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Nevada Assembly passes lottery bill

NevadaNevada: Nevada Assembly passes lottery bill

Senate vote is next step

CARSON CITY, Nev. — The Nevada Assembly voted Wednesday for a lottery in the nation's No. 1 gambling state, despite arguments that it would compete with slot machines and other games of chance.

AJR7 is the latest version of a plan that since the 1970s has failed about two dozen times to win legislative approval. The measure advanced on a 31-11 vote and now moves to the Senate.

The plan would have to be approved by lawmakers this year and again in 2011 and then go to a public vote.

"It's time to have the people in Nevada decide whether or not they want a lottery," said Assemblyman Paul Aizley, D-Las Vegas, the sponsor of the plan.

Opponents included Assembly Minority Leader Heidi Gansert, R-Reno, who said, "If there was ever a time for a lottery, I would say this is not the time. Our gaming industries in this state our hemorrhaging."

"They're such a large industry in this state, and I would hate to cannibalize them."

Assemblyman Ty Cobb, R-Reno, added that casinos have already been hit by the economic downturn and by a state smoking ban that went into effect in 2006.

"A lot of the small tavern owners and those types of operations are really hurting right now in this economy," Cobb said.

But proponents of AJR7 said lawmakers should consider any way to raise revenue.

"I am so frustrated because I hear day after day about our inability to fund our education system," said Assemblywoman Debbie Smith, D-Sparks, adding that she hears from many constituents who support the idea to bring money to "woefully underfunded" education.

"I want to give the voters in my district and this state the opportunity to have this choice."

Assemblywoman Kathy McClain, D-Las Vegas, said that polls show that 70 percent of the public supports the idea of a state lottery.

Lotteries are operated in all but eight states now, and experts on such games estimate that Americans spent $57 billion on lottery tickets in 2006 alone-with no more than 2 percent of any of the ticket sales going into any state's coffers. The rest of the money went to pay for prizes and other expenses.

"We've heard over and over ... that the most lucrative place that California sells their lottery tickets is on the Nevada border," said Assemblywoman Peggy Pierce, D-Las Vegas.

"I have a lottery ticket in my pocket," she said, adding, "Wish me luck tonight."

AP

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4 comments. Last comment 5 years ago by Stack47.
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Northern California
United States
Member #19948
August 9, 2005
146 Posts
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Posted: April 17, 2009, 12:28 pm - IP Logged

I wish they would quit using the "no more than 2 percent of any of the ticket sales going into any states coffers" line. That line is at best, a very poorly structured attempt to quote statistics the original author did not understand - EVERY state lottery, including the payout leader, MA, turns over way more than 2% of sales as net profits. <deep breath>

 

I'm ambivalent about it. Why shouldn't Nevadans have access to state sanctioned/operated games? Its not like they don't have all sorts of legalized gambling, and even prostitution, etc., already.

 

Would the lottery cannibalize existing gaming?  Yes.

 

Would the lottery generate some incremental gaming revenues?  Yes

 

If they were smart, they run a statewide Keno game in all the bars with really high payouts, along with high-payout Scratch tickets. They also need to pick a great beneficiary so people will know that even when they lose (which, lets face it, is most of the time) "society" and their friends & neighbors, still see a benefit.

 

Just my 2 cents.

    Avatar
    Entertaiment Capital
    United States
    Member #37800
    April 19, 2006
    302 Posts
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    Posted: April 18, 2009, 12:25 am - IP Logged

     This is interesting. A big percentage of casino patrons in LV are the residents. I wonder how the NV lotteries will work out. If the tourists are to buy the tickets, will tourists stay for a few days to wait for the lottery result?

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      Marquette, MI
      United States
      Member #20541
      August 20, 2005
      492 Posts
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      Posted: April 23, 2009, 9:45 pm - IP Logged

      Maybe if they do have one they will be really creative with their games to attract sales.
      They could lead the country in great games.

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        Kentucky
        United States
        Member #32652
        February 14, 2006
        5512 Posts
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        Posted: April 24, 2009, 10:29 pm - IP Logged

         This is interesting. A big percentage of casino patrons in LV are the residents. I wonder how the NV lotteries will work out. If the tourists are to buy the tickets, will tourists stay for a few days to wait for the lottery result?

        The new Nevada Lottery will probably join either Powerball or Mega Millions and many of the residents will play. Most of us forget Nevada isn't the only state with casino gambling; just the only one of them without a lottery.

        The lottery might affect the casino revenues in smaller cities because more of the players are locals but in cities like Vegas and Reno that depend on out of state gamblers, the lottery should have little or no affect on their revenues.