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How an LP major jackpot winner could help lottery players

Topic closed. 18 replies. Last post 10 years ago by Rip Snorter.

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New Mexico
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March 10, 2005
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Posted: June 26, 2006, 10:54 am - IP Logged

Most of us on LP who don't work for the lotteries have noticed a lot of characteristics in lottery operation behavior we'd find it satisfying to see changed.

Here's something a major jackpot winner could do to bring about some of those changes:

  • Show the happy-face and holding the big check if it's required to get the money into the bank,
  • Once all the papers are signed, hold an interview in front of lottery HQ:

"Thank you, lottery players, for providing the ticket sales to allow me to get a financial boost out of this experience.  I hope each of you has the same experience sometime in the future.

Meanwhile, each of you should know, the amount of money I was just paid, winning against odds of 1:146 million, was not the amount shown on the check.

I will see, maybe, $35 Million of the advertised amount.

Ticket sales for this draw brought in $150 million, of which $75 million went back to the states.  My piece of it, cash value was also $75 million (of which I recieved, maybe, $35m after taxes).

You might well ask what happened to all the money in ticket sales for the 12 draws nobody won.

You'll have to keep asking, lottery players.  Nobody's likely to give you an answer you'll be able to understand if you passed grammar school math.

Keep all this in mind, lottery players, next time you're tempted to spend more than a dollar on tickets.

You won't get all that rich if you win, but this game isn't about making you rich.

It's about making lottery officials rich, and making all of you dream."

Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

It's about number behavior.

Egos don't count.

 

Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

 

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    New Mexico
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    Posted: June 26, 2006, 11:23 am - IP Logged

    Maybe then the new winner could introduce his attorney:

    "Now I'm going to introduce you to my legal counsel, John Shysterlawyer.

    John will explain how I'm paying him a piece of what I've won to execute a class action lawsuit against the Multi-State Lottery Association.

    Deceptive trade practices lawsuit against PB or MM.  Losers in a deceptive trade practices action can be charged triple damages.

     It's in keeping with spirit of the billboards.  We'll be presenting the big check you just saw me holding as evidence.

     Turnabout is fair play. "

    J

    Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

    It's about number behavior.

    Egos don't count.

     

    Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

     

      Raven62's avatar - binary
      New Jersey
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      June 28, 2005
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      Posted: June 26, 2006, 11:35 am - IP Logged

      Administrative Costs for running the Lottery are very, very High, and the Odds of you Winning are very, very Low! Once you're in the Winners Circle the last thing you'll be thinking is what can I do to make the Lottery better for the folks that didn't Win. Wink

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        New Mexico
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        Posted: June 26, 2006, 11:43 am - IP Logged

        Administrative Costs for running the Lottery are very, very High, and the Odds of you Winning are very, very Low! Once you're in the Winners Circle the last thing you'll be thinking is what can I do to make the Lottery better for the folks that didn't Win. Wink

        Speak for yourself on all counts, Raven.

        Unless you are a lottery employee you probably don't have any better idea than I do about what the costs are to them..... I'm betting the margin of profit off one roll would keep everyone on LP in Cadillacs and Rolls Royces for the next few lifetimes.

        Once you're in the Winners Circle the last thing you'll be thinking is what can I do to make the Lottery better for the folks that didn't Win

        That's probably true.  But a class action lawsuit isn't about making things better.  That's just a spinoff.  A class action lawsuit is about money for the people who win the suit. (and making lawyers richer)

        Same as selling lottery tickets is about money for MUSL officials.

        (Incidently, Raven, thanks for joining this thread.  I haven't noticed any posts by you recently, but maybe I've just missed them.  Last I saw of you was when you were sniping at moracco over on the Systems Forum while he was trying to test a system.)

        Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

        It's about number behavior.

        Egos don't count.

         

        Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

         

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          New Mexico
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          Posted: June 26, 2006, 12:49 pm - IP Logged

          Administrative Costs for running the Lottery are very, very High, and the Odds of you Winning are very, very Low! Once you're in the Winners Circle the last thing you'll be thinking is what can I do to make the Lottery better for the folks that didn't Win. Wink

          The high administrative costs involved in operating a lottery are actually worth examining.

          For a state, the costs are a lot higher than they'd be for MUSL because the states have to print up scratchers, deliver them, maintain a lot of offices, etc.

          Here's what the 2004 Vermont Lottery Financial Report had to say about the high administrative costs involved in operating a lottery.

          But, of course, the costs for Vermont would certainly be several times higher than they are for MUSL (who doesn't make similar reports of their own profits easy to find)

           

          2004 The Vermont Lottery continued to be run by a small, efficient staff of professionals consisting of 20 full-time employees and five commissioners. It is still one of the smallest staffs of any lottery in the United

          States, yet it generated $92.4 million in ticket revenue during fiscal year 2004 or $4.62 million per employee.

           

          Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

          It's about number behavior.

          Egos don't count.

           

          Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

           

            bellyache's avatar - 64x64a9wg

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            Posted: June 26, 2006, 1:11 pm - IP Logged

            Most of us on LP who don't work for the lotteries have noticed a lot of characteristics in lottery operation behavior we'd find it satisfying to see changed.

            Here's something a major jackpot winner could do to bring about some of those changes:

            • Show the happy-face and holding the big check if it's required to get the money into the bank,
            • Once all the papers are signed, hold an interview in front of lottery HQ:

            "Thank you, lottery players, for providing the ticket sales to allow me to get a financial boost out of this experience.  I hope each of you has the same experience sometime in the future.

            Meanwhile, each of you should know, the amount of money I was just paid, winning against odds of 1:146 million, was not the amount shown on the check.

            I will see, maybe, $35 Million of the advertised amount.

            Ticket sales for this draw brought in $150 million, of which $75 million went back to the states.  My piece of it, cash value was also $75 million (of which I recieved, maybe, $35m after taxes).

            You might well ask what happened to all the money in ticket sales for the 12 draws nobody won.

            You'll have to keep asking, lottery players.  Nobody's likely to give you an answer you'll be able to understand if you passed grammar school math.

            Keep all this in mind, lottery players, next time you're tempted to spend more than a dollar on tickets.

            You won't get all that rich if you win, but this game isn't about making you rich.

            It's about making lottery officials rich, and making all of you dream."

            Sounds like a good idea Jack, but I don't see myself ever doing that. If I ever have the good fortune of winning a jackpot, I plan on being as boring and dull as possible. Saying somthing this would stir up some buzz and may keep me in the spotlight which I want to avoid in the first place.

            Dance like no one is watching.

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              New Mexico
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              Posted: June 26, 2006, 1:21 pm - IP Logged

              Most of us on LP who don't work for the lotteries have noticed a lot of characteristics in lottery operation behavior we'd find it satisfying to see changed.

              Here's something a major jackpot winner could do to bring about some of those changes:

              • Show the happy-face and holding the big check if it's required to get the money into the bank,
              • Once all the papers are signed, hold an interview in front of lottery HQ:

              "Thank you, lottery players, for providing the ticket sales to allow me to get a financial boost out of this experience.  I hope each of you has the same experience sometime in the future.

              Meanwhile, each of you should know, the amount of money I was just paid, winning against odds of 1:146 million, was not the amount shown on the check.

              I will see, maybe, $35 Million of the advertised amount.

              Ticket sales for this draw brought in $150 million, of which $75 million went back to the states.  My piece of it, cash value was also $75 million (of which I recieved, maybe, $35m after taxes).

              You might well ask what happened to all the money in ticket sales for the 12 draws nobody won.

              You'll have to keep asking, lottery players.  Nobody's likely to give you an answer you'll be able to understand if you passed grammar school math.

              Keep all this in mind, lottery players, next time you're tempted to spend more than a dollar on tickets.

              You won't get all that rich if you win, but this game isn't about making you rich.

              It's about making lottery officials rich, and making all of you dream."

              Sounds like a good idea Jack, but I don't see myself ever doing that. If I ever have the good fortune of winning a jackpot, I plan on being as boring and dull as possible. Saying somthing this would stir up some buzz and may keep me in the spotlight which I want to avoid in the first place.

              Bellyache:

              Likely so would I.

              But LP's full of threads with members dreaming of all the toys and hideouts and security cameras and desert islands and Mercedes jalopies and bedrooms carpeted with 40 inch busts.

              Maybe a nice calm thread now and then pointing out obliquely how MUSL officials already have all that and are getting more every draw can elbow its way in for a little muscle flexing and lap dancing now and then.

              Maybe a little heat will cause them to pause a while in their money counting and puzzling over whether a matrix change to 1:2,000,000,000 would keep them from ever having to pay anything except 200 year annuities.

              J

              Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

              It's about number behavior.

              Egos don't count.

               

              Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

               

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                New Mexico
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                Posted: June 26, 2006, 1:52 pm - IP Logged

                Maybe I've got this completely wrong.

                Maybe MUSL's not rolling around in rooms full of (Swiss bank vault) money like Scrooge McDuck.

                It seems to me MUSL's probably a careful readership for this thread, and any other similar to it.

                Even a reader such as RAVEN, (above) knows more about this than I do.

                 

                Soooooo.  MUSL employees, help me out here.  I don't want to be harder on you than you deserve.

                Start a thread of your own, or just provide a link right here.

                Show us a 2005, 2004, 2003 audit, financial report, something, with a profit/loss statement showing your detailed expenses,  your revenues, your bottom line profits for any year.

                Such a thing is bound to exist.  It's my ineptitude that's kept me from locating it.

                I'd far rather feel sorry for you than to continue believing you are what you are.

                J

                Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                It's about number behavior.

                Egos don't count.

                 

                Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                 

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                  Honduras
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                  Posted: June 26, 2006, 5:04 pm - IP Logged

                  thanks Rip Snorter you gave me an idea and insight...

                  Rip Snorter you wrote:

                  Ticket sales for this draw brought in $150 million, of which $75 million went back to the states.  My piece of it, cash value was also $75 million (of which I recieved, maybe, $35m after taxes).

                   

                  is that true or you made it up? How can you fiind out what the lottery brought in in sales?

                   

                   

                                            ".....For the glory of Rome....."


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                    New Mexico
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                    Posted: June 26, 2006, 5:23 pm - IP Logged

                    Pumpi:

                    Excellent question.

                    Cash value, I read on another thread, is 45 percent of PB advertised jackpots now.

                    I have no idea how to find out ticket sales histories for PB and MM draws.  However, Texas (according to a poster on another thread) published ticket sales for three MM jackpot winning draws.  I backtracked those and compared ticket sales on one of those to the payout.

                    The result was damning for MM.  They payed out $28 M (I'm relying on memory) less than ticket sales two days before the draw.  There'd been 12 rolls with no 1st tier payout.

                    No, I'm not making it up.

                    I'd like to see official figures for ticket sales and payouts, just as you would.

                    MUSL revenues are derived almost exclusively through the sufferance of your elected officials.  Government isn't precisely the customer, but government allows them to generate revenues in ways forbidden to you and me.

                    Surely, surely surely those government officials require fiscal, profit/loss reports.  Audit reports.

                    Surely surely surely the records of those reports are within the public domain.

                    Open records.

                    Surely. 

                     

                    J

                    Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                    It's about number behavior.

                    Egos don't count.

                     

                    Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                     

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                      New Mexico
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                      Posted: June 26, 2006, 6:05 pm - IP Logged

                      According to Lottery Insider, MUSL is a NON-PROFIT organization.

                      Isn't that interesting?

                      Non-profit organizations aren't allowed to make profits.  Most of them have to file all kinds of reports every which way to make certain they don't make profits.  Non-Profit organizations get a lot of scrutiny, as a rule. 

                      File a lot of reports, non-profits, yes.  MUSL?  Probably them, too.  It's just those reports ain't easy to find.

                       

                      However, MUSL does a lot of business with GTech.  A hmmmm yeah, a profit organization.  According to their consolidated balance sheet GTech pulled down Gross profit $482,628 M for 2005.

                      Not too shabby. 

                      So MUSL doesn't make a profit, just rakes in the dough and hires GTech to claim the profits by spending it.

                      It would be interesting to know whether any of the Board of Directors on MUSL are also on the Board of Directors for GTech, if a person had a suspicious mind.

                      What's the rule of thumb on that?

                      Follow the money, I think it goes.

                      J

                      Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                      It's about number behavior.

                      Egos don't count.

                       

                      Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                       

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                        Honduras
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                        Posted: June 26, 2006, 6:05 pm - IP Logged

                        thanks...

                         

                         

                        "....Bullets kill people: so do incoming electronic missiles....."

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                          New Mexico
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                          Posted: June 26, 2006, 6:34 pm - IP Logged

                          Here's the Board of Directors for GTech.  I'll confess they don't appear to be all that sinister.

                          Dewey was Managing Director of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Securities Corporation from 1983 through 1995, and as a member of its Board of Directors, and the name Jenrette has the ring of a US Senator or Representative involved in some scandal decades ago, but there mightn't be a connection, probably doesn't mean anything.

                          No mention anywhere of any of these folks being on the MUSL board.

                          Ah well.  Breweries, Sara Lee pastries, ..... drinking, gambling and stuffing the old face surely ain't a sin.

                          So, where's all that MUSL money going?

                           

                          Board of Directors

                          Strong, Involved, and Committed


                          The success of GTECH's business relies on the trust and respect of our stakeholders, particularly the governments we serve and the citizens they represent. To earn this trust and respect, it is essential that all GTECH representatives embrace and practice values and behaviors that reflect the highest levels of integrity. GTECH's global management today is made up of individuals with broad business experience and superlative professional achievements.

                           

                           

                           


                          Robert M. Dewey, Jr.

                           

                          Robert M. Dewey, Jr. has been a GTECH Director since 1995, and was named Chairman in August 2003. He retired in April 2000 as a Senior Advisor of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (DLJ), an investment banking firm. Prior to that, Mr. Dewey served as Chairman of the Board of Autranet, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of DLJ. Mr. Dewey also served as Managing Director of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Securities Corporation from 1983 through 1995, and as a member of its Board of Directors.



                           

                           

                           


                          Paget L. Alves

                           

                          Paget L. Alves was appointed a GTECH Director in January 2005. Mr. Alves currently serves as President of Strategic Markets, a business unit of Sprint Business Solutions division, with responsibility for Sprint's 100 largest business customers, systems integrators, international customers, access and wholesale carriers, and cable ventures. Over the past several years, Mr. Alves has served in senior leadership capacities for a variety of telecommunications/technology companies including Sprint, PointOne Telecommunications, Centennial Communications, Murata Business Systems, and IBM.

                           

                           

                           


                          Christine M. Cournoyer

                           

                          Christine M. Cournoyer was appointed a GTECH Director in July 2003. Ms. Cournoyer is currently the Managing Director, Database Solutions of Harte-Hanks, Inc., a worldwide provider of direct and targeted marketing services. Prior to this, Ms. Cournoyer was a self-employed private business consultant, and served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Lightbridge, Inc., a $134 million global provider of mobile and online business solutions and services. Previous to Lightbridge, Ms. Cournoyer served as a Vice President at IBM, where she was responsible for worldwide administration, fulfillment, and IT for IBM's $8 billion Software Group. Prior to IBM, Ms. Cournoyer was Senior Vice President of IT and Customer Operations at Lotus Development Corporation. Earlier in her career, Ms. Cournoyer held roles of increasing responsibility at Bolt, Beranek & Newman, and Wang Laboratories.

                          Ms. Cournoyer currently serves on the Board of Directors at the Stride Rite Corporation. She has also served as co-chairperson for the Boston Society of Information Management, and as a member of the Advisory Council for College Management Sciences at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, Massachusetts.

                           

                           

                           


                          Burnett W. Donoho

                           

                          Burnett W. Donoho has been a GTECH Director since 1992. Mr. Donoho also serves as a Director of Smarthome Inc., a home automation products company. He has been a self-employed retail consultant from January 2001 to present, and also from 1995 to February 1997. He was Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer of Montgomery Ward, Inc., a privately held department store, from February 1997 to December 1997. Mr. Donoho held the position of CEO at Club Sports International, a health club company, from 1998 to 2001. He previously served as Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer of Macy's East, a division of R.H. Macy & Co., Inc., and President of Marshall Field and Co., both department store chains.

                           

                           

                           

                           


                          The Rt. Hon. Sir Jeremy Hanley KCMG

                           

                          The Rt. Hon. Sir Jeremy Hanley KCMG was appointed a GTECH Director in April 2001. Sir Jeremy is currently serving as a Non-Executive Director (and Chairman of the Audit Committee) of events organizer ITE Group plc, and as a Director of the Advisory Board at professional services group Talal Abu-Ghazaleh International. He has also served on a number of boards in the last seven years since retiring from politics, covering a wide range of interests, mostly specializing in the Middle East, Far East and South-East Asia, Eastern Europe and Africa, including Credit Lyonnais and Adval Group plc.

                          Sir Jeremy was a member of the Government of the United Kingdom, having served as a Cabinet Minister, as Chairman of the Conservative Party, Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and Minister of State for the Armed Forces at the Ministry of Defense. As Under-Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, he served as Minister for Health and Social Security, Minister of Agriculture, Minister for Education, Arts & Sport, and Minister for Political Development.

                          Sir Jeremy is a Chartered Accountant, specializing in corporate governance. He was appointed a Privy Counsellor in 1994 and a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1997.

                           

                           

                           

                           


                          Philip R. Lochner, Jr.

                           

                          Phillip R. Lochner Jr. was appointed a GTECH Director in January 2001. He currently serves as a Director for Apria Healthcare Group, Adelphia Communications Corporation, CLARCOR Inc., CMS Energy, and Solutia, Inc. Mr. Lochner was a Commissioner of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission from 1990 to 1991, and is an accomplished business leader in the communications and entertainment industry. He spent 12 years at Time Inc., a publishing, cable television and television programming company in New York, where he held various legal and administrative positions, including Vice President and General Counsel and Secretary. Most recently, he served as Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer at Time Warner. Mr. Lochner retired from Time Warner in 1998.

                           

                           

                           


                          James F. McCann

                           

                          James F. McCann was appointed a GTECH Director in February 2003. Mr. McCann currently serves as Chairman and Chief Executive Office of 1-800-Flowers.com, Inc., headquartered in Westbury, New York. Mr. McCann has been in the retail floral industry since 1976. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors for Willis Group Holdings Limited and for The Boyds Collection, Ltd., a company specializing in collectible, gift, and specialty products.

                           

                           

                           


                          Anthony Ruys

                           

                          Anthony Ruys has been a GTECH Director since 1996 and Chairman of the Executive Board of Heineken N.V., a Netherlands-based international brewery group since April 2002. Prior to this, Ruys served as Vice Chairman of the Executive Board of Heineken from 1996 through April 2002. Mr. Ruys also served in increasingly senior positions within the Unilever Group, a Netherlands and U.K.-based consumer good conglomerate, from 1974 to 1993. He currently serves as a member of the Supervisory Board of Sara Lee/DE International and of the ABN AMRO Bank.

                           

                           

                           


                          W. Bruce Turner

                           

                          W. Bruce Turner is President and Chief Executive Officer of GTECH Holdings Corporation, and a GTECH Director. Mr. Turner joined GTECH's Board in October 1999, and served as GTECH's non-executive Chairman from July 2000 though August 2002. Mr. Turner specialized in the coverage of equity issues in the leisure industry for almost 10 years. From 1994 to 1999, Mr. Turner served as Managing Director of Equity Research at Solomon Smith Barney. He also spent five years at Raymond James as Director of Leisure Equity Research. Mr. Turner is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and began his career in the United States Army as a Field Artillery Officer.

                           

                           

                           

                           

                          Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                          It's about number behavior.

                          Egos don't count.

                           

                          Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                           

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                            New Mexico
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                            Posted: June 26, 2006, 9:04 pm - IP Logged

                            At the MUSL site if you click Where the money goes, you end up with this first page

                             http://www.naspl.org/about.html

                             It's heartening to know that's not where the money for all those rolls is hiding itself.  $222 M (amount of total contributions to US beneficiaries) ought to be covered easily by a couple of high dollar rolls.

                             

                             

                             

                             

                            Where the
                            Money Goes

                             

                            Cumulative Lottery Contributions to Beneficiaries
                            (From Startup to 6/30/05) - ($ millions)

                             

                            Arizona (1982) 

                            Local Transportation Assistance Fund

                            $535.00

                            County Assistance Fund

                            $144.98

                            Heritage Fund

                            $278.52

                            Economic Development Fund

                            $46.15

                            Mass Transit

                            $44.35

                            Healthy Arizona

                            $20.67

                             

                            General Fund (by Category)

                             

                            Education

                            $419.47

                            Health and Welfare

                            $166.34

                            Protection and Safety

                            $77.56

                            General Government

                            $44.34

                            Inspection and Regulation

                            $7.55

                            Natural Resources

                            $6.45

                            Court Appointed Special Advocate Fund (Unclaimed prizes)

                            $25.88

                            Clean Air Fund (Unclaimed prizes)

                            $0.50

                            State General Fund (Unclaimed prizes)

                            $1.50

                             

                            $1,819.26

                             

                            California (1985) 

                            Education

                            $17,166.46

                             

                            Colorado (1983) 

                            Capital Construction Fund

                            $439.80

                            Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation

                            $148.90

                            Conservation Trust Fund

                            $596.10

                            Great Outdoors Colorado Trust Fund

                            $411.40

                            General Fund

                            $1.30

                            School Fund

                            $16.30

                             

                            $1,613.80

                             

                            Connecticut (1972) 

                            General Fund (to benefit education, roads, health and hospitals, public safety, etc.)

                            $5,562.82

                             

                            D.C. (1982) 

                            General Fund

                            $1,340.00

                             

                            Delaware (1975) 

                            General Fund

                            $2,072.70

                             

                            Florida (1987) 

                            Education Enhancement Trust Fund

                            $15,203.00

                             

                            Georgia (1993)

                             

                            HOPE Scholarships

                            $3,058.88

                            Pre-Kindergarten Program

                            $2,405.78

                            Capital Outlay and Technology for Primary and Secondary Schools

                            $1,800.00

                             

                            $7,264.66

                             

                            Idaho (1989)

                             

                            Public Schools (K-12)

                            $150.50

                            Public Buildings

                            $150.50

                             

                            $301.00

                             

                            Illinois (1974)

                             

                            Illinois Common School Fund (K-12)

                            $12,896.00

                             

                            Indiana (1989)

                             

                            Build Indiana Fund

                            $1,920.40

                            Teachers' Retirement Fund

                            $462.60

                            Police & Fire Pension Relief Fund

                            $276.30

                            Help America Vote Act

                            $1.80

                             

                            $2,661.10

                             

                            Iowa (1985)

                             

                            Iowa Plan (economic development)

                            $170.32

                            CLEAN Fund (environment and agriculture)

                            $35.89

                            Gambler's Treatment Program

                            $10.37

                            Special Appropriations

                            $20.83

                            Sales Tax

                            $135.98

                            General Fund

                            $561.46

                             

                            $934.85

                             

                            Kansas (1987)

                             

                            Economic Development Initiatives Fund

                            $604.56

                            Correctional Institutions Building Fund

                            $71.28

                            County Reappraisal Project (FY 88-90)

                            $17.20

                            Juvenile Detention Facilities Fund

                            $22.69

                            State General Fund (FY 1995-2004)

                            $105.99

                            Problem Gambling Grant Fund

                            $0.40

                             

                            $822.12

                             

                            Kentucky (1989)

                             

                            Education

                            $214.00

                            Vietnam Veterans

                            $32.00

                            General Fund

                            $1,387.60

                            Post-Secondary & College Scholarships

                            $609.60

                            Affordable Housing Trust Fund

                            $20.80

                            Literacy Programs & Early Childhood Reading

                            $18.00

                             

                            $2,282.00

                             

                            Louisiana (1991)

                             

                            Various State Agencies

                            $147.30

                            State General Fund

                            $69.20

                            Minimum Foundation Program - Funding elementary & secondary education in public schools

                            $1,283.45

                            Problem Gambling

                            $4.50

                             

                            $1,504.45

                             

                            Maine (1974)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $732.00

                            Outdoor Heritage Fund

                            $11.91

                             

                            $743.91

                             

                            Maryland (1973)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $8,790.40

                            Subdivisions (for one year only FY ‘84-85)

                            $31.25

                            Stadium Authority

                            $422.13

                             

                            $9,243.78

                             

                            Massachusetts (1972)

                             

                            Cities and Towns

                            $12,028.14

                            Arts Council

                            $189.90

                            General Fund

                            $2,991.44

                            Compulsive Gamblers

                            $10.46

                             

                            $15,219.94

                             

                            Michigan (1972)

                             

                            Education (K-12)

                            $12,800.00

                             

                            Minnesota (1989)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $800.59

                            Environmental and Natural Resources Trust Fund

                            $349.00

                            Game & Fish Fund

                            $50.87

                            Natural Resources Fund

                            $50.87

                            Other State Programs

                            $36.70

                            Compulsive Gambling

                            $18.70

                             

                            $1,306.73

                             

                            Missouri (1986)

                             

                            Public Education

                            $1,915.34

                            General Revenue Fund (1986-1993)

                            $542.54

                             

                            $2,457.88

                             

                            Montana (1987)

                             

                            Property Tax Relief

                            $15.34

                            Elementary and Secondary Schools

                            $34.09

                            Juvenile Detention

                            $2.53

                            General Fund

                            $69.10

                            Study of Socioeconomic Impact on Gambling

                            $0.10

                             

                            $121.16

                             

                            Nebraska (1993)

                             

                            Compulsive Gamblers Assistance Fund

                            $5.29

                            Education Innovation Fund

                            $101.49

                            Environmental Trust Fund

                            $94.05

                            Solid Waste Landfill Closure Assistance Fund

                            $18.46

                            General Fund

                            $5.00

                            State Fair Support & Improvement Fund

                            $1.59

                            Nebraska Scholarship Fund

                            $11.02

                             

                            $236.90

                             

                            New Hampshire (1964)

                             

                            Education

                            $999.90

                             

                            New Jersey (1970)

                             

                            Education and Institutions

                            $14,725.80

                             

                            New Mexico (1996)

                             

                            Public School Capital Outlay

                            $66.55

                            Lottery Tuition Fund

                            $182.65

                             

                            $249.20

                             

                            New York (1967)

                             

                            Education

                            $27,000.00

                             

                            North Dakota (2004)

                             

                            Compulsive Gambling Fund

                            $0.40

                            State General Fund

                            $7.27

                             

                            $7.67

                             

                            Ohio (1974)

                             

                            Education

                            $13,670.00

                             

                            Oklahoma(2005)

                            No FY' 05 Sales

                             

                            Oregon (1985)

                             

                            Economic Development

                            $1,500.00

                            Public Education

                            $2,400.00

                            Natural Resource Programs

                            $300.00

                             

                            $4,200.00

                             

                            Pennsylvania (1972)

                             

                            Older Pennsylvanians

                            $14,650.00

                             

                            Rhode Island (1974)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $2,300.00

                             

                            South Carolina (2002)

                             

                            Education Lottery Fund

                            $868.24

                             

                            South Dakota (1989)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $371.81

                            Capital Construction Fund

                            $17.28

                            Property Tax Reduction Fund

                            $935.31

                            Grant to Human Services

                            $1.76

                             

                            $1,326.16

                             

                            Tennessee (2004)

                             

                            Lottery for Education Account

                            $350.69

                            After School Program

                            $8.92

                             

                            $359.61

                             

                            Texas (1992)

                             

                            General Revenue Fund

                            $4,997.82

                            Foundation School Fund

                            $7,629.34

                            Multicategorical Teaching Hospital

                            $100.00

                            Tertiary Care Facility Account

                            $131.07

                            Health and Human Services Commission's Graduate Medical Program

                            $40.00

                             

                            $12,898.23

                             

                            Vermont (1978)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $212.46

                            Education Fund

                            $128.70

                             

                            $341.16

                             

                            Virginia (1988)

                             

                            General Fund (FY 1989-1998)

                            $2,788.42

                            Direct aid to Public Education K-12 (FY 1999-present)

                            $2,548.96

                            Literary Fund (primarily for school construction additions and renovations)

                            $141.60

                            Debt set-off collection

                            $12.27

                             

                            $5,491.25

                             

                            Washington (1982)

                             

                            General Fund

                            $1,838.11

                            Education Funds

                            $374.22

                            Seattle Mariners Stadium (Safeco Field)

                            $33.88

                            King County Stadium and Exhibition Center (Qwest Field)

                            $47.39

                             

                            $2,293.60

                             

                            West Virginia (1986)

                             

                            Education

                            $773.72

                            Senior Citizens

                            $328.30

                            Tourism

                            $318.33

                            Bonds covering profit areas

                            $0.00

                            General Fund

                            $457.74

                            Other

                            $802.01

                             

                            $2,680.10

                             

                            Wisconsin (1988)

                             

                            Public Benefit such as Property Tax Relief

                            $2,368.00

                             

                             

                            TOTAL - US

                            $222,003.44

                             

                             

                            Atlantic Lottery (1976)

                             

                            Lotteries Commission of New Brunswick

                            $1,351.27

                            Provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador

                            $1,254.43

                            Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation

                            $1,917.66

                            Prince Edward Island Lotteries Commission

                            $219.82

                             

                            $4,743.18

                             

                            British Columbia (1974)

                             

                            Government of British Columbia

                            $7,400.00

                             

                            Loto-Québec (1970)

                             

                            Consolidated Fund

                            $18,773.00

                            Government of Canada

                            $322.90

                            Special Commissions to Non-Profit Organizations

                            $71.35

                            Independent Community Action Support Fund

                            $151.42

                            Agricultural Ministry

                            $36.30

                            Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Science and Technology

                            $33.60

                            Culture & Communication Ministry

                            $3.00

                            Municipal Affairs

                            $2.60

                            Social Services Ministry

                            $197.00

                             

                            $19,591.17

                             

                            Ontario (1975)

                             

                            Province of Ontario

                            $13,130.00

                             

                            Western Canada (1974)

                             

                            Member Provinces and Associate Territories

                            $5,019.00

                             

                             

                            TOTAL - CANADA

                            $49,883.35

                             

                             

                            Puerto Rico (1991)

                             

                            Contingency Fund to Subsidize Rent for Elders Economically Disadvantaged

                            $32.30

                            Municipality Fund

                            $387.00

                            Public Health Reform

                            $44.10

                            General Fund

                            $889.20

                             

                            $1,352.60

                             

                             

                            Mexico (1991)

                            n/a

                             

                            Aruba

                            n/a

                             

                            Virgin Islands (1994)

                            n/a

                             

                             

                            http://www.naspl.org/about.html

                             

                            Executive
                            Committee

                             

                            2005-2006 NASPL Executive Committee

                            President
                            Gerald Aubin, Director
                            Rhode Island Lottery

                             

                            First Vice President
                            Clint Harris, Executive Director
                            Minnesota State Lottery

                             

                            Second Vice President
                            Ernie Passailaigue, Director
                            South Carolina Education Lottery

                             

                            Secretary
                            John Musgrave, Executive Director
                            West Virginia Lottery

                             

                            Treasurer
                            Margaret DeFrancisco, President and CEO
                            Georgia Lottery Corporation

                             

                            Immediate Past President
                            Thomas Shaheen, Chief Executive Officer
                            North Carolina Education Lottery

                             

                            Region I Director
                            Wayne Lemons, Director
                            Delaware Lottery

                             

                            Region II Director
                            Rebecca Paul, President and CEO
                            Tennessee Lottery

                             

                            Region III Director
                            Michael Edmonds, Director
                            Wisconsin Lottery

                             

                            Region IV Director
                            Margaret Gordon, Director
                            Colorado Lottery

                            (not pictured)
                            President, Interprovincial Lotteries

                            George Sweny, Senior Vice President, Lottery Division
                            Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation

                             

                            Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                            It's about number behavior.

                            Egos don't count.

                             

                            Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                             

                              Avatar
                              New Mexico
                              United States
                              Member #12305
                              March 10, 2005
                              2984 Posts
                              Offline
                              Posted: June 27, 2006, 9:08 am - IP Logged

                              I'll confess when I began this thread I had no idea where it would lead.

                              I did expect to see some discussions..... maybe some in-depth ones between interested LP members, perhaps including LP members connected to lottery organizations.

                              Instead, the regulars who aren't connected have demonstrated scratching below the surface of the financial (non- payout) side of things really doesn't fire them up.

                              And lottery officials evidently aren't going to allow themselves to be drawn into a discussion that might throw some light and answers onto the question of where all that money is going.

                              I have an idea the answer won't be too difficult to dig up, given some of the information available at various sites.

                              It's been a bit shocking and truly enlightening in a lot of ways.

                               

                              • The fact that GTech, evidently a lynchpin in the gambling business almost everywhere has assets approaching half a trillion dollars is certainly a surprise.
                              • The fact there really is some serious unexplained money-vanishing act
                              • The fact that MUSL officials have their conferences in Las Vegas under the heading of Global Gambling Conferences raises an eyebrow
                              • The fact MUSL's a Non-Profit, but seems to be escaping much scrutiny because of the quasi-public nature of it.... it's an organization of STATES.... comprised of STATE LOTTERY OFFICIALS .... But there's a likelihood even the elected officials don't understand what's going on there

                              All this leads me to further surprise that the anti-lottery and anti-gambling forces haven't done some digging to throw light on the subject.

                              About 12 hours of web-searching convinces me there's a subject to have light thrown on.

                              Frankly, I wasn't looking for a research project, a new book to write, new articles for magazines, etc.

                              If I were looking for such a research/writing project, this wouldn't be it.

                              However, because at the moment there's no sign of any fresh air coming in from the lottery connected LP members, and because there's no sign the non-connected LP members feel the need to discuss it here, I'm either going to have to make a decision.

                              I'm either going to have to stifle my curiosity about a subject that appears to be loaded with ugly meat and simply drop it because it really isn't my business, isn't where I want to go or be,

                              Or I'm going to have to lock my teeth into it and figure on spending a lot of time on it, creating blogs, writing articles, researching, composing .... maybe writing a book ...

                              I'd rather that weren't my choices.

                              J

                               

                               

                              Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                              It's about number behavior.

                              Egos don't count.

                               

                              Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser