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N.J. school board member claims $211.7M Powerball jackpot

Topic closed. 45 replies. Last post 7 years ago by BLL512.

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May 16, 2008
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Posted: April 18, 2010, 10:25 pm - IP Logged

So much for remaining a private person.  I just read another article about Ms. McNeil which discloses more personal information includng the location of her last job and the church she attends.  The press is now interviewing her neighbors, co-workers and even her pastor.  There is even this quote from her attorney: 

Her attorney, Perry Pittenger of Scotch Plains, said his lucky client is wary of the notoriety that can follow sudden riches.

"She's not one for the limelight,' Pittenger said. 'While it's wonderful in many respects, it can also be a horror. We've all heard the horror stories about the pitfalls, the scam artists. We're trying to avoid that as best we can.'

I don't want to sound negative and I do wish Ms. McNeil every happiness but there's something about this "very private person" thing that bothers me.  I consider myself a very private person and, if I won a big jackpot, the first thing I would want my attorney and financial advisors to do is find the best way to collect the money without putting my name out there.  Why didn't Mr. Pittenger set up a blind trust and have the money put in the trust?  Isn't that what you hire an attorney for - to protect your interest?  It just doesn't sound like Mr. Pittenger did a very good job of protecting his client's privacy. 

http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20100417/COMMUNITIES/100416068/Attorney-Morristown-lottery-winner-wants-to-avoid-spotlight

There are some states that won't allow you to claim your winnings with a blind trust.  Not sure if NJ is one of them because I couldn't find that information on their website.  However, I do know that Pennsylvania won't allow you to claim winnings with a blind trust.

 

In purchasing a Lottery ticket, the player agrees to comply with and abide by the state Lottery Law and related policies.  The Pennsylvania Lottery’s long-standing public disclosure policy preserves the integrity of the Lottery and its games and ensures players that prizes are fairly awarded.  Under the Pennsylvania Right-to-Know law, all payments made by the commonwealth are public information.  Therefore, when a person wins the Lottery and payment is made, the winner's information is public.  All but three states (Delaware, Kansas and North Dakota) have laws/policies that require the lotteries to release the names and cities of residence of winners.  The Pennsylvania Lottery publishes all or most of the following information on its Web site for public inspection:  Name of the winner(s); city or town; county and state in which the winner(s) reside; name of game won; date prize was won; and amount of prize won.  If the prize is claimed in the name of a legal entity, the name and other relevant information of the entity and its partners, shareholder and beneficiaries will be released. 

    rdgrnr's avatar - walt
    Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
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    Posted: April 18, 2010, 10:45 pm - IP Logged

    In the old days and mostly out west where I lived for a while there was a thing called "frontier justice". (It was long gone when I was there).

    Lawyers new that if they did you wrong they would be hearing from you face to face.

    That was in the days before the laws emasculated and feminized men.

    Nowadays lawyers can do what they want and not have to worry about spitting out teeth later.

    And that is a shame, though some lawyers would be wise to know that some people still live by the feud.


                                                 
                         
                                             

     

     

     

     

                                                                                                       

    "The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing"

                                                                                                --Edmund Burke

     

     

      DelmarvaChick's avatar - wallace
      Ohio
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      Posted: April 18, 2010, 11:21 pm - IP Logged

      So much for remaining a private person.  I just read another article about Ms. McNeil which discloses more personal information includng the location of her last job and the church she attends.  The press is now interviewing her neighbors, co-workers and even her pastor.  There is even this quote from her attorney: 

      Her attorney, Perry Pittenger of Scotch Plains, said his lucky client is wary of the notoriety that can follow sudden riches.

      "She's not one for the limelight,' Pittenger said. 'While it's wonderful in many respects, it can also be a horror. We've all heard the horror stories about the pitfalls, the scam artists. We're trying to avoid that as best we can.'

      I don't want to sound negative and I do wish Ms. McNeil every happiness but there's something about this "very private person" thing that bothers me.  I consider myself a very private person and, if I won a big jackpot, the first thing I would want my attorney and financial advisors to do is find the best way to collect the money without putting my name out there.  Why didn't Mr. Pittenger set up a blind trust and have the money put in the trust?  Isn't that what you hire an attorney for - to protect your interest?  It just doesn't sound like Mr. Pittenger did a very good job of protecting his client's privacy. 

      http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20100417/COMMUNITIES/100416068/Attorney-Morristown-lottery-winner-wants-to-avoid-spotlight

      NJ doesn't allow you to claim using a trust or coporation or anything but your god-given name. I thought they made you do a "photo shoot" too, but I guess not. So if anybody ever wins anything in NJ, they know who you are and what town you live in. Doesn't matter if one person wins or ten, everything gets out. Sucks. If it makes sense they should drive across the bridge and play in Delaware....they keep secrets there :)

        Piaceri's avatar - sarsony1
        Republic of Texas
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        Posted: April 19, 2010, 12:20 am - IP Logged

        Congrats and good luck to the winner.  She sounds like she is doing everything right. Smile

        face

        singlewinnersinglewinnersinglewinner   


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          Posted: April 19, 2010, 11:05 am - IP Logged

          NJ doesn't allow you to claim using a trust or coporation or anything but your god-given name. I thought they made you do a "photo shoot" too, but I guess not. So if anybody ever wins anything in NJ, they know who you are and what town you live in. Doesn't matter if one person wins or ten, everything gets out. Sucks. If it makes sense they should drive across the bridge and play in Delaware....they keep secrets there :)

          Don't have a map in front of me and just having a little fun with you, but isn't the only direct way to get from NJ to Delaware by ferry? Cool

            dpoly1's avatar - driver
            PA
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            Posted: April 19, 2010, 11:21 am - IP Logged

            Don't have a map in front of me and just having a little fun with you, but isn't the only direct way to get from NJ to Delaware by ferry? Cool

            The NJ Turnpike & I 295 connect to Delaware near Wilmington, DE.

            I hope to turn my $2 MM payday from Friday into bigger things .... $88 Million MM CASH or $121.7 Million PB CASH would be nice .... my "friends" at the PA Lottery would ONLY get my name and town as required .... NO MOE!

            I would help those that I choose to help .... and not honor any rquests for money .... e.g. I found another person that studies at the same university that my son attends. She works very hard and only gets to go home every two years and just has enough to get by .... I know others that would need help ....

            Come on PB ....... I have struggled since losing my job in 2001 .... with 2 in College ............... Cool


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              Posted: April 19, 2010, 11:32 am - IP Logged

              The NJ Turnpike & I 295 connect to Delaware near Wilmington, DE.

              I hope to turn my $2 MM payday from Friday into bigger things .... $88 Million MM CASH or $121.7 Million PB CASH would be nice .... my "friends" at the PA Lottery would ONLY get my name and town as required .... NO MOE!

              I would help those that I choose to help .... and not honor any rquests for money .... e.g. I found another person that studies at the same university that my son attends. She works very hard and only gets to go home every two years and just has enough to get by .... I know others that would need help ....

              Come on PB ....... I have struggled since losing my job in 2001 .... with 2 in College ............... Cool

              Ah, OK...just remember taking the Cape May NJ-Lewes Del. ferry years ago. Actually a fun little excursion.

              Good luck to you (and me, lol) Tues. and Wed. nights. Actually, I'm planning on winning Ohio jackpot (8.1 mil.) tonight, lol.

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                Posted: April 19, 2010, 3:33 pm - IP Logged

                So much for remaining a private person.  I just read another article about Ms. McNeil which discloses more personal information includng the location of her last job and the church she attends.  The press is now interviewing her neighbors, co-workers and even her pastor.  There is even this quote from her attorney: 

                Her attorney, Perry Pittenger of Scotch Plains, said his lucky client is wary of the notoriety that can follow sudden riches.

                "She's not one for the limelight,' Pittenger said. 'While it's wonderful in many respects, it can also be a horror. We've all heard the horror stories about the pitfalls, the scam artists. We're trying to avoid that as best we can.'

                I don't want to sound negative and I do wish Ms. McNeil every happiness but there's something about this "very private person" thing that bothers me.  I consider myself a very private person and, if I won a big jackpot, the first thing I would want my attorney and financial advisors to do is find the best way to collect the money without putting my name out there.  Why didn't Mr. Pittenger set up a blind trust and have the money put in the trust?  Isn't that what you hire an attorney for - to protect your interest?  It just doesn't sound like Mr. Pittenger did a very good job of protecting his client's privacy. 

                http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20100417/COMMUNITIES/100416068/Attorney-Morristown-lottery-winner-wants-to-avoid-spotlight

                Just an idea that I thought of:

                For the states that do NOT allow a blind trust or other way to remain out of the spotlight, there is a "loophole" around it.

                 

                1. Once you confirm that your ticket is the winning ticket, get a new apartment.  You have the money, it's no big deal.

                2. Either quit your job or take an extended leave of absence.  Either way, DO NOT tell anyone from either the press or the lottery where you used to work.

                3. All they get is your name and your "new" address.

                 

                I'm not sure if this is cladproof, since really good journalists can find what they need, but it might help.  That's my two cents.

                  dpoly1's avatar - driver
                  PA
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                  Posted: April 19, 2010, 4:31 pm - IP Logged

                  Ah, OK...just remember taking the Cape May NJ-Lewes Del. ferry years ago. Actually a fun little excursion.

                  Good luck to you (and me, lol) Tues. and Wed. nights. Actually, I'm planning on winning Ohio jackpot (8.1 mil.) tonight, lol.

                  I took the Cape May-Lewes ferry also, I enjoyed, wife was green ... lol!

                  Good luck to us all!

                  Big Grin

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                    Posted: April 19, 2010, 5:48 pm - IP Logged

                    I would probably find a cheap apartment somewhere in another part of the state and use that as my "Address".  I would not want to move and be away from family....and I like my house....I don't want a bigger house and then pay bigger taxes.  I guess disconnecting the phone at the house would discourage people from calling, but the mailing and knocking on the door would be bothersome.

                    As much as I like my job, I would not want the hassle of being bothered or sued....there have been news items of people "claiming" to have contributed to buying a ticket or having a verbal agreement.  I wouldn't want to quit and do nothing either. This is where I feel conflicted.  I have read about people that win sometimes feel out of place because they want to accomplish something on their own merits.  I know that volunteering is something that I would do more of if I won, I also would want to spend more time helping my family.  There have been lottery winners that have said, looking after the money is  a full time job too.  This is the part where I would have to find balance.  I would also want to start a business related to a hobby of mine.  This is why I feel that I haven't hit the big one yet....there are still unresolved issues on what I would do with my life.

                    I know that tax/family law/ estate planning attys would be of use regarding the money, but the other important thing to discuss with an attorney is protection from the public for family, especially if you have young children.  Attys involved in criminal cases or cases of high profile can probably provide the best advice on handling this.  I have thought about this in terms of protection.

                    I guess that's why it is important to have the so-called "decision free zone" after a win.....lots of things to think about.  I know that if I won I would be very giddy at first....then nervous in trying to get everything organized.  THe good thing is that some problems would go away, but there might be bigger issues to deal with.

                    In PA, I would have 60 days to file a claim for cash or annuity on the big ones, but 1 year to physically claim the winnings. And it is all public.

                    In Md, I could claim anonymously, but only have 182 days to get my ducks in a row.

                     

                    So there's the tradeoff....anonymous claim-shorter claim time-higher taxes OR public claim- 1yr claim time, lower taxes

                      HaveABall's avatar - rocket

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                      Posted: April 19, 2010, 10:36 pm - IP Logged

                      "McNeil's win also marks the first time one state has ever sold the only winning ticket for both a Powerball jackpot and a Mega Millions jackpot, said Dominick DeMarco, a spokesman for the New Jersey Lottery Commission."

                      GREAT WIN SANDRA!Lovies

                      Having several millions of dollars in my financial accounts means receiving several valuable services each day!

                      Disney

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                        New Jersey
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                        Posted: April 20, 2010, 9:49 am - IP Logged

                        There are some states that won't allow you to claim your winnings with a blind trust.  Not sure if NJ is one of them because I couldn't find that information on their website.  However, I do know that Pennsylvania won't allow you to claim winnings with a blind trust.

                         

                        In purchasing a Lottery ticket, the player agrees to comply with and abide by the state Lottery Law and related policies.  The Pennsylvania Lottery’s long-standing public disclosure policy preserves the integrity of the Lottery and its games and ensures players that prizes are fairly awarded.  Under the Pennsylvania Right-to-Know law, all payments made by the commonwealth are public information.  Therefore, when a person wins the Lottery and payment is made, the winner's information is public.  All but three states (Delaware, Kansas and North Dakota) have laws/policies that require the lotteries to release the names and cities of residence of winners.  The Pennsylvania Lottery publishes all or most of the following information on its Web site for public inspection:  Name of the winner(s); city or town; county and state in which the winner(s) reside; name of game won; date prize was won; and amount of prize won.  If the prize is claimed in the name of a legal entity, the name and other relevant information of the entity and its partners, shareholder and beneficiaries will be released. 

                        IGlenn, after reading your post, I did a little research.  I was surprised to found that the New Jersey lottery laws were amended in September 2007 to make it virtually impossible to transfer or assign winnings to another person or entity without a court order!!!  Makes me wonder how many other states have taken this ridiculous kind of action to keep winners from protecting their identity.  In case anyone is interested in reading the Laws, here's the link:   http://www.state.nj.us/lottery/general/6-4-1_lot_law.htm#13

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                          NY
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                          Posted: April 20, 2010, 2:14 pm - IP Logged

                          IGlenn, after reading your post, I did a little research.  I was surprised to found that the New Jersey lottery laws were amended in September 2007 to make it virtually impossible to transfer or assign winnings to another person or entity without a court order!!!  Makes me wonder how many other states have taken this ridiculous kind of action to keep winners from protecting their identity.  In case anyone is interested in reading the Laws, here's the link:   http://www.state.nj.us/lottery/general/6-4-1_lot_law.htm#13

                          This law has nothing to do with the identity of winners. It's a consumer protection law designed to protect winners of annuities who might consider selling their future payments for cash upfront from outfits like JG Wentworth.

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                            Posted: April 20, 2010, 2:27 pm - IP Logged

                            Just an idea that I thought of:

                            For the states that do NOT allow a blind trust or other way to remain out of the spotlight, there is a "loophole" around it.

                             

                            1. Once you confirm that your ticket is the winning ticket, get a new apartment.  You have the money, it's no big deal.

                            2. Either quit your job or take an extended leave of absence.  Either way, DO NOT tell anyone from either the press or the lottery where you used to work.

                            3. All they get is your name and your "new" address.

                             

                            I'm not sure if this is cladproof, since really good journalists can find what they need, but it might help.  That's my two cents.

                            The idea of creating an alterate address might work, but there are some serious limitations.

                            1. The lottery will anounce where the ticket was sold, so using an address that's far away probably won't throw anyone off the tracl if htey really want to figure out who you are.

                            2. What's your name? If your name is John Smith and the ticket was bought near a large town, you've probaly go tnothing to worry about, as liong as you don't do a press conference and let them get a picture. The problem is that many lotteries require that the winner allow a picture for promotional use. If your name is at all unusual,  you might  be completely SOL. How many  people do you think are named Rush Limbaugh or Newt Gingrich, besides the ones we already know about?

                            3. It's a lot harder to keep it secret from people who already know you than keeping it secret from strangers. If you quit your job shortly after winning with a ticket that was bought close to your job, your coworkers are going to  figure it out even if your name is John Smith and there are a dozen other John Smith's in the same town.

                            4. If you rent an apartment and then claim the prize without having changed the address registered with the DMV, the lottery is going to release the address on file with the DMV. Presumably that will be your real address.

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                              Posted: April 26, 2010, 12:47 pm - IP Logged

                              Yah the man from indiana that didn't claim the prize is me.  Some man named Mark truelock told the town of Morocco and a man named Josh Clemmons.  Clemmons is a satanist and broke in with tranquilizers and stold the ticket that was on a desk under a paper.  If you see either one of them bust them once in the head.  True story and the law is a failure.