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Lottery scam victim lost life savings

Topic closed. 54 replies. Last post 12 months ago by oknazevad.

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CARBOB's avatar - FL LOTTERY_LOGO.png
ORLANDO, FLORIDA
United States
Member #4924
June 3, 2004
5893 Posts
Offline
Posted: November 7, 2015, 12:44 pm - IP Logged

"he had a winning lottery ticket and needed $40,000 to collect the total winnings." That rose a red flag for me. I could understand if the guy said I'm out of gas and I can't reach the lottery retailer to collect my winnings. I don't want my family to find out because their all money grubbers. Me, if a guy approached me like that. I would've wanted to fully research the winning ticket. I ran into a paraplegic the other day at a truck stop. He needed money for gas. The problem was, his legs were amputated from the knee caps. I was like, "how do you need gas money and you can't even reach the gas pedals?" He said, "Oh, it's for my friend who is at the pump." I was thinking, well, why isn't he over here asking for gas money. I just walked off.

That was the correct response. Don't fall for no shyster, especially, those Charity shysters, they are the worse. I had a woman call, wanting a donation for the families of fallen police officers. I asked her, what percentage of my donation will go to the family? She replied, ten percent, slam, hung up. BTW, I have 2 brothers living in S.c. One in Lancaster, the other in Cheraw. Welcome to LP!!!

    music*'s avatar - nw bookeep.jpg
    Happy California
    United States
    Member #157856
    August 2, 2014
    1511 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: November 7, 2015, 1:10 pm - IP Logged

    Lottery winners understand how to use the word,"NO".  A powerful two letter word.

     I've been rich and I've been poor. Believe me, rich is better. 

     Attributed to Joe E. Lewis and others

      Avatar
      Chicago, Il
      United States
      Member #155131
      May 9, 2014
      28 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: November 7, 2015, 2:12 pm - IP Logged

      Hi, what's your name? "mr doomass.....Hi mr DUMB A$$

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        Simpsonville
        United States
        Member #163189
        January 22, 2015
        668 Posts
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        Posted: November 7, 2015, 3:40 pm - IP Logged

        That was the correct response. Don't fall for no shyster, especially, those Charity shysters, they are the worse. I had a woman call, wanting a donation for the families of fallen police officers. I asked her, what percentage of my donation will go to the family? She replied, ten percent, slam, hung up. BTW, I have 2 brothers living in S.c. One in Lancaster, the other in Cheraw. Welcome to LP!!!

        You are so correct, and I hate that I can tell that some of my charities sold my phone # to other charities, particularly my animal charities.  My least favorite was cancer awareness.  Their phone calls were almost harassing in nature.  I finally called them back and left a message that I will never donate one dime and to stop calling.  Then there's this jackass from E. KY calling for some police or sheriff's fundraiser.  Always calls here with the wrong name.

          Erzulieredeyes's avatar - spider miss.png
          Painesville, Ohio
          United States
          Member #117718
          October 12, 2011
          215 Posts
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          Posted: November 7, 2015, 3:59 pm - IP Logged

          Definition of a victim, per Merriam-Webster:

           

          a person who has been attacked, injured, robbed, or killed by someone else

          : a person who is cheated or fooled by someone else

          : someone or something that is harmed by an unpleasant event (such as an illness or accident)

           

          Though the term victim often is associated with the first degree of distinction, as the second statement indicates, force is not  a requirement to be a victim.   So, indeed they ARE victims.

          I agree, common sense would prevent such events, however it does not displace the facts of someone being cheated or fooled by someone else, making them a victim.

          a

          I don't care what Merriam's dictionary says, the dictionary "used" to say that marriage was between 1 man and 1 woman. Now it doesn't say that. These people are not victims they are "fools" look that definition up. If anything the so called victims are the scammers to me because they were willing to take advantage by taking the ticket for monetary gains. If he was such a good Christian and trusting he should have helped with the paperworks and drive him to the nearest lottery office or retailer....and last time I checked cvs didn't sell lotteries at least not in my town. I'm sure he wasn't new to playing the lottery either otherwise he wouldn't have been so fast to give away his savings to gain $8000 that he still would have had to pay taxes on lol.

           

          Everything about this story made me chuckle.... esp the part to make himself look innocent and by saying he is a good Christian trying to help....Lol good Christians first of all dont play the lottery. God's laws forbid chasing get rich quick schemes.... any " good Christian" knows that!

            Erzulieredeyes's avatar - spider miss.png
            Painesville, Ohio
            United States
            Member #117718
            October 12, 2011
            215 Posts
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            Posted: November 7, 2015, 4:18 pm - IP Logged

            That was the correct response. Don't fall for no shyster, especially, those Charity shysters, they are the worse. I had a woman call, wanting a donation for the families of fallen police officers. I asked her, what percentage of my donation will go to the family? She replied, ten percent, slam, hung up. BTW, I have 2 brothers living in S.c. One in Lancaster, the other in Cheraw. Welcome to LP!!!

            I hate when someone calls me about donating to their charity and ask how much do I have to donate I ask them how much do they have to donate to me. Lol They usually hang up on me. I dont donate my money to phone calls. I send my money to real humans and to real organizations of my choice.

            I don't want to fall "victim" of a telephone scam.

              music*'s avatar - nw bookeep.jpg
              Happy California
              United States
              Member #157856
              August 2, 2014
              1511 Posts
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              Posted: November 7, 2015, 5:24 pm - IP Logged

               When you plan on donating do your homework. Check the legitimacy and history of the organization.

               When you give then give anonymously. The receiver will not know who gave and will not track you down for more gifts.

               I've been rich and I've been poor. Believe me, rich is better. 

               Attributed to Joe E. Lewis and others

                Avatar
                Baton Rouge, LA
                United States
                Member #4602
                May 7, 2004
                699 Posts
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                Posted: November 7, 2015, 6:21 pm - IP Logged

                When are people going to learn if you need to pay money to claim a prize, it's a scam pure and simple.

                I've read there's another scam involving altered lottery tickets that reminds me of this one.  A guy claims he has a winning lottery ticket, but doesn't want to claim it himself because he's in the country illegally and doesn't want to get deported. He offers to sell the ticket at near face value, but when the purchaser goes to claim it, it's a forgery. I wonder if that was going on here too.

                Prisoner Six

                "I am not a number, I am a free man!"

                  Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                  United States
                  Member #142499
                  May 13, 2013
                  1182 Posts
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                  Posted: November 7, 2015, 6:26 pm - IP Logged

                  Let me get this straight: $32,000 is every single penny you have in the world. It's not in an insured bank account collecting interest, it's not even in a safety deposit box. It's in your house, so that tells me that you don't trust banks. But you trust a total stranger you met that day, not only to hand over your life savings, but to be at your house. 

                  When was the last time anyone brought a total stranger back to their house (in this case, 2 total strangers) and made it clear to them that  large sums of cash at are kept at said house.

                  Forget the scam.for a minute and think about just that. 

                  Sorry, I can't classify this guy as a victim. I don't see how the "victim" definition covers this scenario.

                  If he isn't mentally challenged then he was simply a person blinded by greed. This was the equivalent of an unsecured investment. He put up money in the hopes of getting a substantially large return, with no proof, no documented paperwork, not even an ID check. He took a shot and it backfired. As they said in Matchstick Men, they cannot scam an honest person.

                  I might wake up early and go running.  I might also wake up and win the lottery.

                  The odds are about the same.

                    mypiemaster's avatar - 2015021003pileofcash
                    JACKPOT HUNTER

                    United States
                    Member #141034
                    April 2, 2013
                    1408 Posts
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                    Posted: November 7, 2015, 6:31 pm - IP Logged

                    I think this is a very lucky individual. His ass could have been killed for crying out loud.

                    Seek and ye shall find -Matt. 7:7 ...Ask and ye shall receive -John 16:24 ...Give and it shall be given unto you -Luke 6:38 ...Be careful what you ask for!!! -Mypiemaster 1:1

                    Having Money Solves Problems That Not Having Money Creates Yes Nod ****John Carlton****

                      Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                      United States
                      Member #142499
                      May 13, 2013
                      1182 Posts
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                      Posted: November 7, 2015, 6:33 pm - IP Logged

                      I think this is a very lucky individual. His ass could have been killed for crying out loud.

                      IKR??? How could he possibly have taken these guys to his house?

                      I might wake up early and go running.  I might also wake up and win the lottery.

                      The odds are about the same.

                        Erzulieredeyes's avatar - spider miss.png
                        Painesville, Ohio
                        United States
                        Member #117718
                        October 12, 2011
                        215 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: November 7, 2015, 6:36 pm - IP Logged

                        Let me get this straight: $32,000 is every single penny you have in the world. It's not in an insured bank account collecting interest, it's not even in a safety deposit box. It's in your house, so that tells me that you don't trust banks. But you trust a total stranger you met that day, not only to hand over your life savings, but to be at your house. 

                        When was the last time anyone brought a total stranger back to their house (in this case, 2 total strangers) and made it clear to them that  large sums of cash at are kept at said house.

                        Forget the scam.for a minute and think about just that. 

                        Sorry, I can't classify this guy as a victim. I don't see how the "victim" definition covers this scenario.

                        If he isn't mentally challenged then he was simply a person blinded by greed. This was the equivalent of an unsecured investment. He put up money in the hopes of getting a substantially large return, with no proof, no documented paperwork, not even an ID check. He took a shot and it backfired. As they said in Matchstick Men, they cannot scam an honest person.

                        thank you.... finally somebody that gets it, he is truly not a victim. I like the way u worded it "unsecured investment" lol....

                          Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                          United States
                          Member #142499
                          May 13, 2013
                          1182 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: November 7, 2015, 7:02 pm - IP Logged

                          Definition of a victim, per Merriam-Webster:

                           

                          a person who has been attacked, injured, robbed, or killed by someone else

                          : a person who is cheated or fooled by someone else

                          : someone or something that is harmed by an unpleasant event (such as an illness or accident)

                           

                          Though the term victim often is associated with the first degree of distinction, as the second statement indicates, force is not  a requirement to be a victim.   So, indeed they ARE victims.

                          I agree, common sense would prevent such events, however it does not displace the facts of someone being cheated or fooled by someone else, making them a victim.

                          a

                          I get that he was fooled, and I get that the police classify this as a scam, but if you add common sense into the equation, would you still consider him a victim? 

                          If you give $5 to a panhandler and he spends it on liquor instead of food, were you scammed? There was no force or even coercion. Does his lie relegate you to the rank of "victim" or do give knowing full well that it may not go towards food, but you just hope that it will? I personally believe that when you opt to willingly (and gladly) turn over money to a total stranger with absolutely no supporting documentation that would legally require its return to you, it's tantamount to a monetary gift, regardless of what verbal promises are made. The only reason it's even an issue is because of the amount involved.

                          I might wake up early and go running.  I might also wake up and win the lottery.

                          The odds are about the same.

                            TheGameGrl's avatar - character catafly.jpg
                            A long and winding road
                            United States
                            Member #17084
                            June 10, 2005
                            4524 Posts
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                            Posted: November 7, 2015, 7:44 pm - IP Logged

                            yes less then versed ppl use the victim blaming stance. Those who cannot comprehend- blame.

                            I tend to see this as a scam and it hit its target. Bernie Madof carried out his with wealthy people. Guess it goes to show that money buys neither wisdom or intelligence. That you'll find thru life and experiences...

                            ~~Is it true, Is it kind,Is it necessary. ~~~

                             Thanks be to the giving numbers: 1621,912,119 02014

                              realtorjim's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcT7U3t20NgScoPlxOqLT6TR0vQeJNBV3_tTswe1XeFDTsdw3NLZ

                              United States
                              Member #106923
                              February 27, 2011
                              476 Posts
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                              Posted: November 7, 2015, 7:48 pm - IP Logged

                              I get that he was fooled, and I get that the police classify this as a scam, but if you add common sense into the equation, would you still consider him a victim? 

                              If you give $5 to a panhandler and he spends it on liquor instead of food, were you scammed? There was no force or even coercion. Does his lie relegate you to the rank of "victim" or do give knowing full well that it may not go towards food, but you just hope that it will? I personally believe that when you opt to willingly (and gladly) turn over money to a total stranger with absolutely no supporting documentation that would legally require its return to you, it's tantamount to a monetary gift, regardless of what verbal promises are made. The only reason it's even an issue is because of the amount involved.

                              As I stated, common sense was lacking but he IS still a victim, even though some may say greedy, who knows, but a victim none the less.  Yes he may have been thinking of the money he thought he was going to capitalize on but how in the world does this dismiss the victim aspect.  The panhandler scenario is not a comparative analogy.  By giving $5 to a panhandler there is no expectation of the money being returned.  Thus, completely irrelevant to a victim status.

                                I'm feeling a jackpot win coming my way!