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Lottery tickets are bearer documents

Topic closed. 16 replies. Last post 3 years ago by Stack47.

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Posted: August 27, 2013, 1:40 pm - IP Logged

So when you win and you have to go to the headquarters to cash it in meaning it was over $600...If you did not purchase the ticket but you say found it and signed your name to it, does it mean they will hunt down the actual purchaser of the ticket, and if in fact they do that and find the actual purchaser will they then have to split it with you since you signed your name to it? Or is it all moot and they just pay you the winnings since you signed and turned it in...which is what I think, but does anybody know for sure?

    Greg2117's avatar - Lottery-035.jpg
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    Posted: August 27, 2013, 2:00 pm - IP Logged

    So when you win and you have to go to the headquarters to cash it in meaning it was over $600...If you did not purchase the ticket but you say found it and signed your name to it, does it mean they will hunt down the actual purchaser of the ticket, and if in fact they do that and find the actual purchaser will they then have to split it with you since you signed your name to it? Or is it all moot and they just pay you the winnings since you signed and turned it in...which is what I think, but does anybody know for sure?

    Good question. I'm not sure, but according to the lotto officials, you are responsible for keeping your ticket(s) safe and sigining it. If you say you found the ticket, which I personally wouldn't do, and the only way to prove who bought the ticket is to go over security cameras from the store. Plus it would be difficult to find the acutall person who bought the ticket unless they come forward. And they might not even know they bought the winning ticket since they lost it. So you will probaly end up getting the money if no one comes forward and invlove the police.


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      Posted: August 27, 2013, 2:12 pm - IP Logged

      I turn in scratch offs for second chance prizes


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        Posted: August 27, 2013, 2:50 pm - IP Logged

        Bearer instrument means just that. If you lose it, whoever finds it can legally cash it in after signing it whether there was a camera shot of the original purchaser or not.

        If that was not the case, the officials wouldn't bother writing that on the ticket.

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          Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:21 am - IP Logged

          Bearer instrument means just that. If you lose it, whoever finds it can legally cash it in after signing it whether there was a camera shot of the original purchaser or not.

          If that was not the case, the officials wouldn't bother writing that on the ticket.

          It's a really interesting debate because courts made rulings on whom was the legal owner. I'm not saying it's one way or the other, but if "finders keepers" is the law, why do courts even hear the cases?

            noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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            Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:32 am - IP Logged

            It's a really interesting debate because courts made rulings on whom was the legal owner. I'm not saying it's one way or the other, but if "finders keepers" is the law, why do courts even hear the cases?

            Which raises another question Stack- do the courts hear  cases  where the original owner had signed the back of the ticket and then lost it? In which case does the " finder" have any legal grounds in retaining the ticket? Would the court rule that the original owner somehow " reward" the " finder keeper" or does the FK get absolutely nothing.

            Does the FK somehow get labeled a Thief?

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              Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:36 am - IP Logged

              So when you win and you have to go to the headquarters to cash it in meaning it was over $600...If you did not purchase the ticket but you say found it and signed your name to it, does it mean they will hunt down the actual purchaser of the ticket, and if in fact they do that and find the actual purchaser will they then have to split it with you since you signed your name to it? Or is it all moot and they just pay you the winnings since you signed and turned it in...which is what I think, but does anybody know for sure?

              If the claims form requires the bearer to declare under the penalty of perjury that no other person is entitled to any part of payment, I'm wondering if the bearer can legally and truthfully declare it when they didn't purchase the ticket. If the lottery does try to hunt down the actual purchaser, it is because the lottery believes someone else may be entitled to all of the payment.

              Any real lawyers members of LP?

                noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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                Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:44 am - IP Logged

                Bearer instrument means just that. If you lose it, whoever finds it can legally cash it in after signing it whether there was a camera shot of the original purchaser or not.

                If that was not the case, the officials wouldn't bother writing that on the ticket.

                What if the ticket was already signed by the original owner - who somehow lost it at say a picnic in a park? If the new ticket bearer were to attempt to cash it- do they end up in jail after legitimately finding it?

                Another Question: Does the Lottery Commission stress that should a lost ticket be found- that the person in possession of this lost ticket- now  RETURN ticket to the lottery Commission? 


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                  Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:47 am - IP Logged

                  It's a really interesting debate because courts made rulings on whom was the legal owner. I'm not saying it's one way or the other, but if "finders keepers" is the law, why do courts even hear the cases?

                  We'd have to see the specifics of each of those cases. It could be like the case where a woman I saw in a store surveillance video a few months ago on Youtube, who was standing behind a guy on line and the guy dropped a wad of cash. He didn't know he dropped it, and the lady grabbed the cash off the floor and took off. I forget the amount but it was about 1,200 or so. The lady was eventually identified and arrested.

                  There may be gray areas that I'm not aware of. If you see the person drop it and don't tell them, then some code of morality might be the final word from the judge, who knows. I highly doubt someone would get into trouble in the courts if they were just walking down the street and saw a ticket or money on the ground and took it. There would be no way to find the person in either case, unless the signature on the ticket was legible enough.

                  Years ago i was coming home from work and went into a deli to buy a sandwhich. The tables were practically all occupied along the pathway leading to the counter. There was a 100 dollar bill folded in half about a foot away from the counter. I was amazed no one saw it lying there in plain sight. I took out a few bills from my pocket and dropped them so it wouldn't cause any attention by me bending over to pick up a C-note. I grabbed the C-note along with my bills and walked out of there.

                  I don't think anyone in their right mind would take the C-note and announce to everyone asking whether they lost it. I'm sure just about everyone's hand would've been raised. lol

                  I think the bearer instrument notice on the ticket is just to let the people who may not be aware, and inform them of what could happen. There isn't enough room on the ticket to go into lengthy details regarding all the possible and rare exceptions to the rule.


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                    Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:51 am - IP Logged

                    What if the ticket was already signed by the original owner - who somehow lost it at say a picnic in a park? If the new ticket bearer were to attempt to cash it- do they end up in jail after legitimately finding it?

                    Another Question: Does the Lottery Commission stress that should a lost ticket be found- that the person in possession of this lost ticket- now  RETURN ticket to the lottery Commission? 

                    I'm no lawyer, but I think most of this stuff is common sense, except for some rare exceptions.

                    If the original owner already signed it, then of course it's illegal for the finder to redeem the ticket, since he/she has to sign the ticket to redeem it if it's worth over 599.

                    I believe the OP is talking about a ticket that isn't signed.

                      noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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                      Posted: August 28, 2013, 12:55 am - IP Logged

                      I'm no lawyer, but I think most of this stuff is common sense, except for some rare exceptions.

                      If the original owner already signed it, then of course it's illegal for the finder to redeem the ticket, since he/she has to sign the ticket to redeem it if it's worth over 599.

                      I believe the OP is talking about a ticket that isn't signed.

                      Fascinating..

                      How many signatures can go on the back of the ticket? What if the " finder Keeper" added his/her's to the Original signature- does that make the ticket null & void?


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                        Posted: August 28, 2013, 1:07 am - IP Logged

                        Fascinating..

                        How many signatures can go on the back of the ticket? What if the " finder Keeper" added his/her's to the Original signature- does that make the ticket null & void?

                        I believe there's only space for one signature. Any attempt in augmenting the signature to look like theirs would be a very foolish thing to do, especially when he/she has to be there in person to redeem the ticket.

                        Any suspicion by the clerk could get them into trouble. The person would be a total idiot to self incriminate themselves like that. They also have to show identification, so If it was me, I'd put an ad on Craigslist and hope someone would see it and hopefully find it in their heart to give me a 15% finder's fee. Big Grin

                        But the second problem would be for the claimer to prove they were the original purchaser. They'd have to write their signature on a piece of paper without looking at the signature on the ticket. If it matched, then we'd take a trip together to the claims office. lol

                          noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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                          Posted: August 28, 2013, 1:33 am - IP Logged

                          I believe there's only space for one signature. Any attempt in augmenting the signature to look like theirs would be a very foolish thing to do, especially when he/she has to be there in person to redeem the ticket.

                          Any suspicion by the clerk could get them into trouble. The person would be a total idiot to self incriminate themselves like that. They also have to show identification, so If it was me, I'd put an ad on Craigslist and hope someone would see it and hopefully find it in their heart to give me a 15% finder's fee. Big Grin

                          But the second problem would be for the claimer to prove they were the original purchaser. They'd have to write their signature on a piece of paper without looking at the signature on the ticket. If it matched, then we'd take a trip together to the claims office. lol

                          Which brings up the question: In a lottery pool, whose signature goes in the so called "Single Line" should they win?


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                            Posted: August 28, 2013, 7:23 am - IP Logged

                            Which brings up the question: In a lottery pool, whose signature goes in the so called "Single Line" should they win?

                            Yeah I thought everyone had to sign the ticket who had claim to it...you can scrunch up and sign 100 names to it cause no way Im lettingjust one person's signature represent me and I can sign my own name


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                              Posted: August 28, 2013, 7:25 am - IP Logged

                              Fascinating..

                              How many signatures can go on the back of the ticket? What if the " finder Keeper" added his/her's to the Original signature- does that make the ticket null & void?

                              I thought everyone who signed it got a cut of the money an equal cut, that why in my original post I asked if the finder signed their name but was not the original purchaser wouldnt they also get a cut if they did or even did not find the original purchaser