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How A Ryo-Catteau Machine Works

Topic closed. 6 replies. Last post 10 years ago by Wintariofan.

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Kingston, Ontario
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October 5, 2006
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Posted: January 6, 2007, 10:17 am - IP Logged

To ensure fairness and integrity in its winning numbers...and that nothing but random chance alone makes a lottery ticket a winner, Ontario and many provinces use the finest lottery machines made by Ryo-Catteau. Most countries have or use Ryo-Catteau equipment.  Our national lottery here in Canada, Lotto 6-49 and Super 7 use the "Tulipe" machine which is the brand name for that sytle. Great Britain's "NATIOANL' lottery does as well.

Made by a company in Wattrelos, France; Ryo-Catteau is the world's foremost producer of lottery equipment.  Not to knock the U-S manufacturers, but Baetel and Smartplay Inc. in the U-S, pale in comparison in the quality compared to Ryo-Catteau.  They are utmost.   

The machine itself is about four to five feet high, it sits on a stand that is roughly another three to four feet high.  It's on wheels so it can be easily stored away or brought into the lottery draw studio.  The machine, which ironically the public can buy is about $90,000.  When the machine is wheeled out, it is placed in front of the lottery set.  It is plugged into a wall socket, like the type you would use to  hook up your laundry-dryer. 

The machine is unique.  Ryo-Catteau's speciality is that when in operation, it mixes the balls thoroughly in a matter of seconds.  It only takes about five to ten seconds to get a thorough mix.  The machine is controlled by a controller that allows the lottery officials to control how many balls will be released based on the game being played that evening.  In the case of Lotto 6-49, seven balls are allowed to come out. 

The machine is always under heavy lock and key and so are the balls that are locked and stored in cases.  The case of balls is sealed with a plastec security tag. The tag/seal has a serial number on it that is recorded/checked whenever the sealed cases are opened.  Those tags have to reflect the security records.  If a tag is not what its supposed to be, someone is in trouble.  (grin) 

When the ball case is opened, there are 49 solid india rubber 55 mm balls.  Everyone of them are the same weight, diameter, density, and resilency.  The number on the ball is not merely painted on or inked into the ball.  The number is embedded into the rubber and is apart of the ball itself.  Each lottery ball cost $300, this set of 49 balls is $13,000.   

When the balls are placed into the rack of the machine, they are really put into a loader.  The  rack/loader usually sits slanted to the left side of the machine and the balls are introduced into the mixing drum by a slit on that same left side.  When the machine is turned on, it is operated by a draws official from Ontario lottery, who controls the basics...dropping of the balls, the fast mix, and stopping the machine.  The controller flips a switch that allows all the balls to fall into the machine. 

Ryo-Catteau's patent is the counter-rotating paddles or drums and the unique trap door at the base of machine.  That stationary base in the centre of the machine is called a crown.  It never moves and holds the trap door that swings open every few seconds allowing each ball to fall into the ball display.  After the controller/official starts the paddles, a second switch is turned on,  It's lets all the balls drop in. From there they go from a manual mode on the controller into a automatic mode.     

Balls mix quickly, and after about a ten second count when in its automatic mode, the Auditor/Trust Officer/the public's witness takes control and presses the button to activate the trap door.  Potential Canadians millionaires await each ball that falls hoping to be the next.  After the sixth ball falls, the controller takes back over and switches one more switch allowing the gate in the ball display to switch, so the bonus number has room to fall into into the ball display.  He then stops the machine when all seven balls are down.

According to officials, it only takes about minute and a half to do the draw.   

Now, the machines used for Ontario and Quebec games are called the "Lantana".  The difference is that the Lantana has no paddles, just it's two counter rotating drums that do the same thorough mix.  The patents and quality are the same, so you can be rest assured there is complete randomness in the process. 

Derek

Wintariofan  

    johnph77's avatar - avatar
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    Posted: January 6, 2007, 5:07 pm - IP Logged

    Interesting reading. Quoted from?

    That's a lot of expense, but evidently it assures the highest quality control and thus game integrity.

    gl

    j

    Blessed Saint Leibowitz, keep 'em dreamin' down there..... 

    Next week's convention for Psychics and Prognosticators has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

     =^.^=

      stavros's avatar - avatar 6898.gif
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      Posted: January 6, 2007, 5:41 pm - IP Logged

      Very Interesting read.  Much better than computerized draws!

      Good Luck!

      Stavros

       

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        Posted: January 6, 2007, 6:00 pm - IP Logged

        Some corrections:

        The UK National Lottery uses the "Criterion" by Smartplay (originally manufatured by Beitel, but Beitel has since been absorbed into Smartplay), not Ryo-Catteau's Tulipe as you had mentioned. In fact, all of the UK's machines are manufatured by Smartplay.

        Also, Quebec does not use the Lantana as you had mentioned, but is actually a loyal Smartplay client. The "Revolution" draws their unique Astro game, while the "Messenger" draws la Quotidienne, la Mini, and Extra. And finally, a "Halogen" paired with another "Messenger" draws the Joker game. I also believe Banco is drawn with a "Keno Criterion". The only game I'm unsure of how it's drawn is Quebec 49.

        (insert signature here)

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          Kingston, Ontario
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          Posted: January 7, 2007, 12:43 am - IP Logged

          Some corrections:

          The UK National Lottery uses the "Criterion" by Smartplay (originally manufatured by Beitel, but Beitel has since been absorbed into Smartplay), not Ryo-Catteau's Tulipe as you had mentioned. In fact, all of the UK's machines are manufatured by Smartplay.

          Also, Quebec does not use the Lantana as you had mentioned, but is actually a loyal Smartplay client. The "Revolution" draws their unique Astro game, while the "Messenger" draws la Quotidienne, la Mini, and Extra. And finally, a "Halogen" paired with another "Messenger" draws the Joker game. I also believe Banco is drawn with a "Keno Criterion". The only game I'm unsure of how it's drawn is Quebec 49.

          You are right Jimmy, I was typing this up early this monring and had forgot that Quebec switched from Ryo-Catteau a few years back.  All I remembered from the lottery broadcasts on TVA was the guy with the stop-watch and the Lantana machines in motion. Now they edit a shoter version of it together.  I miss the old routine.  Those new machines you mentioned are quite neat.  Often wondered how the mxing process worked when the balls are whizzing around instead of bouncing all over the place during the la mini, la quotidienne, and extra. 

          As far as England, I know they had about 11 different machines which I thought were Ryo-Catteau.  They weren't.  I always laughed at the human-names they gave each machine....Merlin, Arthur, Galahad, Vyvyan, Lancelot, Garnet, Topaz, Opal, Amethyst, Moonstone and Pearl.   

          And yes, the Quebec 49 is still drawn using the Lantana machine.  One of the reasons some lottery corporations may not use Ryo-Catteau is that its very expensive for parts and in comparision with beitel/smartplay.   

          BTW, I have sat in on some Ontario's lottery draws and get a lot of my information from the guys in the draws department, we're always exchanging information, facts and fascinated by the new stuff coming out.  My dream is to be a lottery draws co-ordinator.  I already have a real set of lottery balls numbered 0 to 9 that was given to me after the travelling lottery Wintario ended its travels.  They are 70 mm balls, larger than the ones used in Super 7/Lotto 6-49.  If I put them in the dryer, they are very loud, unhealthy for the dryer, but to the contrary I can do my own Pick 3 draws ...lol

          Thanks for your input...

          Derek

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            Posted: January 7, 2007, 1:06 am - IP Logged

            You are right Jimmy, I was typing this up early this monring and had forgot that Quebec switched from Ryo-Catteau a few years back.  All I remembered from the lottery broadcasts on TVA was the guy with the stop-watch and the Lantana machines in motion. Now they edit a shoter version of it together.  I miss the old routine.  Those new machines you mentioned are quite neat.  Often wondered how the mxing process worked when the balls are whizzing around instead of bouncing all over the place during the la mini, la quotidienne, and extra. 

            As far as England, I know they had about 11 different machines which I thought were Ryo-Catteau.  They weren't.  I always laughed at the human-names they gave each machine....Merlin, Arthur, Galahad, Vyvyan, Lancelot, Garnet, Topaz, Opal, Amethyst, Moonstone and Pearl.   

            And yes, the Quebec 49 is still drawn using the Lantana machine.  One of the reasons some lottery corporations may not use Ryo-Catteau is that its very expensive for parts and in comparision with beitel/smartplay.   

            BTW, I have sat in on some Ontario's lottery draws and get a lot of my information from the guys in the draws department, we're always exchanging information, facts and fascinated by the new stuff coming out.  My dream is to be a lottery draws co-ordinator.  I already have a real set of lottery balls numbered 0 to 9 that was given to me after the travelling lottery Wintario ended its travels.  They are 70 mm balls, larger than the ones used in Super 7/Lotto 6-49.  If I put them in the dryer, they are very loud, unhealthy for the dryer, but to the contrary I can do my own Pick 3 draws ...lol

            Thanks for your input...

            Derek

            You got a sweet deal.

            By the way, how do they do the Quebec 49 with a Lantana? I thought those could only draw one number at a time. 

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              Kingston, Ontario
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              Posted: January 7, 2007, 8:01 am - IP Logged

              You got a sweet deal.

              By the way, how do they do the Quebec 49 with a Lantana? I thought those could only draw one number at a time. 

              Actually Jimmy, you can instruct the lottery machine via a controller on how many balls you want/need for a game.  You can choose from 1 ball to drop up to 10 balls.  In the case of Quebec 49, Ontario 49 or any game that requires seven balls, the controller himself/an official tells the machine to allow seven balls to fall.  Here in Ontario, OLG's draws gurus Dave Giles and Jock Fairclough use one machine for all games.  Pick 3, Pick 4, Encore use one set of balls 0 to 9, one machine.  After the first digit is out, they record it, reload it and mix it back in.  The then they draw the second digit and so on etc....until the get the required number of balls.

              I have a equation for you ... use Encore a seven digit number as the example.  Since they are not using seven machines with seven different sets of balls.  Are the chances the same using one machine for all seven digits to get 0000000 after reinrodcuing the ball after each ball drop.  Or by using seven machines to get a number from each one better ?  I asked Dave that one day, and he said like flipping a coin-- it's the same.  However, I am stuck between the reintroducing of one number coming up seven times.  I am also noting that every time they are mixed it's one in 10.  hmmm   

              If you want you can email Xavier at Ryo-Catteau and he can send you out a cd-rom that shows them manufacturing and all about the ryo-catteau machines.  You can look them up on  here ryo-catteau.  coooom  I have a disk and it's awesome !  The U-S wholesaler who irionically also sells beitel/smartplay equipment is Garron Plastics Inc., out of Balitmore.  The Canadian wholesaler is BABN out of Montreal.  yes, the public can buy this equipment.  Imagine having and owning the real thing.