Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 4, 2016, 7:09 am
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Court: elderly sisters' gambling pact forces lottery jackpot split

PowerballPowerball: Court: elderly sisters' gambling pact forces lottery jackpot split

The Connecticut Appeals Court has ruled a 1995 pact struck by two widowed sisters to split each other's future gambling winnings is still binding despite the fact they no longer speak to one another.

The decision paves the way for a public family feud pitting Theresa Sokaitis, 81, against Rose Bakaysa, 85, over a $500,000 Powerball jackpot Bakaysa hit on June 18, 2005, but doesn't want to share with her estranged sibling.

Sokaitis is suing Bakaysa for breach of contract. Bakaysa's attorney, William Sweeney Jr., told the Herald in November Sokaitis is a "gold digger."

"We're going to go to trial court and battle it out," Sokaitis' Boston attorney, Sean Higgins, said. She was, he said, "extremely excited by the court's decision. She's obviously elated for the chance to prove that she is entitled to her share of the money."

Unlike Massachusetts, a bygone Connecticut law still frowns upon private wagering contracts. However, two appellate judges, in overruling Connecticut Superior Court Judge Patty Pittman's 2006 summary judgment awarding the money to Bakaysa, found the notarized agreement between the sisters was not induced by the guarantee of hard cash, "but rather their mutual promises to one another to share in any winnings they received."

Though Connecticut now widely embraces many forms of gambling, Appeals Court Judge William Lavery cast the lone dissenting vote against Sokaitis, stating in written remarks that "money" was the motivation behind the deal. "We must assume that it was the intent of the Legislature to continue to prohibit wagering contracts like the one at issue in this case," he said.

Boston Herald

We'd love to see your comments here!  Register for a FREE membership — it takes just a few moments — and you'll be able to post comments here and on any of our forums. If you're already a member, you can Log In to post a comment.

8 comments. Last comment 9 years ago by JackpotWanna.
Page 1 of 1
tntea's avatar - Lottery-059.jpg

United States
Member #5344
June 30, 2004
23641 Posts
Offline
Posted: February 5, 2008, 7:37 am - IP Logged

This is sad.. Two sisters having to go to court like this..

I don't have to have a notarized agreement to share my winnings with my siblings..

And if for some reason they didn't want  to share theirs with me  I would respect that...

Money can make people act childish.

     OLD/Vtrac   Lottery Bible         Double Warnings      Thumbs Up TN F34/F44

    chasingadream's avatar - Archangel 01.jpg

    United States
    Member #38687
    May 3, 2006
    315 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: February 5, 2008, 9:23 am - IP Logged

    This is sad.. Two sisters having to go to court like this..

    I don't have to have a notarized agreement to share my winnings with my siblings..

    And if for some reason they didn't want  to share theirs with me  I would respect that...

    Money can make people act childish.

    i agree

    Oogle  waiting patiently for my jackpot

      time*treat's avatar - radar

      United States
      Member #13130
      March 30, 2005
      2171 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: February 5, 2008, 9:35 am - IP Logged

      The sister that filed suit wouldn't have had a case, if the agreement had never been made or had been dissolved within that 10 years. Under most circumstances, contracts don't dissolve just because the people who signed them get mad at each other.

      In neo-conned Amerika, bank robs you.
      Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms should be the name of a convenience store, not a govnoment agency.

        LuckyLilly's avatar - savy chick.png

        United States
        Member #50124
        February 26, 2007
        601 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: February 5, 2008, 10:50 am - IP Logged

        Yikes, this kinda scared me cuz in the past I have promised to give money to people I'm now estranged from.  Then I got to the part about the notarized statement, and I definitely never did a notarized statement.  Hope that clears me.  LOL  Plus, I never promised if I "ever" won to share it.  It was for a specific prize.

        Glad I'm smarter now. 

          ThatScaryChick's avatar - x1MqPuM
          Idaho
          United States
          Member #56506
          November 21, 2007
          6537 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: February 5, 2008, 11:28 am - IP Logged

          The sister that filed suit wouldn't have had a case, if the agreement had never been made or had been dissolved within that 10 years. Under most circumstances, contracts don't dissolve just because the people who signed them get mad at each other.

          It's a bit strange. I wonder if the contract was for life. It was ten years between the contract signing and the year that one of the sisters won the jackpot. But how long have they been fighting? One year, two or all ten?

          "No one remembers the person who almost climbed the mountain, only the person who eventually gets to the top."

            rundown99's avatar - cigar

            United States
            Member #567
            August 14, 2002
            482 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: February 5, 2008, 1:23 pm - IP Logged

            This is why you should remain anonymous if you ever win a large lottery prize.

            Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

            If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!

              Avatar

              United States
              Member #972
              December 30, 2002
              465 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: February 6, 2008, 3:35 pm - IP Logged

              81 and 85? Those cranky old ladies. This is where the phrase "life's too short" might come into play. I would offer sis 20% if she would sign something voiding the agreement.

                JackpotWanna's avatar - squiz

                United States
                Member #4121
                March 23, 2004
                817 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: February 14, 2008, 4:36 pm - IP Logged

                Deeply saddened by this story.  Why not share with your only sister? At their age I would assume that they would be more mature and forgive each other.  With $500,000, come on.  Group hugs.

                 

                Group Hug