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Identity Withheld Identity Revealed

Topic closed. 24 replies. Last post 8 years ago by KY Floyd.

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DO I HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW WHO YOU ARE?

YES [ 5 ]  [6.85%]
NO [ 63 ]  [86.30%]
MAYBE SO [ 5 ]  [6.85%]
Total Valid Votes [ 73 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 0 ]  
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New Member
New Jersey
United States
Member #79460
September 1, 2009
5 Posts
Offline
Posted: September 7, 2009, 3:10 pm - IP Logged

I posted here before, read some of the horror stories. I'm going to find out if my state allows you to be anonymous if you win the lotto. It really should be a choice. If I won and everyone knew, it would be trouble because I know who would come to me for a handout. If you have relatives who are spendthrifts you know what im talking about. I really believe that when you play the lotto you must have a written out plan of what you will do with the winnings and how you will take care of yourself first. for me I would get a better healthcare plan, and set up a retirement fund, things that people don't see. getting a good lawyer for advice is another important must do before you go claiming your winnings. I would then take a deep breath and take it easy and pay off my debt and get things done. doing this is nobodies business but mine, and I would not tell anybody cause I know what will happen. I already planned out what I would buy and none of it is flashy, mostly needs, a suv not an escalade maybe a ford escape. my most important goal is to be financially secure. I never had the desire to show off. but I would take better care of myself.

I have always found it odd about the American way of thinking of living for today, but. when it comes to money you got to think a bit about tomorrow. If I had not been a saver I would be in a mess right now cause I'm sporadically employed now. It hurts to have the rep of being a cheap miser tightwad. I don't buy things on credit card cause I want to keep my balances low. So I can see why the majority of lotto winners lose everything, we are taught to spend and if you say no to the bigger car and bigger house you can buy on credit, something is wrong with you. you are a miser, etc. no one wants to here that, its ingrained in us to be the best and have the best. anything less and you are a loser. So what happens, our country is in debt, stores are closing all over the place, and we can't afford healthcare, and have become spending addicts.

    justxploring's avatar - villiarna
    Wandering Aimlessly
    United States
    Member #25360
    November 5, 2005
    4461 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: September 8, 2009, 2:21 am - IP Logged

    Yes, you have a right to know who I am, because those are the rules.  Period. 

    No, I really wouldn't want anyone to know, but since I choose to play in a state where I won't have anonymity should I win ANY amount (not just a jackpot) I guess there's nothing I can do about it.

    The bottom line is that it's a game and it's voluntary.  If someone doesn't like the rules, then he/she doesn't have to play.

      djklaugh's avatar - Lottery-031.jpg
      Portland,Oregon
      United States
      Member #14387
      April 25, 2005
      229 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: September 8, 2009, 11:07 pm - IP Logged

      I suppose if you live in a state where identity disclosure is required by state law, you could always file for a name change prior to collecting a big lottery win .... then change it back a few months later .... just call me FriendofLP14648

      Djklaugh

        Some things have to be believed to be seen.

      "I have not failed. I have just found ten thousand things that don't work".  Thomas Edison

        Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
        Zeta Reticuli Star System
        United States
        Member #30470
        January 17, 2006
        10476 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: September 9, 2009, 12:21 am - IP Logged

        What if you've already signed the ticket?

        Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

        Lep

        There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

          Texas Joey's avatar - Lottery-009.jpg
          Katy, Tx
          United States
          Member #67709
          December 3, 2008
          204 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: September 16, 2009, 1:58 am - IP Logged

          I think everyone is entitled to privacy if they want it.  No one should be forced to identify themselve to outsiders.  My Lawyer is my best friend in that situation.  He is my voice and ears for any questions about my wins.  Bad things happen to those who don't take precautions with mouth about winnings.  Look at that Man in Kentucky who carried a brief case in his care worth 10,000 dollars and left in an unlocked vehicle.  Some folks just never learn.

          Lots of Luck and Happiness

          JoeyDoh

            Avatar
            New Member

            United States
            Member #79253
            August 29, 2009
            2 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: September 16, 2009, 12:31 pm - IP Logged

            What I think many people have a tendency to forget is that the MAJORITY of people, meaning people who don't follow the lottery and people who don't post on sites like this, wouldn't really know what the winner looks like, or care. And even if they read the paper and watch the winner on the 11 o'clock news, they eventually forget about them.  If someone wins and they decide to move to London, England, they could live in absolute anonymity since practically no one over there would know who they are. Or if a winner in NY decides to move to LA, people in California wouldn't know who they are. Their anonymity is retained.

            The idea of lost anonymity is blown completely out of proportion. It's a little strange to assume that EVERYONE knows who you are just because you won the state lottery, when in actuality most people forget who you are amidst the hustle and bustle of daily life. If you're a lottery addict, I can see how one could confuse their knowledge for the knowledge of millions of other everyday people who don't care about such things.

              DC81's avatar - batman39
              MI
              United States
              Member #54830
              August 31, 2007
              985 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: September 16, 2009, 11:12 pm - IP Logged

              Yeah until someone does a search on their search engine of choice and finds your name and the press release and then the gossip starts or the cons show up and you get sacks of mail from people writing letters. It's not about the average, apathetic person.

              It only takes one person opening their mouth for gossip to snowball into something bigger. Again, it's not the majority that's the problem.

              You can't predict random.

                Avatar
                NY
                United States
                Member #23835
                October 16, 2005
                3576 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: September 17, 2009, 1:19 am - IP Logged

                "Yeah until someone does a search on their search engine of choice and finds your name and the press release"

                First, how much time do you spend doing searches on neighbors and strangers? Even so, if finding your name and a press release allows people to find *you* you're almost certainly the type of moron who wouldn't have been any better off if you'd been allowed to remain anonymous. Who are the first people we think of when we look for lottery winners who turned out to be major losers? Jack Whittaker and David Edwards? Tell me about a problem either of them had that they didn't bring on themselves. If Whittaker hadn't won the lottery, but still went to bars with 500k in a briefcase in his car, the only thing that would have hapened differently, is that the story would have been in fewer newspapers.

                "No one should be forced to identify themselve to outsiders."

                Lottery winners aren't forced to identify themselves to outsiders, or anyone else. It's a strictly voluntary choice. Nobody will force you to claim the prize under the rules you agreed to when you bought the ticket.

                  DC81's avatar - batman39
                  MI
                  United States
                  Member #54830
                  August 31, 2007
                  985 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: September 19, 2009, 2:09 am - IP Logged

                  "Yeah until someone does a search on their search engine of choice and finds your name and the press release"

                  First, how much time do you spend doing searches on neighbors and strangers? Even so, if finding your name and a press release allows people to find *you* you're almost certainly the type of moron who wouldn't have been any better off if you'd been allowed to remain anonymous. Who are the first people we think of when we look for lottery winners who turned out to be major losers? Jack Whittaker and David Edwards? Tell me about a problem either of them had that they didn't bring on themselves. If Whittaker hadn't won the lottery, but still went to bars with 500k in a briefcase in his car, the only thing that would have hapened differently, is that the story would have been in fewer newspapers.

                  "No one should be forced to identify themselve to outsiders."

                  Lottery winners aren't forced to identify themselves to outsiders, or anyone else. It's a strictly voluntary choice. Nobody will force you to claim the prize under the rules you agreed to when you bought the ticket.

                  I personally don't spend any time doing that but there are A LOT of people who do, obviously you likely won't be looking for a job but many employers do it as part of a background check now, never underestimate the curiosity and flat out nosiness of people. You've missed the point, tell me if YOU had the option of anonymity would you or would you not take it? Oh sure, just because your name and that photo of you with the big dumb smile on your face holding a novelty check is going to going to be spread over the internet and will likely be online forever doesn't mean you'll ever have someone you've met in whatever area you've moved to come across it after looking up your name on a boring, rainy afternoon. Then there are those who for some reason don't move out of their current communities but nether the less, you WILL be a target if your name is out there. Do you really think it's difficult for someone who's interested in finding you to actually do so?

                  Of course David and Jack's problems were largely self caused but once again that isn't the point. They made spectacles of themselves, they put themselves in the spotlight and continued to do so with their stupidity (though apparently Jack had left large sums of money in his vehicles before he won) but that doesn't mean the people didn't come out of the woodwork looking for their piece and would have even if everything that happened to them and their families didn't. Personally along with everything else the other thing I learned from them and other "lottery losers" is to keep your face out of the spotlight.

                  Yeah, if you have to do the press conference to receive the cash, so be it because then it's hello name change!  But you'd be a fool to not see what your options were before doing so putting your goofy mug in front of the cameras.

                  You can't predict random.

                    Avatar
                    NY
                    United States
                    Member #23835
                    October 16, 2005
                    3576 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: September 19, 2009, 3:12 am - IP Logged

                    "You've missed the point"

                    I'd say you've missed the point.

                    "Do you really think it's difficult for someone who's interested in finding you to actually do so?"

                    Yes, if you don't want to be found. What would you do if you won? Go to the press conference looking exactly as you've looked for the last 5 years? Get a landline and put your name in the phone book, and then put your name on your mailbox with 3" letters? Just as an exercise you might try googling some of the people you know. Normal people who aren't trying to be inconspicuous often have little or no web presence.

                    I'm also rather skeptical that very many people are going to be doing random google searches on their neighbors or people they meet in relatively normal situations. Old flames, people from school, former coworkers? Sure. Random people who don't give them a good reason? Not likely. The occasional nutjob? Sure, but how many of them do you think you'd be interacting with? The only realistic threat would be from people who know your real name, have some motivation to google you, and find a reference identifying you as a lottery winner. That might be a problem in paranoid fantasies, but in the realworld of somebody who wants to keep alow profile (and isn't an idiot), it's just not very likely.

                    "you'd be a fool to not see what your options were before doing so putting your goofy mug in front of the cameras."

                    Not considering your options in any serious endeavor makes you a fool. Living in NY, my practical options don't include claiming anonymously or playing in a state where that's allowed. I'm certainly not going to waste my time worrying about what I can't change just because there's an incredibly slim chance that I might win a jackpot. If I should happen to win, having my name and a picture of me from a press conference easily available to people won't be a problem at all. I won't look the same, and I won't be living in the place the lottery told people I lived. The DMV, the IRS, and a few financial institutions will know where my legal residence is. Some friends and family will have a working phone number and know where I'll be found when I'm at home. It's very unlikely that anyone else will be able to locate me, even if they're willing to go to a lot of trouble. Above all, I won't look rich, or like I'm an easy target for somebody looking for an easy mark.