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Tesla

Topic closed. 7 replies. Last post 10 years ago by Blackapple.

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Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
Wyncote,Pa
United States
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Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:34 am - IP Logged

Review : A walk on the wildside

  • 07 June 1997
  • Jane Gregory
  • Magazine issue 2085

London

Wizardby Mark Seifer, Carol Publishing, £27, ISBN 1 55972 329 7

Einsteinby Albert Fösling, Viking, $37.95, ISBN 0 670 85545 6

Feynman by John and Mary Gribbin, Viking, £18, ISBN 0 670 87245 8

THE hero of Mark Seifer's Wizard is a scientist who thinks eating and sleeping are a waste of time, and instead hops naked onto a vibrating electrified plate for his daily vivification. He is more intimate with city pigeons than people, believes he can talk to Martians, has restaurant tables cleared if a fly so much as touches the cloth, harbours a phobia about ladies' earrings and develops fever if he merely looks at a peach.

But this mad scientist is not the malicious creation of the antiscience mafia: Seifer's wizard is the real-life Nikola Tesla of AC transmission fame, inventor of fluorescent lighting and the induction motor. It was Tesla who turned Niagara Falls

    Amber88's avatar - praying hands.jpg
    KENTUCKY
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    Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:39 am - IP Logged

    very interesting...to say the least!

      Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
      Wyncote,Pa
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      Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:40 am - IP Logged

      Tesla had the remarkable talent of charming and astonishing his admirers while at the same time enraging his enemies; the phenomenon continues to the present day. It is unfortunate that, despite several current popular biographies, there still exists no definitive technical authority, other than his own scattered publications, to consult on the scientific issues of his intriguing and colorful scientific career. Consider the adulation bestowed upon him by Lord Kelvin, Hermann von Helmholtz, Sir William Crookes, Lord Rayleigh, Sir James Dewer, Robert Millikan, Sir James Fleming, B.A. Behrend, A.E. Kennally, L.W. Austin, W.H. Bragg, Ferdinand Braun, Jonathan Zenneck, E.W.E Alexanderson, J.S. Stone, Vannevar Bush, W.H. Eccles, Edwin H. Armstrong (who served as a pallbearer at Tesla's funeral, as did Alexanderson), and notably Albert Einstein*, Ernest Rutherford, Arthur Compton, and Neils Bohr. There are a number of Nobel laureates, Royal Society fellows, IEEE presidents and fellows, and university presidents in that collection. No one, since Franklin, had so stirred the scientific and engineering world

        Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
        Wyncote,Pa
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        Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:46 am - IP Logged

        To backtrack slightly, in May 1885, George Westinghouse purchased the patents to his induction motor, his polyphase system of alternating-current dynamos, transformers and motors and made this the basis of the Westinghouse power system which still underlies the modern electrical power industry today. When Westinghouse found that they could not stay in business if they paid him his due of Twelve Million Dollars, Tesla tore up the contract. Tesla did this, quite simply, so people could have the benefit of financially attainable electricity. Tesla made his first million before he was 40, but gave up the royalties on his most profitable invention as a humanitarian gesture. As a result, Westinghouse remained in business

          Amber88's avatar - praying hands.jpg
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          Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:47 am - IP Logged

          I can't quite think of the word I'm looking for, but there are some people that are so intelligent and so strange (at the same time) that it's scary, lol. But they can achieve the unthinkable. I'm sure that they don't think their behavior is strange. It's only strange to us...because we can't relate to it.

            Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
            Zeta Reticuli Star System
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            Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:52 am - IP Logged

            Savants?

            Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

            Lep

            There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

              Amber88's avatar - praying hands.jpg
              KENTUCKY
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              Posted: December 15, 2006, 2:57 am - IP Logged

              Savants?

              I'll take your word on that one, lol. Sounds good to me, if it means a genius with social phobias?????

                Blackapple's avatar - nw rogue2.jpg
                Wyncote,Pa
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                Posted: December 15, 2006, 3:11 am - IP Logged

                It proves we all are unique

                Where there is a will there is a way

                Born in St. Louis to Mary vos Savant and Joseph Mach, Marilyn opposes the tradition of children taking their father's surname, instead using her mother's maiden name. She attended Washington University, but dropped out to pursue a career in writing and investing.

                Marilyn's listing in the 1986 Guinness Book of World Records brought her widespread media attention. Among the periodicals profiling her was Parade, which followed its article with a selection of questions and her answers to them, the popularity of which launched a regular question-and-answer column, Ask Marilyn. In the column she solves mathematical and logical puzzles and answers questions on a wide range of subjects, including philosophy, physics, politics, education, and human nature, as well as responding to more traditional requests for self-help advice. The column has also provided a basis for many of her books.

                Marilyn lives in New York City with her husband, artificial-heart pioneer Robert Jarvik. She is the Chief Financial Officer of Jarvik Hear 

                 

                Savant skills occur within a narrow but constant range of human mental functions, generally in six areas: calendar calculating; lightening calculating & mathematical ability; art (drawing or sculpting); music (usually piano with perfect pitch); mechanical abilities; and spatial skills. In some instances unusual language abilities have been reported but those are rare. Other skills much less frequently reported include map memorizing, visual measurement, extrasensory perception, unusual sensory discrimination such as enhanced sense of touch & smell, and perfect appreciation passing time without knowledge of a clock face. The most common savant skill is musical ability. A regularly re-occurring triad of musical genius, blindness and autism is particularly striking in the world literature on this topic. Premature birth history is commonly reported in persons with Savant Syndrome.

                In some cases of Savant Syndrome a single special skill exists; in others there are several skills co-existing simultaneously. The skills tend to be right hemisphere in type — nonsymbolic, artistic, concrete, directly perceived — in contrast to left hemisphere type that tend to be more sequential, logical, and symbolic including language specialization.

                Whatever the special skills, they are always linked with phenomenal memory. That memory, however, is a special type — very narrow but exceedingly deep--within its narrow confines. Such memory is a type of "unconscious reckoning" — habit or procedural memory — which relies on more primitive circuitry (cortico-striatal)

                than higher level (cortico-limbic) cognitive or associative memory used more commonly and regularly in normal persons.

                 

                 

                 

                 

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