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13 State Employees to Share $224 Million Powerball Lottery Jackpot

Topic closed. 48 replies. Last post 11 years ago by KY Floyd.

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Indiana
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December 29, 2005
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Posted: April 18, 2006, 9:17 am - IP Logged

Hi Floyd,

Thanks for the input.  It seems our thinking is similar on this matter.  I would very much like to hear what Todd has to say on this subject. 

Other than that just a few comments:

I never watched Happy Days but DAMN...I must lead a culturly deprived life because I never heard the phrase jump the shark before.   From reading the wikipedia info I gather that Todd meant people were wondering if Powerball had strayed from it's original intent which was to raise as much money for the states as possible.  But he can comment as to whether my understanding is correct.

(Interesting metaphor because the article also talks about something losing it's credibility.  One might infer that Powerball had some winners and because of that lost it's credibility in "the industry."  That's a novel concept!  But I'll wait for Todd's explanation in case I misunderstood.) 

With regard to whether Powerball officials understand the probability their game is based on...I think they understand it all too well.  Which leads to your second remark about them having to accept the samller jackpots.  They do have a choice in accepting them and they don't accept them.  That's why they tried to fix the game so that nobody will ever win a smaller jackpot.  They want the jckpot to roll over constantly.  Put another way...they want the regular players to play so they can fund their minimum jackpots but they don't (under any circumstances) want them to win and they'll take whatever steps necessary to insure that they don't win.

And that leads us to your third remark about their interest in what gets paid out being strictly a function of what comes in.  At the lower levels...aside from a few nitwits like me...they don't take in a lot of money.  So they fixed it so they don't have to pay out a lot of money.  And therein lies my problem with what they did.  It amounts to a policy of:

Get them to buy tickets but make sure they don't win anything.

Which IMHO is tantamount to rigging the game.

With regard to Powerplay...my thinking is this...the odds of winning the jackpot are over 1 in 145 million.  The odds of winning second prize are about 1 in 3.5 million...significantly better.  I don't think that buying 2 tickets significantly improves your chances of winnning the jackpot.  But given the better odds of winning a second place prize...buying Powerplay does improve your chances of winning a significant amount of money on the second place prize and of winning more money overall.  (Of course it also improves your chances of losing more money.)  It's still a long shot but it seems to make sense.  Or rather it seemed to make sense.

I'll reserve further comment until I hear from Todd. 

Jim 


Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

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    Urbandale, IA
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    November 11, 2004
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    Posted: April 19, 2006, 10:15 pm - IP Logged

    There are lots of unresolved anger issues here against the lottery.  Maybe someone was abused by the lottery as a child?

     Actually, two or three jackpot hits a year can make a tremendous different in revenue.  Also important - even more so - is how the jackpots occured (lots of little ones or a couple of big ones?).  Last year Powerball slipped under $2 billion in sales.  This year, after the change, they will approach $3 billion in sales.  People vote with their dollars.  One can argue that those who lead the lotteries are maroons, but a 30% bump in sales ain't bad.

    Whether the changes were "good" for the player will always be subjective, but the changes were not just about the jackpot odds.  Other prize tiers were doubled, the overall odds were kept the same, an occasional 10X PowerPlay was added, and there were two money-sharing Match 5 BONUS prizes paid out. 

    The PowerPlay idea is also a personal choice, but it does give the players a chance to redesign the prize structure of the game.  Not many lotteries do that.  If you want to move more money to the lower prizes, you can.  The prize pool for the extra buck all goes to the low-tier prizes. 

    Lotteries can only offer two prize options - cash and annuity.  These choices are at the opposite ends of the spectrum; take the money now, pay half in taxes and invest it until you lose it all or go for the long haul with a graduated income that will keep you even with inflation and is fully guaranteed so you can "fooorget about it."  And what is the point of being rich if you have to worry about investments all the time.  Nearly everyone takes the cash when nearly everyone should take the annuity.  Someday, maybe, the IRS will allow the lotteries to offer the best choice and let the winner decide exactly how to set up payments (some part in cash some part in some kind of annuity).

    You have to face the fact that the lotteries have a calling - they exisit to raise revenue and they will develop and offer games that raise the most revenue.  Like any business, a lottery cares about developing buying customers.  Selling a game that the angry folks online here are happy with, but that doesn't sell tickets, does no one any good. 

     

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      Indiana
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      Posted: April 20, 2006, 1:01 am - IP Logged

      And maybe someone got their bonus check from MUSL today.

      Jim


       


      Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

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        Urbandale, IA
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        Posted: April 20, 2006, 9:38 am - IP Logged

        Ha!  No extra money coming my way.  It just strikes me as odd that many people hold lotteries to a different standard.  I guess it is because they are owned by the states and we are all owners of the state.  But kind of like yellling "I pay your salary" at the police officer who writes you a ticket.

        I see comments like "If they were not the lottery, the AG would be on them for fraud (or whatever)."  What?  I just saw a Best Buy TV add selling a 42" inch plasma screen that is "sure to keep your family happy."  Lotteries have be run wide open and have tough limits on what they can and cannot say.  Only those crazy drug ads come close ["LIVE A HAPPY LIFE WITH MAGIPAN . . . maycauserepeateddeathsblahblahblah"]

        Lotteries are as open as can be.  If someone suggests that a lottery is hiding the odds, you just have to ask "How do you know the odds?" and the answer is that they saw it on the back of the ticket or on the brochure, etc. 

        Just some thoughts.  I don't want to dam things up here.

         


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          Posted: April 20, 2006, 2:03 pm - IP Logged

          There are lots of unresolved anger issues here against the lottery.  Maybe someone was abused by the lottery as a child?

           Actually, two or three jackpot hits a year can make a tremendous different in revenue.  Also important - even more so - is how the jackpots occured (lots of little ones or a couple of big ones?).  Last year Powerball slipped under $2 billion in sales.  This year, after the change, they will approach $3 billion in sales.  People vote with their dollars.  One can argue that those who lead the lotteries are maroons, but a 30% bump in sales ain't bad.

          Whether the changes were "good" for the player will always be subjective, but the changes were not just about the jackpot odds.  Other prize tiers were doubled, the overall odds were kept the same, an occasional 10X PowerPlay was added, and there were two money-sharing Match 5 BONUS prizes paid out. 

          The PowerPlay idea is also a personal choice, but it does give the players a chance to redesign the prize structure of the game.  Not many lotteries do that.  If you want to move more money to the lower prizes, you can.  The prize pool for the extra buck all goes to the low-tier prizes. 

          Lotteries can only offer two prize options - cash and annuity.  These choices are at the opposite ends of the spectrum; take the money now, pay half in taxes and invest it until you lose it all or go for the long haul with a graduated income that will keep you even with inflation and is fully guaranteed so you can "fooorget about it."  And what is the point of being rich if you have to worry about investments all the time.  Nearly everyone takes the cash when nearly everyone should take the annuity.  Someday, maybe, the IRS will allow the lotteries to offer the best choice and let the winner decide exactly how to set up payments (some part in cash some part in some kind of annuity).

          You have to face the fact that the lotteries have a calling - they exisit to raise revenue and they will develop and offer games that raise the most revenue.  Like any business, a lottery cares about developing buying customers.  Selling a game that the angry folks online here are happy with, but that doesn't sell tickets, does no one any good. 

           

          chuck:

          I will NEVER take annuity. There's no guarantee I will live long enough to collect in full.

           

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            Urbandale, IA
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            Posted: April 20, 2006, 2:34 pm - IP Logged

            You can still die before spending the cash.  You must be planning one great day after leaving the lottery office.  Party

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              Indiana
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              Posted: April 21, 2006, 10:03 am - IP Logged

              OK Chuck...so you're not high enough up the MUSL foodchain to get a bonus.  Bummer!  You deserve one.

              Just a couple of points:

              I don't want to hold the lottery to a different standard.  I want to hold them to the same standard any other business is held to.  Most notably truth in advertising.

              The bottom line with me is this...It's clear Powerball doesn't want winners at the lower level.  They want to advertise a great minimum prize but they also want to make sure nobody wins it.  As the kids say today...That's just wrong.

              And to dovetail that point with your point about developing new customers...I believe that Powerball has a duty and an obligation to the old customers...those of us who play regularly and fund their minimum jackpots.  If we stop buying tickets at the lower levels and wait for the jackpot to grow they won't be able to gurantee a minimum jackpot.

              As for the odds remaining the same...once again..that's just wrong.  When they added new mumbers to the matrix all the odds changed...even for those prizes at the lower levels.

              As for the guranteed increases for inflation...that's just nonsense.  Powerball did not take the gross value of the annuity and then divide by the total number of years and then increase by 4% for inflation.  Instead they reduced the amount a winner should get and then added for inflation.

              If you went to your boss at MUSL and asked for an increase in your salary to cover the rate of inflation and he said:

              OK Chuck...we can do that.  You make $100,000 a year.  We'll now pay you 40,000 a year and gurantee you a 4% increase every year and that way you can keep pace with inflation.

              The bottom line is you'd be livid.

              I could say more but what's the point.  I might feel differently when I hear a Powerball radio commercial that says at the end:

              Oddsofwinningthejackpotare1:146,107,962.EstimatedAdvertisedJackpotisanuuityvaluepaidover30years.Anuityisbackloadedandnotpaidinequalinstallemnts.Cashvalueisapproximately47%oftheadvertisedannuityvalue. 

              Jim


              Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

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                Indiana
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                Posted: April 21, 2006, 10:07 am - IP Logged

                Oops..I forgot:

                Winingssubjecttoallapplicablestatelocalandfederaltaxes.Thenamesandpicturesofallwinnerswillbereleasedtothepressatthetimetheycollecttheirprize.Prizemoneytakes10daysto6weekstocollect.Winnersareadvisedtomoveandchangetheirphonenumberbeforecollectingtheirprize.

                Jim 


                Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

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                  Chief Bottle Washer
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                  Posted: April 21, 2006, 10:12 am - IP Logged

                  Jim:  I think Chuck is high enough on the ladder to get whatever bonus exists.  And he knows what he's talking about.  (He better, or we're all in trouble!)

                   

                  Check the State Lottery Report Card
                  What grade did your lottery earn?

                   

                  Sign the Petition for True Lottery Drawings
                  Help eliminate computerized drawings!

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                    Chief Bottle Washer
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                    Posted: April 21, 2006, 10:14 am - IP Logged

                    Ha!  No extra money coming my way.  It just strikes me as odd that many people hold lotteries to a different standard.  I guess it is because they are owned by the states and we are all owners of the state.  But kind of like yellling "I pay your salary" at the police officer who writes you a ticket.

                    I see comments like "If they were not the lottery, the AG would be on them for fraud (or whatever)."  What?  I just saw a Best Buy TV add selling a 42" inch plasma screen that is "sure to keep your family happy."  Lotteries have be run wide open and have tough limits on what they can and cannot say.  Only those crazy drug ads come close ["LIVE A HAPPY LIFE WITH MAGIPAN . . . maycauserepeateddeathsblahblahblah"]

                    Lotteries are as open as can be.  If someone suggests that a lottery is hiding the odds, you just have to ask "How do you know the odds?" and the answer is that they saw it on the back of the ticket or on the brochure, etc. 

                    Just some thoughts.  I don't want to dam things up here.

                     

                    Chuck, you go on damming things up here.  We all appreciate your input.

                     

                    Check the State Lottery Report Card
                    What grade did your lottery earn?

                     

                    Sign the Petition for True Lottery Drawings
                    Help eliminate computerized drawings!

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                      Indiana
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                      Posted: April 21, 2006, 10:31 am - IP Logged

                      Damn!  I assumed I was talking to a MUSL employee but I didn't know I was talking to THE MAN!

                      Oops! 

                      Jim 

                      PS We do appreciate your input Chuck.  Even if we strongly disagree with the actions taken we want to hear your point of view. 


                      Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

                        Todd's avatar - Cylon 2.gif
                        Chief Bottle Washer
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                        Posted: April 21, 2006, 11:23 am - IP Logged

                        Jim:  "We" don't disagree with actions taken, "you" do.  I'm not convinced that Powerball's increasing annuity is necessarily a bad thing, as many people have voiced.  And as I've said before, an increase in number of jackpots was an actual phenomina, not just a perceived one, and the states felt they had to do something in order to protect their #1 most important game.

                         

                        Check the State Lottery Report Card
                        What grade did your lottery earn?

                         

                        Sign the Petition for True Lottery Drawings
                        Help eliminate computerized drawings!

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                          Urbandale, IA
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                          Posted: April 21, 2006, 2:42 pm - IP Logged

                          OK Chuck...so you're not high enough up the MUSL foodchain to get a bonus.  Bummer!  You deserve one.

                          Just a couple of points:

                          I don't want to hold the lottery to a different standard.  I want to hold them to the same standard any other business is held to.  Most notably truth in advertising.

                          The bottom line with me is this...It's clear Powerball doesn't want winners at the lower level.  They want to advertise a great minimum prize but they also want to make sure nobody wins it.  As the kids say today...That's just wrong.

                          And to dovetail that point with your point about developing new customers...I believe that Powerball has a duty and an obligation to the old customers...those of us who play regularly and fund their minimum jackpots.  If we stop buying tickets at the lower levels and wait for the jackpot to grow they won't be able to gurantee a minimum jackpot.

                          As for the odds remaining the same...once again..that's just wrong.  When they added new mumbers to the matrix all the odds changed...even for those prizes at the lower levels.

                          As for the guranteed increases for inflation...that's just nonsense.  Powerball did not take the gross value of the annuity and then divide by the total number of years and then increase by 4% for inflation.  Instead they reduced the amount a winner should get and then added for inflation.

                          If you went to your boss at MUSL and asked for an increase in your salary to cover the rate of inflation and he said:

                          OK Chuck...we can do that.  You make $100,000 a year.  We'll now pay you 40,000 a year and gurantee you a 4% increase every year and that way you can keep pace with inflation.

                          The bottom line is you'd be livid.

                          I could say more but what's the point.  I might feel differently when I hear a Powerball radio commercial that says at the end:

                          Oddsofwinningthejackpotare1:146,107,962.EstimatedAdvertisedJackpotisanuuityvaluepaidover30years.Anuityisbackloadedandnotpaidinequalinstallemnts.Cashvalueisapproximately47%oftheadvertisedannuityvalue. 

                          Jim

                          Oh, where to start.

                           1.  Truth in Advertising?  I can't imagine there is any other business that offers more truth in advertising than a lottery.  We all become numb to ads in general but sit down and watch some TV ads.  A lottery doesn't get special exemptions from truth in advertising laws; in fact, lotteries often have even stricter advertising laws and rules to follow.  Most lotteries just barely pass through legislatures and only when a lot of restrictions get tacked on - like WI's law that does not allow any advertising that might enourage someone to play.

                          2. Powerball doesn't want winners at the lower level?  Powerball is two games in one - a big jackpot game and a cash 5 game (with a $200,000 prize and up to $1 million with PowerPlay) but even a big jackpot game has have to have winners at the lower level to keep people interested in the game.  Our first multi-state game had overall odds of 1 in 750.  That was a game with very few lower winners and it had to be put down after a year.  Players like chasing the big jackpots but having to buy 750 tickets (on average) before any kind of win was just too little going on in the game.  Since then, our game designs have been bar-belled, with most of the prize money going to the jackpot and to the lowest prizes. 

                          In just re-reading your question, I may have misunderstood this one.  Perhaps you mean a the lower Jackpot level.  It is certainly true that a lot of hits at low jackpots would kill the game, but the big culprit is that when you design a big jackpot game (higher coverage needed for a hit), you are going to get less hits at the lowest end.  Powerball might sell 12 million tickets for a starting jackopt and 200 million tickets for a record jackpot.  The lower coverage at the low end means less chance of a hit (though it does happen).  If a lottery could control when the hits occur, it would probably be a mix of low hits (to keep player interest high and to help reduce jackopt fatigue) and really big hits (for the sales).  Game design limitations just do not allow you to have large jackpots AND lots of hits at the starting jackpot levels - at least not one that I can figure out yet.  The closest that anyone can come to such a design is the two-drum concept.  The cash 5 part of Powerball does get hit a lot and pays out lots of cash at that level.  If a player wants a game with frequesntly hit smaller jackpots, those kinds of games exist.  Powerball is not that kind of game.  You just can't have both in one. 

                          3.  Duty to old customers?  Of course lotteries care about old customers.  That is the player base for the game and saying that we want to encourage new customers is NOT to say that a lottery would want to trash old customers.  A lottery always has to work for both.  A lottery doesn't want to just keep going back to your core player for more and more money.  The ultimate key to success is to keep the core and to reach out to new customes.

                           4. Odds remaining the same is just wrong?  A change to the game does mean that the odds won't be EXACTLY the same, but the overall odds of winning a cash prize in the old game was 1 in 36.064.  In the new game, the overall odds are 1 in 36.06.  I call that pretty close to the same (a difference of six one-hundreths? tho my math has never been very good).  The odds of hitting the $3 prize in the old game was 1 in 70.38.  In the new game the $3 odds are 1 in 68.96.  Winning a $3 prize in the new game is not the same; it is even easier than before. 

                          5. Guaranteed increase for inflaction is nonsense?  If you take a bunch of cash to a reputable financial advisor and want to set up an income stream for life or some long period of time, you will get a graduated annuity.  It is not nonsense, it is the only reasonable way to go and to do otherwise would be irresponsible.  Lotteries that pay out equal payments are really not giving the annuity winner what they want - a life free of investment worries.  A prize of say $1 million a year sounds great now, but in five years that $1 million is starting to cramp your stye.  In 15 years, you might be looking for part-time work to try to trade for a new yacht (with its price that keeps going up every year).  Your description of the graduated annuity is correct, but I guess I don't understand how else you would do it. No one can do it as you suggest.  If you take cash to an adviser and ask them to figure out equal payments and then ask them to increase each payment by 4% a year, you will get an odd glance.  The money has to come from somewhere.  In that case, as in Powerball, the money comes from moving some of the money from the early years back to the later years to get a start on earning more interest.  The extra interest that is earned from investing some of the money longer is what makes the Powerball annuity amount bigger when compared to the cash amount. The difference is the interest earnings from investing some of the money longer.

                          The very best option would be if a winner could come in and design their own annuity stream - setting up how much they want to be paid immediately in cash and how much to set as an annuity over their preferred period.  Unfortunately, a lottery can only give the player two choices and so they are at the opposite ends of the spectrum - a cash lump sum or a long-term graduated annuity.  It will take a change in IRS rules to allow more.

                          6. Go ahead and feel differently.  Even better than radio, the information you state is printed on the back of the tickets, in the brochures, in the official published rules, and on the lottery web sites. 

                           

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                            Indiana
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                            Posted: April 22, 2006, 1:22 am - IP Logged

                            @Todd:

                            My appologies to you and all other Lottery Post members for my very poor choice of the the word "we."  That was a major gaff on my part as it clearly implied I was speaking for other people including the staff at Lottery Post...which I am not.  I am speaking strictly for myself.  I absolutely believe that there are other members here who share my point of view.  (But perhaps not because no one else has joined in this opportunity to speak directly to one of the "Powers that be.")  Regardless, it was arrogant on my part to use the word "we" and imply that I was speaking for them and/or others.  

                            Once again my appologies to all.

                            @Chuck:

                            Thank you for taking the time to give such a thoughtful response.  I appreciate it very much.  I would like to respond to a couple of the points you made.

                            1. With regard to the odds...perhaps I misunderstood your statement;  "Other prize tiers were doubled, the overall odds were kept the same."  I took that remark to mean that while prizes were doubled the odds were kept the same.  In the case of the second place prize it went from $100,000 with odds of approximately 1:3 million to $200,000 with odds of approximately 1:3.5 million.  That's a fairly significant increase.  The odds of winning anything without the Powerball also increased due to the matrix change...although I will concede the odds of just getting just the Powerball remained the same.

                            2. With regard to my remarks about Powerball not wanting winners at lower levels...your re-reading of my statement is correct.  I was referring to Powerball not wanting jackpot winners at the lower levels.  I must say that it sounds to me like you concede that point when you say; "...a lot of hits at low levels would kill the game..."  Obviously you don't want the game to be killed so it is logical to infer that you don't want the jackpot hit at lower levels.  Hence my point about the matrix being changed so that it is much harder to win the jackpot at the lower level and the players getting a (for lack of a better phrase) a raw deal.  

                            Given that I play for every draw (or at least almost every draw...I missed 2 last year) I may be in the minority of players...but I have to be absolutely honest with you and say that when I play I hope to win and would be thrilled to win a jackpot at any level.  And I think that point holds true for everyone who buys a Powerball ticket when the jackpot is at the minimum or lower levels.  So in essence it seems to me that I want to buy a ticket and I hope to win...while you want me to buy a ticket and you hope I don't win.

                            3. With regard to your point about keeping the base.  I work for a retailer that sells lottery tickets.  While the customers I see are admittedly a very minute sample of your customer base I can assure you that there are many people who used to play Powerball who no will longer play.  And it isn't because they haven't won the jackpot.  Over and over again I hear disgruntled players say they don't play anymore because they never win anything.  Not that they don't win the jackpot..but that they don't win anything.

                            As an aside let me tell you my own experience this year.  As I said I have played for every draw this year.  I have bought a minimum of 5 lines with Powerplay for a total of $10 per draw.  (And yes when the jackpot was higher I bought a few more.  The most I spent was 15 lines with Powerplay for a total of $30 on one draw.)  Wednesday's draw produced my second win of the year.  I got 2 numbers plus the Powerball ($7) for a total of $28.  (In all the years I've played Powerball $28 is the most I've ever won.)  My only other win this year was 1 number plus the Powerball ($4) with a 5X's multiplier for a total of $20.

                            Powerball's paybacks are the lower levels are terrible.  And simply put it is no fun to play when you lose and lose consistantly.  Not winning anything...alienates base players.  Conversely, my experience at work shows that people who win smaller amounts as prizes almost always roll them over for the next draw.

                            4. With regard to the information about the game being printed...let me say this...I just looked at the Powerball ticket I purchased from the Hoosier Lottery today and there is no prize information (along the lines of what we were discussing) or add information printed on the back of my ticket.  It is printed on the playsip.  But I feel compelled to remind you that your own website says that 70% to 80% of the tickets purchased are quickpicks.  Given this it is clear that 70% to 80% of the people who play Powerball never see the information we are discussing.  Furthermore, not everyone is connected to the internet and can visit a lottery website. 

                            Yes the information is out there for those who want to find it and take the time to look for it.  But the fact remains the public is woefully ignorant of the odds and the game structure.  Many players I speak to don't know there is now a 30 year annuity or that the structure of the annuity (for better or for worse) has been changed.  Many players don't know that there is actually a cash value that is less than the advertised value.  Worse than that some players think the cash value is after taxes.  Even worse that that some players actually think that the cash value is the amount you win after the lottery takes out the so-called "lottery tax". ..and then you pay income tax on what's left.

                            Granted this all may not entirely be Powerball's fault.  But it doesn't seem to me like Powerball and the affilated lotteries go out of their way to educate the players.  The flashing sign we have at work (from the Hoosier Lottery) only shows the advertised annuity value.  But it makes no mention of it as an annuity.  It simply says Powerball Jackpot.  There is no doubt in my mind that this is done intentionally so that the larger jackpot amount gets the attention of the players.   

                               
                            5. I understand what you are saying about the graduated annuity.  I don't like it but I don't think there is much point in discussing it further except to say...that IMHO...to advertise this as an increase for inflation is clearly misleading for all the reasons I stated in my previous post.

                            6. Finally...with regard to truth in advertising...you need look no further than your own website to see a graphic demonstration of what I'm referring to.  On the Powerball website is a picture of the most recent jackpot winners holding the big ceremoninal check for $220,200,000!     

                            Press reports and indeed the text of that article indicate that the winners have opted for the cash value of (a combined total of approximately) $102,000,00.  Once again the text clearly states they will receive about $8.5 million each but there is no mention of a $102 million dollar prize.  It's up the reader to do the math...assuming they get beyond the image of that $220,000,000 check.  And let's face it...we all know a picture is worth a thousand words. 

                            So let me ask you...why is Powerball advertising that these people won over $220 million dollars when the fact is they did not win and will not receive $220 million?  Even better why doesn't Powerball show them with a ceremonial $102,000,000 check?  Even better than that whay doesn't Powerball show each winner with a ceremonial $8.5 million check?

                            We all know the answer...BIG JACKPOTS GENERATE BIG SALES.  So even though these people di not win $220,000,000...every effort must be made to convince the public that they did.

                            If the general public saw a picture of a $102 million dollar check...instead of the advertised $220 million check might they start asking questions?  Would such a picture shatter what some people refer to as the Powerball illusion?  Would that be worse for the game than people winning little jackpots of $15...oops...$6.9 million dollars?

                            Chuck, I understand much of what you're saying.  But I don't like the changes to Powerball.  (And I'd be willing to bet if the general public was better informed they wouldn't like them either.)  But more than that I don't like what I perceive to be the spin that justifies those changes.  To be fair I'm sure it's not easy running a game like Powerball.  And to be fair to me please don't write off why I say as the ravings of a disgruntled loser.  I consider myself both a proponent and advocate of lotteries...even if I am a cynic and a critic of the same.

                            I hope the next time you make changes to the game you consider the perspective of the everyday, regular player who supports your game with is/her hard earned money and hopes beyond hope that they might...for just one time in their life...be very, very lucky.

                            Despite the harsh and confrontational tone of what I've written please be assured that I send you my warmest regards,

                            Jim 

                               


                            Money frees you from doing things you dislike.  Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy.  - Groucho Marx

                              Todd's avatar - Cylon 2.gif
                              Chief Bottle Washer
                              New Jersey
                              United States
                              Member #1
                              May 31, 2000
                              23261 Posts
                              Offline
                              Posted: April 22, 2006, 7:02 am - IP Logged

                              JIM:

                              Every lottery in the USA shows the winners holding a check with the annuity payout amount listed, not the cash value.  Why are you picking on Powerball?  If every lottery does it, then it is not a valid point to be used in your attempt to rip Powerball a new one.

                              You may not like that they do it, but it is certainly not "deceptive advertising".  You should be more judicious in your use of that term.  There are some real scam artists out there ripping people off, and to lump Powerball in with them, just because you don't like a big annuity payout check, is wrong and unfair.

                               

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