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How much an attorney charge to claim lottery prize $25 Mil?

Topic closed. 18 replies. Last post 8 years ago by JWBlue.

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San Diego, CA
United States
Member #58386
February 12, 2008
287 Posts
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Posted: January 10, 2009, 8:48 pm - IP Logged

If you win a $25 mil jackpot it would be benefit you to find an attorney who has dealt with lottery winners before.  That way they know what they are doing.  Furthermore, you get what you pay for and buyer beware. Wink

Why?  What benefit does the attorney give you?

Spend $50.00 on the lottery software or pay an attorney thousands for basically nothing.

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    NY
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    Member #23835
    October 16, 2005
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    Posted: January 11, 2009, 2:55 am - IP Logged

    A lawyer gives you the benefit of objectivity, specialized knowledge, as well as simply doing the grunt work. The charge for the grunt work is probably even more overpriced than what your mechanic charges for a 99 cent sparkplug. The value of the knowledge depends on what you know (or can learn), and the cost of a mistake. In general a lawyer can't do anything you can't do yourself, but most people don't know how to do most of the things lawyers do, or at least won't do it as well.  Sometimes that won't matter and sometimes it will. The important questions are how likely are you to make a mistake, and how much will that mistake cost. How much a lawyer costs isn't important until you know the answers to the first two questons.

    FWIW, remember that in the thread on the Piqua winners you suggested a pool contract that would have been held to be invalid if it was challenged. Depending on how others things went, that could potentially reduce shares drastically. I'd say it was an easily avoidable error that was common sense, and didn't require any legal knowledge. At the same time, I certainly wouldn't suggest paying a lawyer to write a pool contract, since your chances of winning are so slim. If you were potentially risking real millions on your ability to get something with rigorous legal requirements right in favor of saving a few thousand bucks, I'd suggest you're probably making a very poor choice.

      LEELEESMOMMY's avatar - Lottery-017.jpg
      NEW YORK
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      Member #66834
      November 8, 2008
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      Posted: January 11, 2009, 10:27 am - IP Logged

      I am an attorney and it all depends on what you need the attorney for and how much time will go into it - Yes, you can set up a revocable trust on line - BUT 9 out of 10 times those programs dont answer REAL questions for your individual situation... what is reasonable based on the size of the jackpot is not important- it all depends on the quality of the work and the ability to provide a service that fits your needs...good luck

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        San Diego, CA
        United States
        Member #58386
        February 12, 2008
        287 Posts
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        Posted: January 11, 2009, 2:08 pm - IP Logged

        I am an attorney and it all depends on what you need the attorney for and how much time will go into it - Yes, you can set up a revocable trust on line - BUT 9 out of 10 times those programs dont answer REAL questions for your individual situation... what is reasonable based on the size of the jackpot is not important- it all depends on the quality of the work and the ability to provide a service that fits your needs...good luck

        If the sole purpose of creating the recovable trust is to claim a jackpot anonymously, then a $50.00 software program is fine. 

         

        MAYBE an attorney would be good if you are creating a trust for any other reason.