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Can lottery organizations control the location of jackpot winning tickets?

Topic closed. 6 replies. Last post 3 years ago by d1nnl2.

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San Diego, CA
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Posted: December 23, 2013, 10:09 am - IP Logged

I am sure they can control when they are released.


What about where they are released?

    Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
    Los Angeles, California
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    Posted: December 23, 2013, 12:01 pm - IP Logged

    I am sure they can control when they are released.


    What about where they are released?

    Can they? Anything is possible. Somebody somewhere along the line knows where they are.

    But are they? I don't believe so. The more people that know where they are, the more potential for abuse and fraud. There have been cases in the past of internal/security people engaging in this activity. But I don't believe it is widespread.

    You can check out some of my previous maps of Scratch Ticket Winners to see how the winners are spread out:

    http://www.lotterypost.com/thread/257573

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      San Diego, CA
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      Posted: December 23, 2013, 12:12 pm - IP Logged

      What about a general location as opposed to a specific store?  That would prevent fraud.

        LottoMetro's avatar - Lottery-024.jpg
        Happyland
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        Posted: December 23, 2013, 12:39 pm - IP Logged

        Sure, but they tend to avoid being 'specific' as this takes away from the randomness of the game. Depending on the size of the state, they usually have several distribution centers. To prevent all the tickets from ending up in one area they will spread them out among the distribution centers. They really can't control which zip code or stores get which prizes because retailers replenish inventory randomly. I have seen two jackpot tickets sold the same week at stores across the street from each other before and thought that was crazy, but no manipulation occured.

        If the chances of winning the jackpot are so slim, why play when the jackpot is so small? Your chances never change, but the potential payoff does.
        If a crystal ball showed you the future of the rest of your life, and in that future you will never win a jackpot, would you still play?

        2016: -48.28% (13 tickets) ||
        P&L % = Total Win($)/Total Wager($) - 1

          Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
          Los Angeles, California
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          Posted: December 23, 2013, 7:05 pm - IP Logged

          Response to good info from mrcraft in JWBlue's double-post in other thread:

          http://www.lotterypost.com/thread/250725/3401688

          ... there are many layers of checks and balances to ensure integrity of its scratchers, and in order to perpetuate fraud (e.g., sending your friends to buy entire rolls of tickets at specific retailers to win top prizes) you need at least 6 people from the gaming company and lottery office participating in the conspiracy to pull it off.

          And yeah, that famous incident of inside job Scratch fraud you mentioned here:

          http://www.lotterypost.com/thread/250725/3401978

          That's what I was referring to also. (don't know where to dig it up from just now)

          The thing with these official statements from lottery officials, about how secure everything is, and how many layers of security they have, yada, yada. Is that's just the basic "front door attack" that they are quoting.

          Kind of reminds you of so many of those heist/theft movies like Oceans 11/12/13 or Die Hard or the recent Now You See Me. What appears to be the multitude of hindrances to the theft is not how the theft is actually performed. They invariably find a way to circumvent and bypass some of those protections so they never even have to deal with them in the first place.

          Regarding the famous scratch fraud incident, I only remember hearing about the 1 lottery security guy inside, and his stupid friend/accomplice outside. There weren't 5 other inside accomplices. Just him. Maybe someone else has more info on it.

            Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
            Los Angeles, California
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            Posted: December 23, 2013, 7:57 pm - IP Logged

            Found it: (William Foreman)

            http://www.lotterypost.com/news/127545

            But there are two issues here: What are law abiding lottery employees doing in normal practice/procedure, versus what are criminal lottery employees potentially doing.

            The more specificity and targeting the lottery employs in the distribution of tickets,(if any) the more they open up the possibility of criminal fraud to take place by lottery (or vendor/distributor) employees like William Foreman.

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              CHERRY HILL, NJ
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              Posted: December 23, 2013, 8:30 pm - IP Logged

              Sure, but they tend to avoid being 'specific' as this takes away from the randomness of the game. Depending on the size of the state, they usually have several distribution centers. To prevent all the tickets from ending up in one area they will spread them out among the distribution centers. They really can't control which zip code or stores get which prizes because retailers replenish inventory randomly. I have seen two jackpot tickets sold the same week at stores across the street from each other before and thought that was crazy, but no manipulation occured.

              At least in NJ, their list is specific as to which store the winner was sold to. This led somebody who got access to the list to chase the winning tickets to the store location. I believe they had only $1,000 with them but they managed to get to the store and buy the whole roll. Too bad for them, they were not too smart because they got their relatives or friends to cash the winners for them, a red flag.

              Somebody who worked from the South where the tickets are done once posted in Lottery Forum and discussed the mechanics of how they are printed. I cannot believe that the winners are printed together with the non-winners. If the tickets are sold in sequential order and the computer randomizer, allocates the winners at the end, then there's a high chance the winners will not get sold before the game expires.

              So I believe, the winners are identified and separated from the rest and its release is controlled at the discretion of a God within the lottery office. Where it goes and when it goes out is determined by whim more than by a control list to ensure prizes are evenly distributed across the whole state. I think there is bias on which areas gets more winners. And the bias I think comes from this Lottery God.

              Which is why I keep track of sequence numbers, especially if the tickets are sold over the counter. You can kind of track them and I find out of sequence rolls suspicious. Hey, that may be the winning roll? Or maybe not.