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Official gets 8 years at home for rigging lottery

Topic closed. 45 replies. Last post 9 years ago by MaddMike51.

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RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
mid-Ohio
United States
Member #9
March 24, 2001
19830 Posts
Offline
Posted: March 3, 2008, 12:50 pm - IP Logged

I agree with everyone here that the sentence was way too light, but it also raises a bigger question that no one seems to be asking; and that is HOW did he know where the winning ticket was going to be sold?  I thought no one was supposed to know that! ... Especially lottery officials!!!  I guess it stands to reason why so many winning tickets are in certain zip codes ...  I've noticed that for a while now in both NY and NJ.  Makes you say hmmm.  The other story about all the winners in a little NY store lends itself to the same issue.

While looking into a claim from a person who believed he had lost a winning jackpot ticket -- a lottery investigator requested and received a list of winning tickets which also included the information Foreman passed onto his two friends the crooks.
http://www.lotterypost.com/news/99980

 * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
   
             Evil Looking       

    Raven62's avatar - binary
    New Jersey
    United States
    Member #17843
    June 28, 2005
    49784 Posts
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    Posted: March 3, 2008, 1:07 pm - IP Logged

    "Foreman, a retired Indianapolis Police Department sergeant..."

    The guy is corrupt, so you have to wonder what misdeeds he was party too as a Police officer.

    A mind once stretched by a new idea never returns to its original dimensions!

      Instyle's avatar - Lottery-044.jpg

      United States
      Member #55821
      October 21, 2007
      161 Posts
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      Posted: March 3, 2008, 1:25 pm - IP Logged

      I noticed that in Georgia too. The fact that someone knows what roll as the winning ticket and where its going is unbelivable . I wrote the lottery commision.  But as usual the memo was ignored.  When a County the size of a small country can have as many as 10+ big win scratch off tickets, that's more than a coincidence.  And it happens a lot.   When any of you have a chance, go to a lottery site that post the winners and watch how many (I'm talking about scratch-offs) big winners there are in the same town. 

        Avatar
        Columbia City, Indiana
        United States
        Member #2978
        December 9, 2003
        381 Posts
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        Posted: March 3, 2008, 1:54 pm - IP Logged

           Mr. Foreman's attorney was former Hoosier Lottery Director Jack Crawford.

           Before we get off on the wrong track here, I should emphasize that our lottery had balls when Mr. Crawford was in charge (you can read that however you'd like), and the Hoosier Lottery was making all kinds of money before he left his post. He was the best lottery director we've ever had, and without a doubt the most honest man who has ever held that post.

           I spoke with Mr. Crawford when the newspapers reported that he was challenging the constitutionality of the disclosure law under which Foreman was charged. You must understand that Indiana has TWO disclosure laws - one for Hoosier Lottery employees and officials and another for all other state employees. The "Disclosing Confidential Lottery Information" law is the one that keeps the Hoosier Lottery in business, and it guarantees that no one who has ever worked there can give evidence against anyone else who was or is currently employed there, including the Director. If you work for the Hoosier Lottery and you talk to the police or to the FBI about the crimes being committed by your superiors or colleagues, you'll face fifty years in prison and, given the way this law is written and phrased, your acquittal is highly unlikely.

           Now, pay attention, because this is going to get complicated.

           This case came about because Mr. Foreman had read a fax when everyone else involved, including the intended recipient, was out to lunch. I can only conclude that the fax originated at Scientific Games offices at the Indianapolis Airport, although I have no proof of this. Foreman, being alone in the office at the time, picked up the fax and read it. The fax contained very specific information concerning the location of a top prize-winning scratch-off ticket, and even included the batch number on the pack (the Hoosier Lottery doesn't have access to these batch numbers; they're used to help verify winning tickets, and are only provided by SciGames when a winner is claimed).

           Foreman put the fax back in the tray. Later that day, he ran into someone he knew (either Foltz or Adkins, I can't remember which) and told him, "If you want a good chance at a winner, go play the twenty dollar scratch-offs in Crown Point." End quote. Notice, please, that he did not identify the name of the store, nor did he identify the game (we actually had three $20 games at that time).

           Foltz and Adkins then drove to Crown Point. They stopped at a little Mom & Pop store there and bought every $20 scratch-off in the place, spending between seven and eight hundred dollars and, sure enough, they found a ticket worth a million dollars. The next day, one of the men went to Hoosier Lottery headquarters and claimed $25,000, which was half of the first installment. Hoosier Lottery Director Jack Ross paid the claim personally, but told him that his friend would have to come in to claim his share in person. 

           When the other guy showed up the next day to claim his $25k, he was recognized as an acquaintance of Foreman by William Holcraft, a Hoosier Lottery Internal Security Investigator. He went to the Indiana State Police and launched an investigation, and the next thing you know, reporters began to call Hoosier Lottery officials, asking some embarrassing questions. Holcraft was immediately "fired," but not before signing another "Confidential Agreement" saying that, in consideration of a $7,500 payoff, Holcraft will call the Hoosier Lottery Director and give him a heads-up if Holcraft is questioned about this matter by the police or by the FBI, either now or at any time in the future. Another condition the agreement stipulates is that Holcraft will have to pay back almost ten times that amount if he discloses or discusses any aspect of the case, or of the deal he accepted from the Hoosier Lottery, and that he agrees to plead guilty to any subsequent disclosure charges, whether he hires an attorney or not. I can speak with confidence about this agreement because I have a hard copy of it, thanks to an investigative reporter who sent it to LosingJeff and me. 

           When Mr. Crawford announced that he was going to challenge the constitutionality of the Hoosier Lottery Disclosure law, I thought that would be the last anyone ever heard of this case. I believed that it would be tied up in court until Foreman died, and then it would just fade away as so many issues do in this state. This plea bargain serves the same purpose; it guarantees that no evidence illustrating the crooked practices of this lottery will ever reach a courtroom.

           Had Mr. Crawford been successful, the Hoosier Lottery would have fallen, and many, many public officials would have gone to jail.

           As it stands, and knowing what I know about this case, I believe that fax was actually intended for Mr. Holcraft. There is a possibility that it was meant for Chief of Security Pete Byrne, who was also lightly implicated, but to go into that would mean much more typing on my part, and more reading on yours, and it eventually leads back to Holcraft, anyway. Most likely, though, it was Holcraft's fax but, since he had prematurely involved the state police (another infamously corrupt, state-sanctioned organization), they had to get rid of him as quietly as possible. I firmly believe that if the constitutional issue had gone to federal court, as it should have, Mr. Holcraft would not have made it to the courthouse alive; Hoosier Lottery officials would not have been able to defend themselves against his testimony, and I'm certain that a few elected state officials would have been implicated as well.

           That's not the whole story, of course, but you now have something more substantive than what's in the article. If you want or need more, just read my posts about the Hoosier Lottery (if you do a search, I'm sure you'll find three or four comments on the subject).

           I know now exactly what I'll do if I ever win a significant jackpot. I actually fantasize about saying this at the press conference when they ask me what I'm going to do with the money. "I'm going to do what any self-respecting millionaire does in this state. Since ours are the cheapest in the nation, I'm going to buy some Indiana politicians and judges."

           I'll never get to say that, though. If I ever do win a jackpot of $50M or more, I won't attend a press conference; I'll set up a trust and claim my millions anonymously. I'll still make the payoffs to the crooks in public office, I just won't advertise it. If you want to win the game, you have to play by the same rules the other players follow.

        Come, Pinky; we must prepare for tomorrow night...

        Jim

          lottocalgal's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
          CA
          United States
          Member #57222
          December 23, 2007
          587 Posts
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          Posted: March 3, 2008, 3:48 pm - IP Logged

          I hear ya... something's just don't seem right ... and it's called 'inside information'. I'm sure there's alot of corruption going on .. most of it never makes it to the public. But I'm sure it's happening everyday.

          That's what I was wondering.  Does that mean the lottery knows EXACTLY what stores get what tickets.  I know that everything is coded, but I assusmed that they  just  grabbed a box of tickets and shipped them to the retailers as ordered.  I don't like knowing that it is possible that they can know ahead of time.  Omni, you're right.  This guy got caught, but how can we be sure that  this doesn't go on all the time?

            time*treat's avatar - radar

            United States
            Member #13130
            March 30, 2005
            2171 Posts
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            Posted: March 3, 2008, 4:06 pm - IP Logged

            That's what I was wondering.  Does that mean the lottery knows EXACTLY what stores get what tickets.  I know that everything is coded, but I assusmed that they  just  grabbed a box of tickets and shipped them to the retailers as ordered.  I don't like knowing that it is possible that they can know ahead of time.  Omni, you're right.  This guy got caught, but how can we be sure that  this doesn't go on all the time?

            If you were running a lottery wouldn't you have some way of tracking which blocks of tickets went to which retailer?
            How would you be sure tickets weren't stolen? Forged? Altered? 

            In neo-conned Amerika, bank robs you.
            Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms should be the name of a convenience store, not a govnoment agency.

              lottocalgal's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
              CA
              United States
              Member #57222
              December 23, 2007
              587 Posts
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              Posted: March 3, 2008, 4:23 pm - IP Logged

              If you were running a lottery wouldn't you have some way of tracking which blocks of tickets went to which retailer?
              How would you be sure tickets weren't stolen? Forged? Altered? 

              Yes time*treat,

              I do agree with that part.  But it now makes me wonder if there really is a chance for those who play scratchers and don't have an "in".  I'm okay with the lottery knowing where the tickets are, for exactly the reasons you mentioned  but what I don't like is the thought that there are ways that lottery employees can tell their friends  where the winning tickets are.  As a player I really hope that i am totally wrong.

                fja's avatar - gnome1

                United States
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                January 19, 2002
                11932 Posts
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                Posted: March 3, 2008, 4:30 pm - IP Logged

                Maybe he got the light sentence cause he told the judge where to get the other million dollar scratch off winner!!!

                "Everybody has to believe in something...I believe I'll have another beer!"   = W.C.Fields                      

                  Tenaj's avatar - michellea
                  Charlotte NC
                  United States
                  Member #17406
                  June 18, 2005
                  4053 Posts
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                  Posted: March 3, 2008, 4:47 pm - IP Logged

                  That's what I was wondering.  Does that mean the lottery knows EXACTLY what stores get what tickets.  I know that everything is coded, but I assusmed that they  just  grabbed a box of tickets and shipped them to the retailers as ordered.  I don't like knowing that it is possible that they can know ahead of time.  Omni, you're right.  This guy got caught, but how can we be sure that  this doesn't go on all the time?

                  Now that's just great - and just to think I was only concerned about dishonest clerks.

                  takeemtothebank

                    tntea's avatar - Lottery-059.jpg

                    United States
                    Member #5344
                    June 30, 2004
                    23641 Posts
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                    Posted: March 3, 2008, 5:49 pm - IP Logged

                    If you were running a lottery wouldn't you have some way of tracking which blocks of tickets went to which retailer?
                    How would you be sure tickets weren't stolen? Forged? Altered? 

                    They know.  The serial numbers are listed on the invoice.

                         OLD/Vtrac   Lottery Bible         Double Warnings      Thumbs Up TN F34/F44

                      BobP's avatar - bobp avatar.png
                      Dump Water Florida
                      United States
                      Member #380
                      June 5, 2002
                      3104 Posts
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                      Posted: March 3, 2008, 6:30 pm - IP Logged

                      If you were running a lottery wouldn't you have some way of tracking which blocks of tickets went to which retailer?
                      How would you be sure tickets weren't stolen? Forged? Altered? 

                      Tracking rolls of tickets is one thing, knowing what rolls the top prizes are in is totally different, having lottery security use the information to rob the public, priceless.

                      When they tell us something can't happen, stories like this prove they can. 

                      BobP

                        chasingadream's avatar - Archangel 01.jpg

                        United States
                        Member #38687
                        May 3, 2006
                        315 Posts
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                        Posted: March 3, 2008, 6:51 pm - IP Logged

                           Mr. Foreman's attorney was former Hoosier Lottery Director Jack Crawford.

                           Before we get off on the wrong track here, I should emphasize that our lottery had balls when Mr. Crawford was in charge (you can read that however you'd like), and the Hoosier Lottery was making all kinds of money before he left his post. He was the best lottery director we've ever had, and without a doubt the most honest man who has ever held that post.

                           I spoke with Mr. Crawford when the newspapers reported that he was challenging the constitutionality of the disclosure law under which Foreman was charged. You must understand that Indiana has TWO disclosure laws - one for Hoosier Lottery employees and officials and another for all other state employees. The "Disclosing Confidential Lottery Information" law is the one that keeps the Hoosier Lottery in business, and it guarantees that no one who has ever worked there can give evidence against anyone else who was or is currently employed there, including the Director. If you work for the Hoosier Lottery and you talk to the police or to the FBI about the crimes being committed by your superiors or colleagues, you'll face fifty years in prison and, given the way this law is written and phrased, your acquittal is highly unlikely.

                           Now, pay attention, because this is going to get complicated.

                           This case came about because Mr. Foreman had read a fax when everyone else involved, including the intended recipient, was out to lunch. I can only conclude that the fax originated at Scientific Games offices at the Indianapolis Airport, although I have no proof of this. Foreman, being alone in the office at the time, picked up the fax and read it. The fax contained very specific information concerning the location of a top prize-winning scratch-off ticket, and even included the batch number on the pack (the Hoosier Lottery doesn't have access to these batch numbers; they're used to help verify winning tickets, and are only provided by SciGames when a winner is claimed).

                           Foreman put the fax back in the tray. Later that day, he ran into someone he knew (either Foltz or Adkins, I can't remember which) and told him, "If you want a good chance at a winner, go play the twenty dollar scratch-offs in Crown Point." End quote. Notice, please, that he did not identify the name of the store, nor did he identify the game (we actually had three $20 games at that time).

                           Foltz and Adkins then drove to Crown Point. They stopped at a little Mom & Pop store there and bought every $20 scratch-off in the place, spending between seven and eight hundred dollars and, sure enough, they found a ticket worth a million dollars. The next day, one of the men went to Hoosier Lottery headquarters and claimed $25,000, which was half of the first installment. Hoosier Lottery Director Jack Ross paid the claim personally, but told him that his friend would have to come in to claim his share in person. 

                           When the other guy showed up the next day to claim his $25k, he was recognized as an acquaintance of Foreman by William Holcraft, a Hoosier Lottery Internal Security Investigator. He went to the Indiana State Police and launched an investigation, and the next thing you know, reporters began to call Hoosier Lottery officials, asking some embarrassing questions. Holcraft was immediately "fired," but not before signing another "Confidential Agreement" saying that, in consideration of a $7,500 payoff, Holcraft will call the Hoosier Lottery Director and give him a heads-up if Holcraft is questioned about this matter by the police or by the FBI, either now or at any time in the future. Another condition the agreement stipulates is that Holcraft will have to pay back almost ten times that amount if he discloses or discusses any aspect of the case, or of the deal he accepted from the Hoosier Lottery, and that he agrees to plead guilty to any subsequent disclosure charges, whether he hires an attorney or not. I can speak with confidence about this agreement because I have a hard copy of it, thanks to an investigative reporter who sent it to LosingJeff and me. 

                           When Mr. Crawford announced that he was going to challenge the constitutionality of the Hoosier Lottery Disclosure law, I thought that would be the last anyone ever heard of this case. I believed that it would be tied up in court until Foreman died, and then it would just fade away as so many issues do in this state. This plea bargain serves the same purpose; it guarantees that no evidence illustrating the crooked practices of this lottery will ever reach a courtroom.

                           Had Mr. Crawford been successful, the Hoosier Lottery would have fallen, and many, many public officials would have gone to jail.

                           As it stands, and knowing what I know about this case, I believe that fax was actually intended for Mr. Holcraft. There is a possibility that it was meant for Chief of Security Pete Byrne, who was also lightly implicated, but to go into that would mean much more typing on my part, and more reading on yours, and it eventually leads back to Holcraft, anyway. Most likely, though, it was Holcraft's fax but, since he had prematurely involved the state police (another infamously corrupt, state-sanctioned organization), they had to get rid of him as quietly as possible. I firmly believe that if the constitutional issue had gone to federal court, as it should have, Mr. Holcraft would not have made it to the courthouse alive; Hoosier Lottery officials would not have been able to defend themselves against his testimony, and I'm certain that a few elected state officials would have been implicated as well.

                           That's not the whole story, of course, but you now have something more substantive than what's in the article. If you want or need more, just read my posts about the Hoosier Lottery (if you do a search, I'm sure you'll find three or four comments on the subject).

                           I know now exactly what I'll do if I ever win a significant jackpot. I actually fantasize about saying this at the press conference when they ask me what I'm going to do with the money. "I'm going to do what any self-respecting millionaire does in this state. Since ours are the cheapest in the nation, I'm going to buy some Indiana politicians and judges."

                           I'll never get to say that, though. If I ever do win a jackpot of $50M or more, I won't attend a press conference; I'll set up a trust and claim my millions anonymously. I'll still make the payoffs to the crooks in public office, I just won't advertise it. If you want to win the game, you have to play by the same rules the other players follow.

                        WHOAAAAAA!!!!!!!!! Eek 

                        this is mind-blowing......

                        Oogle  waiting patiently for my jackpot

                          Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                          Zeta Reticuli Star System
                          United States
                          Member #30470
                          January 17, 2006
                          10353 Posts
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                          Posted: March 3, 2008, 7:04 pm - IP Logged

                          This certainly brings Losing Jeff's posts to mind!

                          Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                          Lep

                          There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                            TheGameGrl's avatar - character catafly.jpg
                            A long and winding road
                            United States
                            Member #17084
                            June 10, 2005
                            4529 Posts
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                            Posted: March 3, 2008, 9:32 pm - IP Logged

                            out of all the post, The one from Fja makes the most sense! Thanks for that laugh Fja!

                            I personnally would LOVE to have an insider tip to win a cool million.

                             And all those winners list are of their home town. That doesnt mean they bought the winning ticket in that town. I have traveled all thru my state yet I still have to show my home town when I claim.

                            A higher populous town equals more tickets sold, so it stands to reason that more winners would come from those *claimed* areas. The ratio is still the same......

                            ~~Is it true, Is it kind,Is it necessary. ~~~

                             Thanks be to the giving numbers: 1621,912,119 02014

                              spookysoozy's avatar - acepent
                              South Georgia
                              United States
                              Member #100
                              January 28, 2002
                              3734 Posts
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                              Posted: March 3, 2008, 9:39 pm - IP Logged

                              From inception untill about 7 years ago Georgia  dropped 12 - 15 triples a year in the cash 3 game. Now they are down to 2 a year.  Gee.. wonder how that happened.