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Anonimity and/or Privacy

Topic closed. 2 replies. Last post 10 years ago by AlecWest.

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AlecWest's avatar - alec
Vader, Washington
United States
Member #29697
January 5, 2006
108 Posts
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Posted: July 24, 2006, 6:33 am - IP Logged

Just want to get some opinions here.  Assume for a moment that you found out you'd won a lottery jackpot and decided to take the lump-sum cash option of, say, $10,000,000.  What would you do, if anything, prior to redemption and after redemption, to protect your anonimity and/or privacy?  Who would you tell?  Who wouldn't you tell?

    Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
    Zeta Reticuli Star System
    United States
    Member #30470
    January 17, 2006
    10351 Posts
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    Posted: July 24, 2006, 6:34 pm - IP Logged

    Among the people I wouldn't tell would definitely be anyone who is a known gambler.  

    Gamblers always want other people to bail them out - just so they can go play some more.

    There have been books written about what to do if you won a kackpoet, and in fact the Missouri Lottery website has a page about what to do if you win a jackpot, and they themselves advise:

    Changing your phone #

    Getting a P O Box

    and blowing town for awhile.

    In one of the books I mentioned above, the author tells a story of an in-law finding out someone had won a jackpot, calling them up and saying, "Well isn't it wonderful that we have won all that money!" 

    Most people probably know at least one person like that.

    If given the chance not to tell anyone, I wouldn't.  But if you had to do a press conference that would probably shatter your chances of reamining anonymous.

    There are several in-depth discussions here about this, just try searching "anonymous".

    Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

    Lep

    There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

      AlecWest's avatar - alec
      Vader, Washington
      United States
      Member #29697
      January 5, 2006
      108 Posts
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      Posted: July 25, 2006, 1:45 am - IP Logged


      I was hoping that "someone" would respond (grin).  I think you and I are probably in the minority - people who really WANT to retain their privacy and anonimity.  A few months back, I put up a website with the results of extensive research on that topic:

      http://LuckyYou.atspace.com

      Here's an example.  Kansas lottery law has a specific provision that mandates anonimity for all lottery jackpot winners.  It's even an "exclusion" under Kansas state open-records laws.  The ONLY way they can release a winner's name to the media is upon "written" request of the winner.

      You'd think that with a law like that, and assuming the winner didn't spill the beans himself/herself, their anonimity would be assured.  Not necessarily.  If there's an unclaimed jackpot, media entities sometimes send stringer reporters to wait in the lottery commission lobby - to take photos of winners who show up in person - and later track them down to their homes by watching them drive off (and taking note of their license plate number - running it against motor vehicle records).

      But, even if you redeemed your ticket by registered mail, there's still one way a winner's identity could become public.  Here's a true story shared with me by one lottery official about a guy who wanted to keep his identity secret, had the laws on his side, but still couldn't keep it secret.

      Retailers selling lottery tickets get a "bonus" for selling jackpot winners.  After the drawing, one retailer was notified he'd sold the winning ticket - which includes telling the retailer the ID number of the ticket.  Using his lottery terminal, the retailer pulled up info on the ticket's ID number showing the date and time the ticket was sold.  Then, going through his store's surveillance video archives until he got to that date and time, he saw the winner buying his ticket.  And the next time the winner came into the store, the retailer recognized him and congratulated him in front of other patrons - some of whom knew the winner personally.