Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 6, 2016, 12:39 am
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Do you have the rights to all the systems or workouts you shared on lottery post

Topic closed. 9 replies. Last post 3 years ago by LottoBux.

Page 1 of 1
41
PrintE-mailLink
Duchess69's avatar - Lottery-051.jpg

United States
Member #109074
April 5, 2011
3519 Posts
Offline
Posted: March 15, 2014, 11:26 pm - IP Logged

feed back please

Keep smiling  keep Sun Smiley knowing you can't always count on me forsure that's what friends are for.....

    Avatar
    Kentucky
    United States
    Member #32652
    February 14, 2006
    7308 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: March 15, 2014, 11:50 pm - IP Logged

    Having the rights to a system or workout is the same as having the rights to the numbers they produce. You could get a copyright or trademark on the name of a system, but you can't get the ownership of numbers.

      mrcraft's avatar - images3lp4 zps7dbb4a10.jpg
      Los Angeles, California
      United States
      Member #149492
      December 2, 2013
      919 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: March 16, 2014, 12:20 am - IP Logged

      My two cents, non-attorney speaking.  Once a system or workout is shared here on Lottery Post, the audience (both members and guests) can do whatever they please.  They can modify, share with others, use freely, etc.  I'm not sure what kind of rights you're thinking of retaining.

        duckman's avatar - ducklogodrake64x64
        Jacksonville Florida
        United States
        Member #23018
        October 6, 2005
        916 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: March 16, 2014, 12:21 am - IP Logged

        The name of the lottery system could receive trademark protection (copyright does not usually apply to names). The lottery system components (software for example) may be eligible to receive a patent (it may or may not be subject to patent depending on exactly what we are talking about).

        The actual factual results of a lottery system (example: cash 3 number sets) cannot be protected by copyright, trademark, or patent.

        What could protect someone from having results published elsewhere is a valid contract between the owner of the lottery system and the users of it. For example if you agreed not to disclose something and then you did disclose it where you are not permitted to, that would be a contractual violation and subject to the terms of the contract. This would have to be something that both parties officially agreed to.


          United States
          Member #128790
          June 2, 2012
          5431 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: March 16, 2014, 12:29 am - IP Logged

          feed back please

          I'm interested in the reason why you would even ask this question in the first place. The answer is so obvious. lol

          Why would you claim rights to something you shared publicly? Sure you can claim bragging rights, but once you put something out there and don't charge, it's a free-for-all. (No Pun Intended)

            RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
            mid-Ohio
            United States
            Member #9
            March 24, 2001
            19825 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: March 16, 2014, 12:47 am - IP Logged

            If you want to maintain the rights and benifits of your ideas then you should keep them to yourself.

             * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
               
                         Evil Looking       

              hearsetrax's avatar - 0118

              United States
              Member #52345
              May 21, 2007
              2657 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: March 16, 2014, 7:39 am - IP Logged

              If you want to maintain the rights and benifits of your ideas then you should keep them to yourself.

              that or file a patent Big Grin

                Artist77's avatar - batman14

                United States
                Member #121745
                January 16, 2012
                4788 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: March 16, 2014, 8:08 am - IP Logged

                The name of the lottery system could receive trademark protection (copyright does not usually apply to names). The lottery system components (software for example) may be eligible to receive a patent (it may or may not be subject to patent depending on exactly what we are talking about).

                The actual factual results of a lottery system (example: cash 3 number sets) cannot be protected by copyright, trademark, or patent.

                What could protect someone from having results published elsewhere is a valid contract between the owner of the lottery system and the users of it. For example if you agreed not to disclose something and then you did disclose it where you are not permitted to, that would be a contractual violation and subject to the terms of the contract. This would have to be something that both parties officially agreed to.

                Amen. I was just about to type the same info.  I doubt players will sign non-disclosure agreements, especially with penalties for violations.

                But don't expect patent protection if you have already disclosed the system in a public manner.

                J'aime La France.

                  Avatar
                  new jersey
                  United States
                  Member #150815
                  December 31, 2013
                  513 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: March 16, 2014, 10:37 am - IP Logged

                    FIRST  PAY  THE  MONEY  FOR  THE  PATENT,   SECOND  TO  FIGHT  YOUR  PATENT IF  SOMEONE USES  IT,  PAY  MORE  FOR  LAWYERS  ITS  NOT  WORTH  THE   TIME  OR  MONEY,  BECAUSE EVERYTHING  IS   RANDOM   NO   SYSTEM,   JUST  A  SEARCH  HISTORY  IS  BEST  SYSTEM IN  YOUR  STATE,   THKS   AND   GREAT   LUCK!!!!!@@##@

                    LottoBux's avatar - 2elh5if
                    Ontario
                    Canada
                    Member #109243
                    April 9, 2011
                    31437 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: March 16, 2014, 10:43 am - IP Logged

                    I'm interested in the reason why you would even ask this question in the first place. The answer is so obvious. lol

                    Why would you claim rights to something you shared publicly? Sure you can claim bragging rights, but once you put something out there and don't charge, it's a free-for-all. (No Pun Intended)

                    I Agree!