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Court hears arguments on $559M lottery winner's plea to remain anonymous

Topic closed. 81 replies. Last post 3 years ago by jacintasc.

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KY Floyd's avatar - lysol avatar.jpg
NY
United States
Member #23834
October 16, 2005
4266 Posts
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"Who remembers past jackpot winners?"

People who want their money. Especially people who want their money and aren't overly fussy about how they get it.

"so many hints as to who is person is"

If you think you've seen useful clues about who she is I've got a bridge that I'll sell you for cheap. Her lawyer knows the law isn't on her side so he's doing his best to win with BS. "The Good Karma Family Trust"? You need some pretty high boots to wade through the pile he's offering up. For the claim about being active in the community to be true all that's necessary is going to church on Easter or voting in a school board election. Or maybe even just getting some exercise in the community.

"the town she lives in"

What makes you think you know where she lives? Based on everything I've read the lottery hasn't even seen the ticket yet. Even if they have they haven't released any information. That means the only thing we know is where the ticket was sold. For all we know the winner is a man who live 40 miles away, and decided that it would be advantageous to self-identify as a woman for a while.

"if just one Judge realizes how such a major win can impact a persons life"

That's completely irrelevant. The legal argument is about releasing the winner's name as indicated by the name signed on the ticket, or releasing the name of a different legal entity that the prize is assigned to. The judge has to rule based on the law, and the law seems to be very clear. Based on the argument that the ticket can't be altered and is a public document I don't even see any wiggle room for a ruling that the name of the trust is functionally equivalent to the name of the actual person in terms of identifying the winner.

I had considered that the lottery might try to help her out by offering a barely adequate defense against the lawsuit, but it now appears that they're going for the win. That means that on the off chance the judge doesn't offer a sound legal argument that fits within the law we can expect an appeal.

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    United States
    Member #170703
    December 13, 2015
    202 Posts
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    I have a solution.

     

    I will gladly change my name to hers and claim the prize. I will also be glad to be photographed as I spend MY millions. And she can change her name to mine and lead the private life she desires.

      Avatar
      Simpsonville
      United States
      Member #163184
      January 22, 2015
      2289 Posts
      Offline

      "Who remembers past jackpot winners?"

      People who want their money. Especially people who want their money and aren't overly fussy about how they get it.

      "so many hints as to who is person is"

      If you think you've seen useful clues about who she is I've got a bridge that I'll sell you for cheap. Her lawyer knows the law isn't on her side so he's doing his best to win with BS. "The Good Karma Family Trust"? You need some pretty high boots to wade through the pile he's offering up. For the claim about being active in the community to be true all that's necessary is going to church on Easter or voting in a school board election. Or maybe even just getting some exercise in the community.

      "the town she lives in"

      What makes you think you know where she lives? Based on everything I've read the lottery hasn't even seen the ticket yet. Even if they have they haven't released any information. That means the only thing we know is where the ticket was sold. For all we know the winner is a man who live 40 miles away, and decided that it would be advantageous to self-identify as a woman for a while.

      "if just one Judge realizes how such a major win can impact a persons life"

      That's completely irrelevant. The legal argument is about releasing the winner's name as indicated by the name signed on the ticket, or releasing the name of a different legal entity that the prize is assigned to. The judge has to rule based on the law, and the law seems to be very clear. Based on the argument that the ticket can't be altered and is a public document I don't even see any wiggle room for a ruling that the name of the trust is functionally equivalent to the name of the actual person in terms of identifying the winner.

      I had considered that the lottery might try to help her out by offering a barely adequate defense against the lawsuit, but it now appears that they're going for the win. That means that on the off chance the judge doesn't offer a sound legal argument that fits within the law we can expect an appeal.

      KY Floyd...an excellent post, best one I've read so far!

       

      My thought was way before any of this when it said NH won was that someone crossed the border from Massachusetts and had the winning ticket.  Many New Hampshire residents have won big time on Mass. scratch tickets.  That's what provoked my thought process that maybe the winners were reversed.

       

      You are correct, I think, that she may not be from that town.  Look how many times truckers drive through states and won lotteries.

       

      $8 won on PB last night, and $26 on KY Cashball 225, good thing, my balance was zero!

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        New York
        United States
        Member #103596
        January 4, 2011
        6510 Posts
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        If she had just claimed her money it would be done with. Who remembers past jackpot winners? Frankly, most winners that had bad things happen to them was the result of already hanging around bad characters, or blabbing themselves of winning a jackpot.

        I find it kind of funny that the more she fights this, the more notoriety she's bringing on herself, especially if she loses the case.

        "Who remembers past jackpot winners?" Those that would do a winner harm, try to scam them, get a piece of the winnings through nefarious means, etc.  There are plenty of stories of winners being harmed in various ways, even being killed solely as a result of a win (some for large amounts and some for more modest amounts). I'd venture to say that there are tens of thousands of attempts to contact winners of a prize of this size- all those people remember the winner (not for a minute, a day, months, a year- they remember forever).

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          New York
          United States
          Member #103596
          January 4, 2011
          6510 Posts
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          "Who remembers past jackpot winners?"

          People who want their money. Especially people who want their money and aren't overly fussy about how they get it.

          "so many hints as to who is person is"

          If you think you've seen useful clues about who she is I've got a bridge that I'll sell you for cheap. Her lawyer knows the law isn't on her side so he's doing his best to win with BS. "The Good Karma Family Trust"? You need some pretty high boots to wade through the pile he's offering up. For the claim about being active in the community to be true all that's necessary is going to church on Easter or voting in a school board election. Or maybe even just getting some exercise in the community.

          "the town she lives in"

          What makes you think you know where she lives? Based on everything I've read the lottery hasn't even seen the ticket yet. Even if they have they haven't released any information. That means the only thing we know is where the ticket was sold. For all we know the winner is a man who live 40 miles away, and decided that it would be advantageous to self-identify as a woman for a while.

          "if just one Judge realizes how such a major win can impact a persons life"

          That's completely irrelevant. The legal argument is about releasing the winner's name as indicated by the name signed on the ticket, or releasing the name of a different legal entity that the prize is assigned to. The judge has to rule based on the law, and the law seems to be very clear. Based on the argument that the ticket can't be altered and is a public document I don't even see any wiggle room for a ruling that the name of the trust is functionally equivalent to the name of the actual person in terms of identifying the winner.

          I had considered that the lottery might try to help her out by offering a barely adequate defense against the lawsuit, but it now appears that they're going for the win. That means that on the off chance the judge doesn't offer a sound legal argument that fits within the law we can expect an appeal.

          Posted my response before reading further and seeing this post. You obviously are knowledgeable. Do you think because the NH Lottery posted instructions on their website as to what actions a winner should take that they were in some way providing legal guidance and assuming a role that they should not have could possibly factor into a positive outcome for the winner? This is the only avenue I can fathom would have any shot but I am not in the legal field. Thanks.

            rcbbuckeye's avatar - Lottery-062.jpg
            Texas
            United States
            Member #55887
            October 23, 2007
            10477 Posts
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            Posted my response before reading further and seeing this post. You obviously are knowledgeable. Do you think because the NH Lottery posted instructions on their website as to what actions a winner should take that they were in some way providing legal guidance and assuming a role that they should not have could possibly factor into a positive outcome for the winner? This is the only avenue I can fathom would have any shot but I am not in the legal field. Thanks.

            There are probably a few that would try to scam or harm a winner for their money.

            Again, people that got into trouble after winning a jackpot are usually ones that couldn't keep quiet, that blabbed about it, and, or hung out with a bad crowd of "friends".

            Yes, if I won a huge jackpot, I would claim anonymously. But, before Texas changed the law, I certainly wouldn't have been afraid to claim a jackpot with people finding out about it. It's being smart and not going out of my way to attract attention to myself.

            To each...his own.

            CAN'T WIN IF YOU'RE NOT IN

            A DOLLAR AND A DREAM (OR $2)

              zephbe's avatar - animal butterfly.jpg
              South Carolina
              United States
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              July 15, 2009
              897 Posts
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              Suppose it is not 'her' ticket.  Suppose it is a lottery pool ticket and she doesn't want to share.  Something about this case isn't right.  She can get the money and move.  She's making too much fuss about something that could have been over.

              Every champion was once a contender who refused to give up.-Rocky Balboa

              “Don’t let someone who gave up on their dreams talk you out of going after yours.” – Zig Ziglar

                CDanaT's avatar - Nolz june15.jpg
                Central TN
                United States
                Member #121189
                January 4, 2012
                4777 Posts
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                There are probably a few that would try to scam or harm a winner for their money.

                Again, people that got into trouble after winning a jackpot are usually ones that couldn't keep quiet, that blabbed about it, and, or hung out with a bad crowd of "friends".

                Yes, if I won a huge jackpot, I would claim anonymously. But, before Texas changed the law, I certainly wouldn't have been afraid to claim a jackpot with people finding out about it. It's being smart and not going out of my way to attract attention to myself.

                To each...his own.

                I Agree!

                Caution and Discretion:

                Simple words to consider, difficult for some to follow.

                Integrity: There is just no substitute.

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                  United States
                  Member #170703
                  December 13, 2015
                  202 Posts
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                  Is Todd monitoring these threads? Because I have a question. There are true anonymous states. And then there are states that allow to "claim anonymously". There is a difference in a true anonymous state which is state law and a lottery commission that allowed the winners name not to be published.

                   

                  I hope someone out there understands what I am saying. Because California allowed a winner to claim anonymously in the past, but it is NOT a anonymous state. It has to do with state law.

                   

                  So Todd, can you publish the TRUE anonymous states? Thank you.

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                    United States
                    Member #164719
                    March 12, 2015
                    1300 Posts
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                    Did the guy who was murdered in front of his kids in Atlanta go out of his way to attract attention? I dont think so. He won about $400k plus which wasnt enough for him to quit his job and move. 

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                      Chasing $ Millions.
                      White Shores- California
                      United States
                      Member #136473
                      December 12, 2012
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                      Suppose it is not 'her' ticket.  Suppose it is a lottery pool ticket and she doesn't want to share.  Something about this case isn't right.  She can get the money and move.  She's making too much fuss about something that could have been over.

                      " Not her ticket, doesn't want to share with the rest of the lottery pool? " How do you spell extremely unlikely. The idea that the other members of the pool would be silent, while this circus goes about it's business is...

                       * Voice of Reason *   

                       

                      People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it- George Bernard Shaw.

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                        Kentucky
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                        February 14, 2006
                        8999 Posts
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                        " Not her ticket, doesn't want to share with the rest of the lottery pool? " How do you spell extremely unlikely. The idea that the other members of the pool would be silent, while this circus goes about it's business is...

                        The assumption is Ms Doe never gave them copies of their tickets. And that's a much better explanation than "She doesn't want to be a celebrity,"

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                          Chasing $ Millions.
                          White Shores- California
                          United States
                          Member #136473
                          December 12, 2012
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                          The assumption is Ms Doe never gave them copies of their tickets. And that's a much better explanation than "She doesn't want to be a celebrity,"

                          That would make for a good movie script Stack, but all will be revealed in time.

                          I have to dig through the archives of my memory, but there was an incident many years ago here in CA, where the wife suddenly decided that she was not in love with her husband of 25 years anymore, so she left and never returned. Well one day a letter comes in the mail from the lottery office asking for particulars about her new mail box etc, the husband forwards the letter to he's attorney & the next thing you know, both the husband and the wife are in court over a " lottery win." To the best of my knowledge, the judge threw the book at the wife, calling her deceitful & an evil person, awarded him the entire jackpot win... community of property bud.

                          Then there was the case of that Latino guy from NY or NJ a few years back who suppposedly won the jackpot ALONE  despite him always playing along with the job pool.He too got nailed by the courts. It's risky behavior, and if you correct, the public that is siding with her at present, will turn on her in a NY minute... that's a fact Stack.

                           * Voice of Reason *   

                           

                          People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it- George Bernard Shaw.

                            KY Floyd's avatar - lysol avatar.jpg
                            NY
                            United States
                            Member #23834
                            October 16, 2005
                            4266 Posts
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                            "because the NH Lottery posted instructions on their website as to what actions a winner should  ..."

                            I don't think that's a great argument. At least not a great legal argument. I'm not even sure that the NH lottery says anything that matters much. A Google search of the NH Lottery website for the phrase "sign the ticket" turns up one result on the page about claiming prizes, and a few on news pages about winners. The news pages have a list offering several pieces of advice. The first is "Sign the ticket—the New Hampshire Lottery only pays the person who signs the back of the ticket." #3 is to talk to a lawyer, and #4 is to talk to a financial planner. The one on the page about how to claim a prize only has the requirement to sign the ticket in the section about claiming by mail.

                            Personally, I think that talking to a lawyer and financial planner should be among your very first steps, and as everyone should know, her lawyer would have told her not to sign her name. And notice that the advice doesn't say to sign your name - it only says to sign the ticket. Remember Mitt Romney a few years back? "Corporations are people, my friend." As everyone who has read the stories about this should know, the ticket can be signed with the name of a legal entity created to manage the prize, and/or by a representative of that entity.

                            As an interesting aside, the 2nd suggestion is to move the NH, since the prize won't be subject to state income tax. In the past I figured that the ticket became valuable the moment that winning numbers matching the ticket are certified, but I've since reached the conclusion that the doctrine of economic benefit means that the ticket only becomes valuable at some point after it's validated. That means that as a NY resident, if I buy a ticket while in NH and it wins a significant prize I can become a NH resident before claiming the prize, and pay 0% in state income tax instead of the 8.82% for NY's top bracket. That's about $31 million for the prize won by Jane Doe. Unlike some people, I don't  consider the advice from a state lottery to be legal advice that can be relied on, but it's still interesting to see that advice offered.

                            "Suppose it is not 'her' ticket."

                            So what's your theory? That she bought the ticket on behalf of a pool and none of the other members knows what numbers were played? It's possible, but life is should to be more difficult when you're stupid. And if they're all so stupid that they also don't know that the tickets were bought in Merrimack and that they might want to check things out just in case, then perhaps they should be removed from the gene pool before they breed even more stupid people.

                              zephbe's avatar - animal butterfly.jpg
                              South Carolina
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                              Member #77165
                              July 15, 2009
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                              " Not her ticket, doesn't want to share with the rest of the lottery pool? " How do you spell extremely unlikely. The idea that the other members of the pool would be silent, while this circus goes about it's business is...

                              Some people don't give copies of the ticket(s) to pool members.

                              http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/13/news/powerball-office-pool/index.html

                              Every champion was once a contender who refused to give up.-Rocky Balboa

                              “Don’t let someone who gave up on their dreams talk you out of going after yours.” – Zig Ziglar