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$14.5M Texas Lotto jackpot claimed

Topic closed. 20 replies. Last post 2 years ago by mikeintexas.

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Piaceri's avatar - sarsony1
Republic of Texas
United States
Member #57557
January 9, 2008
1095 Posts
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Posted: January 6, 2015, 10:38 pm - IP Logged

I read in the last commission meeting minutes that a bill was introduced that, if passed, would grant anonymity to winners of a million dollars or more. We'll see what happens.

Let's hope it passes.

 

Congrats to Brandi!

face

singlewinnersinglewinnersinglewinner   

    mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
    Texas Panhandle
    United States
    Member #136843
    December 20, 2012
    1257 Posts
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    Posted: January 7, 2015, 2:33 am - IP Logged

    Texas should change the law to guarantee winners anonymity. It is completely crazy to require winners to go public. It puts enormous pressure on winners, and many can't deal with it.

     

    If you come into a large sum and everyone knows about it, you will be inundated with people seeking help. It takes a strong person to be able to resist it. But if you try to solve all the world's problems, you will create a big problem for yourself, you will go broke.

     

    If you live in Texas, please contact your state politicians and ask them to have a good look at this. Other lotteries allow winners to remain anonymous, such as Australian state lotteries. If the Aussies can do it, surely the Yanks can?

    Ah, but there will always be those who would think the prize wasn't awarded, and instead lined the pockets of the lottery commission or politicians.  Some states have a Freedom of Information law that mandates the winner, the amount won and the winner’s hometown have to be made public...all in the name of "transparency".   Some states allow the prize to be claimed by a trust or limited liability company which creates a buffer for the winner's identity.  I think a good compromise would be to have the lottery entity wait six months or even 90 days before releasing that information.

    That said, it's going to be hard keeping it a secret, especially if you live in a fairly small town like I do.   All it would take would be some employee at the bank/investment firm that received the transfer of funds blabbing about it to their spouse or a mouthy third cousin being anything but discrete about your winnings. 

    Yes, there are many stories about the problems lottery winners face, esp. in regards to people bothering them.   Personally, I won't have any problem saying no, but IF I ever win, begging mails won't even reach me because I'll be gone and the first thing I will do is take away my mailbox in front of this house.  If the P.O. can't deliver it, I won't get it.  (I don't get bills or statements because I do all that online)  For anyone planning on staying in the same house, then they can buy a stamp to mark mails from unknown senders with "Refused.  Return to sender", but after you win, a trip to the local post office to find out the best course of action on that would be yet another thing on the list of things to do.

    Change your telephone number and unlist it if you're staying put. Sure, there are ways people can find out your new number, but turn the ringer off and buy a large message capacity answering machine. (or get the mailbox feature w/ the new phone number...let it fill up and subsequent callers will get "Inbox full" recording.  I've also seen phones that reject calls from any but programmed numbers. )  Buy one of those Trac or similar phones and give that number out to friends and family.  If THAT number gets out,  crush the phone with a hammer and buy another one.  Hey, you can afford it, right?

    Not long ago I was reading a story about some Illinois lottery winner being attacked by a couple of men who broke in, expecting to find the winnings there.  All I have to say to that is if someone breaks into my house after I win, then they'll be shot with a larger caliber and more expensive gun than they would if they did it now.  I suppose that's not an option in some states/countries, but thank goodness I live in Texas!  I'll also have a dog- or two-,  a security system and cameras on my (new) property.   Sure, that's a hassle, but one I'll welcome in exchange for winning the lottery.


    A people that elect corrupt politicians, impostors, thieves and traitors are not victims...but accomplices.
     - George Orwell

      Bondi Junction
      Australia
      Member #57242
      December 24, 2007
      1102 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: January 7, 2015, 5:43 am - IP Logged

      Ah, but there will always be those who would think the prize wasn't awarded, and instead lined the pockets of the lottery commission or politicians.  Some states have a Freedom of Information law that mandates the winner, the amount won and the winner’s hometown have to be made public...all in the name of "transparency".   Some states allow the prize to be claimed by a trust or limited liability company which creates a buffer for the winner's identity.  I think a good compromise would be to have the lottery entity wait six months or even 90 days before releasing that information.

      That said, it's going to be hard keeping it a secret, especially if you live in a fairly small town like I do.   All it would take would be some employee at the bank/investment firm that received the transfer of funds blabbing about it to their spouse or a mouthy third cousin being anything but discrete about your winnings. 

      Yes, there are many stories about the problems lottery winners face, esp. in regards to people bothering them.   Personally, I won't have any problem saying no, but IF I ever win, begging mails won't even reach me because I'll be gone and the first thing I will do is take away my mailbox in front of this house.  If the P.O. can't deliver it, I won't get it.  (I don't get bills or statements because I do all that online)  For anyone planning on staying in the same house, then they can buy a stamp to mark mails from unknown senders with "Refused.  Return to sender", but after you win, a trip to the local post office to find out the best course of action on that would be yet another thing on the list of things to do.

      Change your telephone number and unlist it if you're staying put. Sure, there are ways people can find out your new number, but turn the ringer off and buy a large message capacity answering machine. (or get the mailbox feature w/ the new phone number...let it fill up and subsequent callers will get "Inbox full" recording.  I've also seen phones that reject calls from any but programmed numbers. )  Buy one of those Trac or similar phones and give that number out to friends and family.  If THAT number gets out,  crush the phone with a hammer and buy another one.  Hey, you can afford it, right?

      Not long ago I was reading a story about some Illinois lottery winner being attacked by a couple of men who broke in, expecting to find the winnings there.  All I have to say to that is if someone breaks into my house after I win, then they'll be shot with a larger caliber and more expensive gun than they would if they did it now.  I suppose that's not an option in some states/countries, but thank goodness I live in Texas!  I'll also have a dog- or two-,  a security system and cameras on my (new) property.   Sure, that's a hassle, but one I'll welcome in exchange for winning the lottery.

      In Australia lottery winners are allowed to remain anonymous. It dates back to 1960, the NSW Government introduced a lottery to build the now famous Opera House. One person won one hundred thousand pounds, the equivalent of millions today. The winner's name was published in the papers. 

       

      The winner's eight year old son was kidnapped for ransom, and later killed, search NSW lottery kidnapping. As a result, the law was charged to allow anonymity. Hopefully, it won't take a similar tragedy before law is charged.

      We all get a lot out of lotteries!

        Get paid's avatar - Lottery-062.jpg
        texas
        United States
        Member #152324
        February 11, 2014
        168 Posts
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        Posted: January 7, 2015, 2:15 pm - IP Logged

        Well I,m quite sure theirs a few people in cypress tx. who knows Brandy Jackson,she could had a trust,an no one would have know the winners identity.

          Bondi Junction
          Australia
          Member #57242
          December 24, 2007
          1102 Posts
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          Posted: January 25, 2015, 6:17 pm - IP Logged

          "The claimant requested minimal publicity"

           

          The claimant should be allowed to request anonymity.

          We all get a lot out of lotteries!

            mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
            Texas Panhandle
            United States
            Member #136843
            December 20, 2012
            1257 Posts
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            Posted: January 26, 2015, 12:44 am - IP Logged

            "The claimant requested minimal publicity"

             

            The claimant should be allowed to request anonymity.

            Since you don't live in Texas, you have no say in the matter.  Only six states allow anonymous claiming, so don't make it out like Texas is the only one that doesn't.    I tried to explain to you the reasoning behind it (transparency) and I thought that since you quoted my post, you had read it.  Apparently not.  If someone from Texas wants to remain anonymous, then they can always create a trust to claim it.   I don't know about any other non-anonymous claiming states - that's their business.

            That Thorne kidnapping was tragic, but I wonder why his parents thought life would go on normally, especially after getting such huge publicity.  The blame falls on the kidnappers, of course, but I question the parent's judgment.   The percentage of lottery winners who have been killed is a very small number and I'd wager most winners who die before their time are done in by their own poor choices, i.e. drinking or drugs.   I said it before, but will say it again:  I'd be the very worst choice to try to rob or have my home broken into after I won.  It would be unwise for someone to do that now, but if I won the lottery and they tried it, then they'd be shot with a more expensive and larger caliber weapon.  If I was someone who happened to live in a gun-free city or state, then I would move somewhere immediately and keep that information secret or hire a security firm or bodyguard, esp. for my children. 

            FYI, "Yanks" is a mild pejorative to people in Texas and the south and an out-and-out insult if used in a certain context.  Using it to describe folks from this part of the country makes you sound like a yobbo.


            A people that elect corrupt politicians, impostors, thieves and traitors are not victims...but accomplices.
             - George Orwell