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Court terminates 8-year-old girl's marriage

Published:

Court terminates 8-year-old girl's marriage 

SANAA (Reuters) - A Yemeni court ordered the marriage of an eight-year-old girl terminated on Tuesday because she had not reached puberty.

The court also ordered the child's family to pay about $250 in compensation to the 30-year-old ex-husband.

The girl's lawyer and human rights activist Shatha Nasser said the minor had filed a suit in April asking for divorce and told the court that her husband had been physically abusing her and forcing her to have "sex with him after hitting her."

One of the people attending the trial volunteered to pay the compensation, the lawyer said, but did not explain the reason why the court ordered the compensation.

The ruling terminated the marriage instead of granting a divorce to prevent the husband from seeking to reinstate the marriage, according to the lawyer.

Many minor girls in Arab countries that observe tribal traditions are married to older husbands but not before puberty. Such marriages are also driven by poverty in countries like Yemen, one of the poorest countries outside Africa.

Entry #573

Comments

1.
spy153Comment by spy153 - April 18, 2008, 12:48 pm
God I'm glad to be American!
2.
justxploringComment by justxploring - April 18, 2008, 1:47 pm
This might be going on right here in the United States, but they're having a very hard time proving it.   This little 8 year old girl was very brave to come forward.
3.
time*treatComment by time*treat - April 18, 2008, 4:03 pm
You'd think they would have figured out that if they didn't have 6 or 7 kids apiece, they would have less "poverty" and less pressure to marry their children off.
4.
justxploringComment by justxploring - April 18, 2008, 5:29 pm
time*treat, in some countries and in some religions, women are considered to be commodities or property, so I doubt if they'd look at it that way. I've seen documentaries where healthy children are crippled so when they beg they'll take in more money.
5.
time*treatComment by time*treat - April 18, 2008, 8:02 pm
Well, yes, it's clear that some people would rather beg or steal than work. My thought is that healthy children, able to work, would bring in more money than crippled children begging for alms. What do you get when the entire society tries to live on charity? If my 'religion' had kept my family in poverty generation after generation, I'd be looking for a new "God".
6.
konaneComment by konane - April 18, 2008, 8:13 pm
Time*treat I agree with you but believe I've read that if you leave certain religions you write your own death sentence ... the killing is justified by those beliefs.
7.
Comment by pacattack05 - April 19, 2008, 12:41 am
Got God?

God.....Priceless!

Whassuuuuuppp?...God?

That's not a Gecko, a Geico, or a caveman...That's God.

American Idol.


8.
TenajComment by Tenaj - April 19, 2008, 11:24 am
I don't think people chose to beg or steal or want to abuse their children. Nobody wants to be a failure or harm others unless they have a mental problem which can be programmed through a religion or societal rules to a normal brain.

I grew up in a family of 15. I have 12 other siblings and even though I've not a thief now, I stole food many times as a child from being hungry and will miss my chair in dizziness oftentimes in school from being hungry.

If it hadn't been for the kindness and generosity of other people I wouldn't have shoes and clothes to wear to school.

But when I turned 14 and was able to get a work permit, I worked to helped my situation and is a well adjusted successful adult as well as my children. It wasn't my fault, I was born into that poverty and I certainly didn't chose my parents. But I had a choice of what ideas and religion I wanted. These children can't do that, but they grow into adults and the chain is not broken. They don't live in America.   

So it's not that those people are careless in the number of children that they have or they should practice birth control, it's the society that they live in. The abusiveness of woman and children is a way of life for them and have been for centuries.   And when it goes on from generation to generation , it never ends.

So in spite of whether birth control should have been used or the misconception that the people are chose to be like that, it's not. They are born into it. The children are the concern here. They didn't ask to be born into that society and there's not much they can do to help themselves.

That's where people like us come in after we take care of our own children and the children in our own country first. (Remember the Preamble - promote the general welfare and please don't come back with how people abuse it - that's our government's fault)

We don't have to give money or anything to try to help the children if we don't want to, but being educated adults we can at least show some type of intelligence in understanding the society that they live in and what it creates and see the big picture. Same with our own country. How does the beliefs and ideas, and government of our own country affect the people.

And as far as God. The principles of the God I know is good and create good people and societies.
9.
justxploringComment by justxploring - April 19, 2008, 4:04 pm
Thank you for that post, Tenaj. When I answered you, time*treat, I was referring to Yeman (since that's what this article is about) and other countries. Sounds as if many people here live in their own bubble and have no idea what it's like to be trapped in a world of poverty. There are people living all over the world in makeshift shelters with dirt floors.
10.
time*treatComment by time*treat - April 19, 2008, 7:56 pm
Fine jxp. Enlighten *this* bubble dweller as to how someone (or their tribe) could think that if they struggle to feed *one* child, that having 3, 4, or 5 more will alleviate their poverty. If you had gone to bed hungry as a child, it seems to me that somewhere along the line you'd say "I'm going to make sure my kids don't go through this."
11.
jarasanComment by jarasan - April 19, 2008, 8:42 pm
It appears that something similar is going on in the great state of Texas. Some people are using religion to rationalize and promote this type of abnormal sick behavior. It is a shame God doesn't punish in real time.

At least in Texas the Feds weren't involved and they didn't burn down any buildings and kill dozens of people like the Feds did in Waco.
12.
justxploringComment by justxploring - April 20, 2008, 2:57 am
time*treat, I'm sure Angel didn't post this to start a debate, so I'll try to keep this brief. In no way am I trying to enlighten you. I don't have the rest of my life to post here. This article is talking about Yeman where girls who reach puberty can be sold for $250. Do you think that birth control is readily available to women? Sorry, Mrs. Reagan, but sometimes it's not as easy as just saying "no."

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