of "70" or "80" numbers? I'd steer clear of them.

    When I heard the news the other day, it sounded like the standard video keno machines that most casinos have. If it's a state wide drawing every 5 minutes than of course it will be computerized; just like in Michigan and West Virginia.

      PEACHIE10's avatar - Lottery-009.jpg
      New Member
      MANSFIELD
      United States
      Member #47555
      November 11, 2006
      18 Posts
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      Posted: February 4, 2008, 10:46 pm - IP Logged

      Lottery Expansion

      I for one cant understand how the lottery can just keep adding more games ,YES OHIO DID VOTE FOR THE LOTTERY IN 1979 ,AND SINCE THEY JUST KEEP ADDING GAMES AND TAKING MONEY ,WHAT is the difference between lotteries,bingo,and casinos.

      HAS ANYONE EVER JUST OF JUST HOW MANY PEOPLE THAT TRAVEL TO VEGAS ON A DAILY BASIS FROM CLE.COL. CINN. DAYTON, NOT COUNTING THE BUS TRIPS TO MICH. WVA AND PA ,THERE ARE ALWAYS A FULL PLANE ,ON EVERY FLIGHTAND USUALLY 4-5 FLIGHTS A DAY,NOW GO FIGURE THAT EACH PERSON HAS A 1000.00 TO GAMBLE WITH AT THE MIN.THATS A LOT OF MONEY LEAVING OHIO AND I FOR 1 IS ONE OF THEM AND SO IS MY HUSBAND  WE TRAVEL TO VEGAS 4 TIMES A YEAR.SO WAKE UP OHIO AND GO FIGURE WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN Lotteries and casinos.Coffee

      Banana