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Heartbreak: Lottery scam led to NJ grandmother's suicide

Topic closed. 24 replies. Last post 9 years ago by KY Floyd.

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csfb's avatar - Lottery-001.jpg

United States
Member #15309
May 13, 2005
307 Posts
Offline
Posted: November 14, 2007, 2:40 am - IP Logged

I'm so sorry for the woman.  She must have been so depressed after the stark realization she had lost her lifetime savings.

The elderly become feeble-minded as they get older.  That is why they are easy prey to the con artist. 

We should revere our elderly, instead of victimizing them.

I hope the people that did this to her will suffer for a very long long time and die violent deaths.  Bash

         Sun Smiley             

    mrichardson$'s avatar - Lottery-050.jpg
    georgetown ga
    United States
    Member #56206
    November 7, 2007
    137 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: November 14, 2007, 8:23 am - IP Logged

    Some people just don`t care what they do to other people. They only care about money !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      rsb2323's avatar - winter
      Detroit
      United States
      Member #4046
      March 16, 2004
      234 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: November 14, 2007, 10:19 am - IP Logged

      Here is a scam e-mail I received today.  This is why so many people fall for this crap.  These people should be shot!!!

       

      PLEASE HELP ME, FOR GOD SAKE‏
      From:COLLINS IKPOMWONSA (fauxpas@singnet.com.sg)
      Sent:Wed 11/14/07 8:24 AM
      Reply-to:williams_spencer04@hotmail.co.uk
      To: collinsikpomwonsa@hotmail.com

       

       

      Dear Sir/Madam,

      It is obvious that this mail will come to
      you as a surprise. This is Because we have
      not met before but I am

      sending you this email due to the
      circumstance surrounding the health of my
      dad, Mr. Christopher
      Ikpomwonsa.

      My name is Collins Ikpomwonsa, the eldest
      child to my dad, I am 15 years old, a native
      of Edo State,

      Nigeria. I know very well that, you are
      going to take this message as one of those
      junk messages. But

      believe me, it is real from the dept of my
      heart. I cannot claim my dad to be heal,
      when he is not.

      Like I earlier told you, my dad is very
      heal. He is suffering from cancerous ailment
      and stroke. Doctor

      said he can live with the stroke for the
      rest of his life, so long as he is able to
      maintain good diet and have

      a well regulated blood pressure. But the
      problem we are having now is that of the
      cancer. He has limited

      time to go about the operation. He has been
      referred to have the operation done in
      Germany, but no funds

      to start up with. Doctor's report has been
      acquired for the application of visa at the
      German embassy

      here in Nigeria. The problem now is, there
      is no funds to start up with. Not even a
      transportation fare

      that could be used from my State, Edo State
      to Lagos State, where the Embassy is
      located, not to talk

      about the ticket fee and the treatment
      expenses in Germany.

      My family is a very poor on we barely eat
      from hand to mouth. And there is no security
      for us to acquire

      a lone for this, and we have not been able
      invest in the NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE

      SCHEME(NHIS), because there is no money to
      do it with.

      So due to the above, I have decided to go
      into begging and soliciting for funds from
      people to help my

      poor family in this circumstance that has
      befallen us. Please, in the name of God, and
      for Humanity sake, I

      am pleading for help from you, it does not
      matter how small it is, it could make a
      dying life survive. I

      know God will with his abundant wealth will
      refill it for you in thousand folds.

      Immediately I am through with sending you
      this mail, I will go back to the street to
      continue begging from

      people over here.

      I am sorry if this is going to get you
      inconvenienced, please do not bother your
      good self. Because, I do

      not want you to please me, while displeasing
      your self. But, if you know you have enough
      to help my poor

      family with, please do help, and God will
      bless you.

      You can contact me with the below email
      address and phone number:
      Email: collinsikpomwonsa@yahoo.com
      Phone: +2347031154801


      Thank you so much for your response.

      Your Child,
      Collins Ikpomwonsa.
      I sent this fraud a n e-mail telling him I had money to send him.  I'm waiting on a response.
      Rant
        grengrad's avatar - nw rogue.jpg
        Raleigh
        United States
        Member #49057
        January 17, 2007
        172 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: November 14, 2007, 6:39 pm - IP Logged

        I know someone that has won two fairly large online contests.

        What happens when you really win is they call you.

        They say, "is this Mr. So and So?"

        When you say yes, they say, "Mr.  So and So, you have won $XX,XXX from the such and such contest"

        "We have your name and address as Such and Such is this correct?"

        When my friend replied, "So is this kind of scam where I have to send you money first?" They replied, "No Mr. So and So, a when you win a real contest you are never asked to pay any money of any kind." 

        "Mr. So and So, we are going to send you an affidavit to sign and notarize stating that you are who you say you are and live where you say you live Once we receive that affidavit back we will mail you a check for $XX,XXX."

        A day or two later you get an affidavit in the mail that asks you to confirm that you really are Mr. So and So and live at Such and Such Address. It only asks you to sign for this information. It does not ask you for your social security number, drivers license number, or any banking information. They do not ask for any fees of any kind, not even for the cost of them shipping you the affidavit.

        A few weeks after you mail in the affidavit you will receive a check.  

          justxploring's avatar - villiarna
          Wandering Aimlessly
          United States
          Member #25360
          November 5, 2005
          4461 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: November 15, 2007, 1:36 am - IP Logged

          I'm so sorry for the woman.  She must have been so depressed after the stark realization she had lost her lifetime savings.

          The elderly become feeble-minded as they get older.  That is why they are easy prey to the con artist. 

          We should revere our elderly, instead of victimizing them.

          I hope the people that did this to her will suffer for a very long long time and die violent deaths.  Bash

          I would agree with you, but she was only 72 years old! That isn't old by today's standards.  Except for those unfortunate individuals who are afflicted with dementia and Alzheimer's disease, the mind is usually the last thing to go.  Many great artists are creating brilliant works at 80.  As you probably know, Normal Mailer died last week at age 84.  He completed a novel last year.  A really silly show with Charlie Sheen called 2-1/2 Men has Robert Wagner (age 77) as an occasional guest.  He's still hot! (well, I think so)  Roger Moore (be still my heart!) who played James Bond until he was 58 is currently an Ambassador for UNICEF at 80 years old.  Former Pres Carter is 83 and visited Darfur last month to promote peace with Rev Desmond Tutu (he's only 76)   Henry Kissinger, born 1923, still advises our world leaders on international relationships.  Barbara Walters is 78.  At age 88 Mike Wallace decided it was time to retire from 60 Minutes.  (I agreed)  However, if 91 year old Walter Cronkite wants to come back to anchor the evening news again, I'll be watching.

          Well, I think I've made my point that most people do not become feeble-minded as they get older, just those who stop using their minds in the first place.

            csfb's avatar - Lottery-001.jpg

            United States
            Member #15309
            May 13, 2005
            307 Posts
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            Posted: November 15, 2007, 4:21 am - IP Logged

            I'm sure this woman was more alert at 62 than at 72.  Barbara Walters, et al, the same way.  It's the natural course of life.  Aging, it's called.  We will all get there in our own time and pace.

                     Sun Smiley             

              time*treat's avatar - radar

              United States
              Member #13130
              March 30, 2005
              2171 Posts
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              Posted: November 15, 2007, 9:47 am - IP Logged

              I would agree with you, but she was only 72 years old! That isn't old by today's standards.  Except for those unfortunate individuals who are afflicted with dementia and Alzheimer's disease, the mind is usually the last thing to go.  Many great artists are creating brilliant works at 80.  As you probably know, Normal Mailer died last week at age 84.  He completed a novel last year.  A really silly show with Charlie Sheen called 2-1/2 Men has Robert Wagner (age 77) as an occasional guest.  He's still hot! (well, I think so)  Roger Moore (be still my heart!) who played James Bond until he was 58 is currently an Ambassador for UNICEF at 80 years old.  Former Pres Carter is 83 and visited Darfur last month to promote peace with Rev Desmond Tutu (he's only 76)   Henry Kissinger, born 1923, still advises our world leaders on international relationships.  Barbara Walters is 78.  At age 88 Mike Wallace decided it was time to retire from 60 Minutes.  (I agreed)  However, if 91 year old Walter Cronkite wants to come back to anchor the evening news again, I'll be watching.

              Well, I think I've made my point that most people do not become feeble-minded as they get older, just those who stop using their minds in the first place.

              Some of those people, arguably, started out feeble-minded... although it does explain why some "world leaders" are making such clever(Not!) decisions these daysClown.

              Anyway, something about this story doesn't set right with me.  

              She's gonna get scammed out of a quarter mil, chasing only 2.5 mil?

              She's keeping these detailed records, and not telling any of the kids what's going on during the entire episode? 

              In neo-conned Amerika, bank robs you.
              Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms should be the name of a convenience store, not a govnoment agency.

                Avatar

                United States
                Member #10720
                January 23, 2005
                933 Posts
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                Posted: November 21, 2007, 8:48 pm - IP Logged

                Possible remedies: 

                A severe penalty for sending such a letter or e-mail. That is, the person who is told they "won" should immediately be able to sue for that amount, either the sender or the country of origin. At least make the penalties more severe than the penalty for illegally downloading music. If someone is targeted who is elderly or unable to understand the situation that should be even more severe! 

                Mail servers should be able to detect incoming mail mentioning winning Lottery prizes and someone at the ISP can intervene and then take immediate action against the sender.

                  KyMystikal's avatar - 1457224010054
                  Florence, Alabama
                  United States
                  Member #8658
                  November 13, 2004
                  1993 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: November 22, 2007, 12:13 am - IP Logged

                  Believe it or not, I have a really good friend that I work, and fish with that fell for a very similiar scam.

                  His wife was supposibly playing some internet lottery. (I'll get back to that one) they recieved (from Candada) a check in the mail for 5800 dollars, along with a letter stating that he had to pay 1800 dollars in processing fees. His first instinct was, its a scam. but his wife conviced him that it was probably from the website she had been visiting and that it was legitimate. He went to the bank and deposited the check. after three days, THE CHECK CLEARED. the money was deposited into his bank account.

                  home free....right?..not quite.

                  he withdrew the 1800 bucks, got a money order and sent the money to the given address in Canada!

                  He never said a word to me.

                  guess what happened next. 7 days later he goes to draw out 20 bucks so we could go fishing at his banks atm. his account had been frozen! he went inside the bank while I waited in the truck. he came out with the most horrid look upon his face. he told me the entire story.

                  The check for the Lottery was a Fraud. how it cleared the first time, I don't know. I do know this.

                  I told him, "you know I keep up with Lottery's. you should have come to me and ask for some advice!"

                  "you should have trusted your first instinct and not listened to your wife."

                  The only legal Lotteries in the US are the State/Multistate funded lotteries!

                  The Powerball and The Cash 5 are the only legal lotteries in NC right now.

                  all the others are operating illegally, or are a scam.

                  Personally, I would never play even an out of country lottery. There was an American that won the Spanish El Goro. when he went to the lottery office to collect, The Spanish bastards refused to pay him because he was not a Spanish Citizen!

                  No Legitimate Lottery will ever CONTACT YOU and INFORM you that you are a winner. they would rather see you not collect! it is your responsibility to identify yourself as a winner and claim your prize!

                  He should have gotten some advice,

                  They better never send me one of those scam Lottery winning Checks.

                  I WILL GO DIRECTLY TO THE POLICE STATION TO SET UP A STING OPERATION!!!

                  Moral of the story.

                  never get involved in any buisiness deal that you know nothing about, without consulting an unbiosed outside expert.

                  unless you were a stock annalyist, CPA, finacial planner, with a buisiness degree, you wouldn't invest your retirement into a company without first checking it out would you?....if you had never even purchaced your first home, you wouldn't buy into real estate without an apprasial, or at least a realitor advice? would you?

                  I could have saved my friend alot of money, had he have seeked my advice. and even if I didn't know what to tell him, (which I did) I have had enough experience with Lotteries that I could have directed him down the right path. 

                  needless to say I had to spot him the gas money to go fishing that day. what are friends for?.

                  I only wish I could have saved him the heartache of loosing 1800 dollars!

                  If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!

                  This reminds me of this scam several people tried to run on me on Postaroo.com. I was selling a riding lawn mower and someone answered the ad stating that they were from the US but out of the country on business. They wanted to know if it was ok to send a postal money order for the lawn mower for $2300 which I was selling for $350. I was told to cash the money order and a amount for shipping the lawnmower, which I have forgot exactly what it was but it was around $1,500,  was to be put on a  money order and sent to that shipper who would come pick up the lawn mower once they received my money order. The difference from the original sales price and the shipping was mine to keep for all my troubles. There were a lot of red flags that came up when I first read the email from that person but the keeping the difference at the end was the "nail in the coffin" for me on determining that it was a scam.  I know people get scammed into paying more for something than what it's worth but nobody gives away twice as much money for a item, atleast not volunteering on their own.

                  I love doubles and remember, it's just a game!!!!!!

                    Avatar
                    NY
                    United States
                    Member #23835
                    October 16, 2005
                    3474 Posts
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                    Posted: November 22, 2007, 12:38 am - IP Logged

                    Possible remedies: 

                    A severe penalty for sending such a letter or e-mail. That is, the person who is told they "won" should immediately be able to sue for that amount, either the sender or the country of origin. At least make the penalties more severe than the penalty for illegally downloading music. If someone is targeted who is elderly or unable to understand the situation that should be even more severe! 

                    Mail servers should be able to detect incoming mail mentioning winning Lottery prizes and someone at the ISP can intervene and then take immediate action against the sender.

                    There are already penaties for fraud. The problem is catching the people who are committing the fraud. Some of them are stupid, but it's not easy to catch the smarter ones. Smart people are often ahead of others in new endeavors and some of the smart criminals will always be ahead of the people trying to stop them. At the opposite end, there will always be people falling for the newest (and sometimes the very old) scams.

                    The technology to scan emails is readily available, but if you think that's the solution you probably haven't thought it through.  It would be wildly impractical to look at every email that mentions winning the lottery, so let's assume that only emails containing the full text of a known message are flagged. How many of them are going to be perfectly legitimate emails from people who think they need to forward it to everyone in their address book to warn them about it? What do you suppose your internet service would cost if your ISP had to have somebody read 1000 or 10,000 emails a day and decide what to do about them?

                    Perhaps the bigger problem is the door you'd be opening for people to read your email because they have your best interest in mind.  Do you reeally want the government, your ISP, or anyone else reading your email?