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Star power

Topic closed. 7 replies. Last post 10 years ago by dartiger.

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Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
Wyncote,Pa
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Posted: December 7, 2006, 6:22 am - IP Logged

Arabian mathematicians and astronomers had, as a well established fact of history, acquired most of their knowledge of algebra, arithmatic and astronomy from India.

    Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
    Wyncote,Pa
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    Posted: December 7, 2006, 6:51 am - IP Logged

    Few Americans are aware of the immense scientific contributions of India and China.


    Albert Einstein wrote: “We owe a lot to the Indians, who taught us how to count, without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could have been made.”


    The number zero was introduced by an Indian mathematician named Aryabhatta. We take the significance of the number zero for granted.


    Yet, until one thousand five hundred (1500) years ago, mathematicians did not realize that it was necessary to include zero in their number system.

    Today, the binary system of zeros and ones is the absolute cornerstone of computing.

    It would have been impossible to develop computers based on the Roman system of numerals. Therefore, I argue that the introduction of zero into our number system is the greatest scientific achievement of all time.

    It is difficult to disagree with the American writer Mark Twain, then, who said:

    “India is the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history, the grandmother of legend and the great grand mother of tradition.”

    Yet, in the main, American history books omit the contributions of India. They omit the contributions of Arab scholars. They omit the contributions of China.

     

     

     

    The science of astronomy was also spurred by the need to have accurate calendars and a better understanding of climate and rainfall patterns for timely sowing and choice of crops. At the same time, religion and astrology also played a role in creating an interest in astronomy and a negative fallout of this irrational influence was the rejection of scientific theories that were far ahead of their time. One of the greatest scientists of the Gupta period - Aryabhatta (born in 476 AD, Kusumpura, Bihar) provided a systematic treatment of the position of the planets in space. He correctly posited the axial rotation of the earth, and inferred correctly that the orbits of the planets were ellipses. He also correctly deduced that the moon and the planets shined by reflected sunlight and provided a valid explanation for the solar and lunar eclipses rejecting the superstitions and mythical belief systems surrounding the phenomenon. Although Bhaskar I (born Saurashtra, 6th C, and follower of the Asmaka school of science, Nizamabad, Andhra ) recognized his genius and the tremendous value of his scientific contributions, some later astronomers continued to believe in a static earth and rejected his rational explanations of the eclipses. But in spite of such setbacks, Aryabhatta had a profound influence on the astronomers and mathematicians who followed him, particularly on those from the Asmaka school.

    Mathematics played a vital role in Aryabhatta's revolutionary understanding of the solar system. His calculations on pi, the circumferance of the earth (62832 miles) and the length of the solar year (within about 13 minutes of the modern calculation) were remarkably close approximations. In making such calculations, Aryabhatta had to solve several mathematical problems that had not been addressed before including problems in algebra (beej-ganit) and trigonometry (trikonmiti).

     

     Carl Segan, a renowned astronomer at Cornell University, who hosted the public television series "Cosmos" in 1985, pointed out that Hindus were the only ones who came anywhere close to correctly estimating the real age of the universe. Unlike many cultural traditions which treat science and religion as antithetical to each other, the Hindu tradition encourages the study of physics and metaphysics both for a comparative understanding of the true nature of the cosmic mystery surrounding and pervading the universe

      WIN  D's avatar - q05Q0
      Stone Mountain*Georgia
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      Posted: December 7, 2006, 12:41 pm - IP Logged

        Blackapple  wrote the following .... 

      "The science of astronomy was also spurred by the need to have accurate calendars and a better understanding of climate and rainfall patterns for timely sowing and choice of crops. At the same time, religion and astrology also played a role in creating an interest in astronomy and a negative fallout of this irrational influence was the rejection of scientific theories that were far ahead of their time"

       I am surprised that you of all people wrote such a harsh criticism on the Negative influence and roll that "Astrology" and "Religion" had on slowing mankind's progress in the Science of Astronomy !

       But I do agree with you 100%. Astrology/Religion did give the Science of Astronomy a bad name and almost strangled it to death. It is unfortunate that this confusion still exist today. 

       Thank goodness Astronomy broke free of those "Dark Ages" when people confused the pagan worship of Astrology  idols with science. 

       Good job BA.... not only is your writing style getting better.  I am proud of your big conversion over to Science and Mathematics. 

       

       

      The only real failure .....is the failure to try.                               

                                    Luck is a very rare thing....... Odds not so much. 

                                    Odds never change .....but probability does. 

                                                                                             Win d    

        Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
        Wyncote,Pa
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        Posted: December 7, 2006, 1:40 pm - IP Logged

        Unlike many cultural traditions which treat science and religion as antithetical to each other, the Hindu tradition encourages the study of physics and metaphysics both for a comparative understanding of the true nature of the cosmic mystery surrounding and pervading the universe

        http://www.hindunet.org/hindu_history/ancient/mahabharat/mahab_sarasvat.html

          WIN  D's avatar - q05Q0
          Stone Mountain*Georgia
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          Posted: December 7, 2006, 2:14 pm - IP Logged

          Unlike many cultural traditions which treat science and religion as antithetical to each other, the Hindu tradition encourages the study of physics and metaphysics both for a comparative understanding of the true nature of the cosmic mystery surrounding and pervading the universe

          http://www.hindunet.org/hindu_history/ancient/mahabharat/mahab_sarasvat.html

           Yes ...this adds to your original written statement up there doesn't it. This points out how bad mixing the 2 things actually works against Science and progress doesn't it?   

          You are saying this "cultural tradition" of mixing Astronomy Science with Comical Astrology is a bad thing right? You are backing up your first writing up there and doing a hell of a job ....thereby... further showing how this mixing stifles the progress of Science.

           Again .... great incite.. and examples of the worthlessness of this futile tradition. 

           Got it BA.....  The sillyness of  Astrology and the Science of Astronomy do not Mix. 

           The levels of progress can actually be measured between modern and non modern societies can't it?     

           

           

          The only real failure .....is the failure to try.                               

                                        Luck is a very rare thing....... Odds not so much. 

                                        Odds never change .....but probability does. 

                                                                                                 Win d    

            Thoth's avatar - binary
            Findlay, Ohio
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            Posted: December 7, 2006, 8:33 pm - IP Logged

            Arabian mathematicians and astronomers had, as a well established fact of history, acquired most of their knowledge of algebra, arithmatic and astronomy from India.

            The ancient Indians have never gotten enough credit in history.  The same goes for the achievements of the Egyptians and Sumerians of the olden days.  I think if anyone really reads into the histories of those countries and compares them to each other, one is left to seriously wonder how they discovered such things without all the advanced tools and machinery or equipment like we have today—let alone the absence of computers.  I've always believed there is much, much more to the big picture than what we have all been tought to believe about world history.  I tend to think that what is treated as mythology was probably actually based on some truth that existed in one form or another back then.  The ancient Indian Vedas and Mahabharata speak of many things that can't just be taken as plain myth.  But then again, anything that goes against the established authorities in control usually gets sweept under the rug. 

            ~Probability=Odds in Motion~

              jokerh1977's avatar - animal duck.jpg
              Washington
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              Posted: December 8, 2006, 1:40 am - IP Logged

              The ancient Indians have never gotten enough credit in history.  The same goes for the achievements of the Egyptians and Sumerians of the olden days.  I think if anyone really reads into the histories of those countries and compares them to each other, one is left to seriously wonder how they discovered such things without all the advanced tools and machinery or equipment like we have today—let alone the absence of computers.  I've always believed there is much, much more to the big picture than what we have all been tought to believe about world history.  I tend to think that what is treated as mythology was probably actually based on some truth that existed in one form or another back then.  The ancient Indian Vedas and Mahabharata speak of many things that can't just be taken as plain myth.  But then again, anything that goes against the established authorities in control usually gets sweept under the rug. 

              "But then again, anything that goes against the established authorities in control usually gets swept under the rug."

               

              Thoth,

              That is sooooooooooo true. I Agree!

              What a wonderful world...

                dartiger's avatar - teddy simple.png
                Elkins Park PA
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                Posted: December 16, 2006, 8:58 am - IP Logged

                where are the mayans and Aztecs if we speak of unrecognized cultures.  think though where does knowledge spring forth from, and what is the use of knowledge if it can not be applied.

                    zero is a very interesting number but is it a true number of the space in time which is the instant (manifestation)  no answer here just something I have been pondering over myself.  Two reasons.  Often I find myself saying 9(letter O) 2: instead of 9 zero 2.

                now I am focusing on zero.  my mind must be confused.  But I also do not hear the zero when a number comes which is why I always add zero  for example  138  would be 1380, but in this case I did not have that dilemma for the decimal places were put there by hearing one hundred and thirty eight,  but I am learning that space between the note that make the music (zero) should be always added to a three digit.