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Beware Lottery Scam!

Topic closed. 7 replies. Last post 11 years ago by goldrush.

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Australia
Member #17096
June 11, 2005
225 Posts
Offline
Posted: May 27, 2006, 12:37 am - IP Logged

I got this email today. It's a total scam, it's not from the UK Lottery.

 

 


 
The National Lottery Logo                                                         
UK NATIONAL LOTTERY HEADQUARTERS:
 P O Box 1010 Liverpool,
 L70 1NL UNITED KINGDOM
(Customer Services)

FROM: UNITED KINGDOM NATIONAL LOTTERY:
WINNING NOTICE FOR CATEGORY "A" WINNER

BONUS LOTTERY PROMOTION PRIZE AWARDS WINNING NOTIFICATION

Dear Lucky Winner,

We are pleased to inform you of the result of the just concluded annual final draws of UNITED KINGDOM NATIONAL LOTTERY international Lottery programs. The online cyber lotto draws was conducted from an exclusive list of 21,000 e-mail addresses of individual and corporate bodies picked by an advanced automated random computer search from the internet, no tickets were sold. After this automated computer ballot, your e-mail address emerged as one of two winners in the category "A" with the following winning information:

REF No: UK/9420X2/68
BATCH No: 074/05/ZY369
TICKET No: 20511465463-7644
SERIAL No: S/N-00168
LUCKY No: 887-13-865-37-10-83

You as well as the other winner are therefore to receive a cash prize of £1,000,000 (One million pounds sterling) each from the total payout. Your prize award has been insured with your e-mail address and will be transferred to you upon meeting our requirements, statutory obligations, verifications, validations and satisfactory report. To begin the claims processing of your prize winnings you are advised to contact our licensed and accredited claims agent for category "A" winners with the information below:

To file for your claim, please contact the processing agent;

Mr. Terry Davis.
Tell: +44-702-406-5874
Fax: +44-707-502-0632

Remember to quote your reference information in all correspondence. You are to keep all lotto information away from the general public especially your reference and ticket numbers. (This is important as a case of double claims will not be entertained). Anybody under the age of 17 and members of the affiliate agencies are automatically not allowed to participate in this program. Please note; You are hereby advice to send the asign fiduciary Agent details below for Processing of your Claims;

(1) FULL NAME
(2) FULL ADDRESS
(3) NATIONALITY
(4) COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE
(5) AGE
(6) OCCUPATION
(7) WINNING EMAIL
(8) TELEPHONE NUMBER
(9) FAX NUMBER
(10)DATE OF WINNING NOTIFICATION
(11)SEX
(12)TOTAL AMOUNT WON
(13)MARITAL STATUS

Reply to this confidential email account: terrydavis_ukonlineagent@yahoo.co.ukCongratulations once more from our members of staff and thank you for being part of our promotional program.

Sincerely,
Mrs. Mariam Willcox

for UK NATIONAL LOTTERY.
NOTE: You are to contact your officer immediately with the official
EMAIL

 

From : UK ONLINE LOTTERY <ukgame25@hotmail.com>
Reply-To : terrydavis_ukonlineagent@yahoo.co.uk
Sent : Friday, May 26, 2006 6:09 PM
Subject : WINNING NOTICE FOR CATEGORY "A" WINNER
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    bellyache's avatar - 64x64a9wg

    United States
    Member #12618
    March 18, 2005
    2060 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: May 27, 2006, 4:51 am - IP Logged

    I never trust any so called "lottery" that I get in my email or regular mail that I didn't enter. It's simply really, but there are people desperate enough to fall for things like that.

      LOTTOMIKE's avatar - cash money.jpg
      Tennessee
      United States
      Member #7853
      October 15, 2004
      11338 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: May 27, 2006, 5:05 am - IP Logged

      ThudSad Wavey

        Tenaj's avatar - michellea
        Charlotte NC
        United States
        Member #17406
        June 18, 2005
        4053 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: May 27, 2006, 7:28 am - IP Logged

        You should never reply to those e-mails.  If you do it validates your email address and you get on the mailing lists as a good email address for all sorts of scrams (also reply to spam) Our system's administrator screamed that at us all the time.

        but send them to:  

        scams@fraudwatchinternational.com

        There are lots of websites out there dedicated to catching these crooks.

        takeemtothebank

          Todd's avatar - Cylon 2.gif
          Chief Bottle Washer
          New Jersey
          United States
          Member #1
          May 31, 2000
          23261 Posts
          Online
          Posted: May 27, 2006, 7:47 am - IP Logged

          You should never reply to those e-mails.  If you do it validates your email address and you get on the mailing lists as a good email address for all sorts of scrams (also reply to spam) Our system's administrator screamed that at us all the time.

          but send them to:  

          scams@fraudwatchinternational.com

          There are lots of websites out there dedicated to catching these crooks.

          I Agree! 100% correct.  NEVER reply to those e-mails, and NEVER post your e-mail address on a public forum.

          ALSO: 

          Many e-mails programs (such as Microsoft Outlook) have a setting to disable all images embedded in e-mails.  I STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you use that setting.

          Here's the reason:

          Many e-mail spammers send their spam with a tiny 1-pixel image inside the e-mail content, something you could never see.  When your e-mail software loads the spam e-mail, your e-mail software, not realizing what that tiny image is for, naturally tries to fetch the content of image to display it.

          When the spammers created the spam e-mail that was sent to you, they created a unique coded URL for that tiny pixel image, so when their web server sees that somebody is trying to load the pixel image with that special code in it, they know you are reading the e-mail.  Note that you didn't even have to reply or do anything with the e-mail -- they still knew you read it!

          When you disable images in your e-mail program, that tiny pixel does not automatically try to fetch the image from the spammer's server, so the spammer is not notified that you read the e-mail.

          All e-mail software with that image disabling option always have the ability to show images on a per-e-mail basis, so you're able to click a button and see the images in legitimate e-mails.

           

          Check the State Lottery Report Card
          What grade did your lottery earn?

           

          Sign the Petition for True Lottery Drawings
          Help eliminate computerized drawings!

            truecritic's avatar - PirateTreasure
            Michigan
            United States
            Member #22395
            September 24, 2005
            1583 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: May 27, 2006, 8:46 am - IP Logged

            If you use Outlook Express (Outlook mentioned by Todd is a different program) and you are suspicious of an email, any email, you can safely take a peek of what is inside by doing the following:

            1) Highlight and right click.

            2) Choose Properties.  Click Details.  Click Message Source.  Click to maximize the email.

            3) If you are savvy enough, you can see the "email cookie" Todd mentioned, if it is there.  Or possibly identify a virus/trojan within the email.

              Tenaj's avatar - michellea
              Charlotte NC
              United States
              Member #17406
              June 18, 2005
              4053 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: May 27, 2006, 9:33 am - IP Logged

              If you use Outlook Express (Outlook mentioned by Todd is a different program) and you are suspicious of an email, any email, you can safely take a peek of what is inside by doing the following:

              1) Highlight and right click.

              2) Choose Properties.  Click Details.  Click Message Source.  Click to maximize the email.

              3) If you are savvy enough, you can see the "email cookie" Todd mentioned, if it is there.  Or possibly identify a virus/trojan within the email.

              Yes NodJust invest $70 a year and get a good security system (I use Norton's) that automately updates warfare for new viruses, spyware and spam and disables all pictures in e-mails, scan all incoming and outgoing e-mails and set up an automated scan once a week and when new viruses are created everyday it automately update the defense. 

              You can use the computer and do other stuff while it is scanning.  It set the rules for all programs on your computer and it prohibits everything that try to access your computer without permission.  Even when you are installing software it creates permissions for that.

              All of my pictures are disabled in e-mails and I have to click to allow to see them and spam is sent to the spam folder and if one just happens to get through you can send it to the spam folder with the option "This is Spam" and it will never get through again. 

              takeemtothebank


                Australia
                Member #17096
                June 11, 2005
                225 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: May 28, 2006, 1:08 am - IP Logged

                I forwarded the email to the UK lottery. Their response is below:

                Thank you for contacting the Interactive Customer Care Team.

                We would like to advise you that the email you have received is in no
                way connected with Camelot or the National Lottery.

                We would advise you to be aware that there are many e-mail scams and
                attempts to de-fraud people using methods similar to these, and would
                warn strongly against pursuing this type of e-mail without rigorous
                investigation to establish whether it is of a genuine nature.

                Further information on possible scams can be found on the following
                page of our website.

                http://www.national-lottery.co.uk/player/p/promotions/promotions.jsp?p
                romo=commonscams

                If you have any further enquiries or feedback to provide, please
                contact us again.  Alternatively, you may submit your enquiries to our
                online virtual representative, Ask Evie, available by visiting
                http://www.national-lottery.co.uk/player/p/home/home.do, and selecting
                Help.

                Kind regards,

                Interactive Customer Care Team
                help@national-lottery.co.uk
                Open 7 days 8am-11pm
                CM