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Connecticut considers allowing online lottery ticket sales

Connecticut LotteryConnecticut Lottery: Connecticut considers allowing online lottery ticket sales
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HARTFORD, Ct. — Lawmakers are considering legislation that would move the Connecticut Lottery online for state residents.

A bill raised by the legislature's Public Safety and Security Committee would allow for lottery tickets to be sold online through a licensed vendor. If the bill moves forward, Connecticut would be one of the few states in the country to offer online lottery tickets. It would also be one of the only states to sell online tickets through an outside vendor.

"I've never heard of this before," said state Rep. Stephen Dargan, D-West Haven, co-chair of the committee. "I thought it was somewhat different."

The Illinois Lottery and Georgia Lottery have been selling tickets online since 2012, but tickets are only available directly through the state lottery website, not a vendor. Direct online sales have been available through the Michigan Lottery since 2014. Online lottery tickets were sold through two primary vendors in Minnesota until last year, when the state's legislature shut the online program down. New York offers online subscriptions for certain lottery games, allowing residents to order tickets and receive winnings online or through a check sent to their residence.

He doesn't think the proposal will have much support, Dargan said, but that lawmakers are eager to learn more about the "unique" idea. A public hearing on the bill will be held Tuesday in Hartford.

"I think that's why we're hearing it, to get an education and find out what's going on in the gaming world with this," he said, noting that the proposal likely came from a lobbyist representing a company that would like to sell tickets online.

Under the pending legislation in Connecticut, a lottery sales agent — someone who is licensed to sell lottery products — would enter into an agreement with a company to sell lottery tickets online. The company would then purchase tickets on behalf of others through the sales agent, and would be tasked with redeeming and distributing winnings.

Any company selling tickets online would not be able to charge a service fee or accept credit cards. In addition, the company would have to verify that tickets could only be purchased by those in state who are 18 and older. The legislation requires that the company allow the purchaser to view the ticket before a winner is determined.

The state Department of Consumer Protection issues licenses to lottery vendors in the state, and would also serve as the regulatory body for online lottery sales, according to the legislation. Companies that sell online tickets would need to be licensed through state, just like a vendor at a convenience store. State law allows the DCP to conduct in-depth background checks of lottery vendors, including an analysis of corporate and personal financial assets.

Connecticut Lottery and DCP officials say they didn't propose the legislation and declined to comment further on what online ticket sales would mean for the state's lottery system, which contributed $319.7 million in revenue to the general fund last year. A majority of those funds, around $54 million, went to the state Department of Education. Other states have pursued an online lottery to boost ticket sales and revenue, but anti-gambling advocates have expressed concern about the accessibility of tickets to those who have gambling problems or are under 18.

He shares those concerns, Dargan said, but legislators are interested in learning more.

"A lot of times, we have these public hearings so we're able to let committee members ask questions you might not think of yourself," he said. "There's a lot of good give and take."

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5 comments. Last comment 9 months ago by cbr$.
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Groppo's avatar - cat anm.gif

United States
Member #162631
January 7, 2015
507 Posts
Offline
Posted: March 8, 2016, 3:57 pm - IP Logged

So what?  Connecticut gets permission to sell lotto online.  Big Deal?

This hi tech thing, which is NOT rocket science should already be available nationwide. 

Let's see them do something really challenging - keep the outsiders out, and USA people in.

I went to a shop today, where they sell clothing, and other little gifts, like chocolates.   I asked a store associate where the chocolate turtles are.   And, it turns out they didn't speak English.  Fed up with the lame practice of hiring people who don't speak English,   I said "Thanks anyway, go learn your English".

I mean what else could I say? 

  • Don't chase the numbers you play.
  • Play only numbers you've already played, plus however many random picks.
  • But, ALWAYS the regular numbers you play.  This will make you a winner, not a chaser.
            (so far, though, I've yet to win any significant lotto prize)
    TheMeatman2005's avatar - lightening
    Brooklyn, NY
    United States
    Member #169723
    October 29, 2015
    879 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: March 8, 2016, 3:59 pm - IP Logged

    Taking it to an outside vendor seems like it's trouble waiting to happen.

    Under the pending legislation in Connecticut, a lottery sales agent — someone who is licensed to sell lottery products — would enter into an agreement with a company to sell lottery tickets online. The company would then purchase tickets on behalf of others through the sales agent, and would be tasked with redeeming and distributing winnings.

    This sounds something like what "The Lotter" already does.

    Any company selling tickets online would not be able to charge a service fee or accept credit cards. In addition, the company would have to verify that tickets could only be purchased by those in state who are 18 and older. The legislation requires that the company allow the purchaser to view the ticket before a winner is determined.

    OK, so no service fee, but they still would probably still make their seller commission

    How would people buy and play if they couldn't pay with a credit card?

    The Meatman

    “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket.” Will Rogers

    Winning happens in a flash, Like A Bolt Of Lightning!  Patriot

      LiveInGreenBay's avatar - driver
      Green Bay
      United States
      Member #169391
      October 15, 2015
      1249 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: March 9, 2016, 4:26 pm - IP Logged

      How can you buy a lottery ticket online without a credit card?

      Never give up.  Banana

        LiveInGreenBay's avatar - driver
        Green Bay
        United States
        Member #169391
        October 15, 2015
        1249 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: March 9, 2016, 4:30 pm - IP Logged

        Taking it to an outside vendor seems like it's trouble waiting to happen.

        Under the pending legislation in Connecticut, a lottery sales agent — someone who is licensed to sell lottery products — would enter into an agreement with a company to sell lottery tickets online. The company would then purchase tickets on behalf of others through the sales agent, and would be tasked with redeeming and distributing winnings.

        This sounds something like what "The Lotter" already does.

        Any company selling tickets online would not be able to charge a service fee or accept credit cards. In addition, the company would have to verify that tickets could only be purchased by those in state who are 18 and older. The legislation requires that the company allow the purchaser to view the ticket before a winner is determined.

        OK, so no service fee, but they still would probably still make their seller commission

        How would people buy and play if they couldn't pay with a credit card?

        Hey Meatman, I posted a comment here before I read your post.  How would people pay for those tickets and another point...What if your numbers come up and the computer system crashes?  If you print out your tickets, would that satisfy the lottery office?

        Never give up.  Banana

          cbr$'s avatar - maren
          Cordova,Al.
          United States
          Member #104482
          January 15, 2011
          4940 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: March 9, 2016, 6:02 pm - IP Logged

          Lawmakers are considering legislation that would move the Connecticut Lottery online for state residents.

          A bill raised by the legislature's Public Safety and Security Committee would allow for lottery tickets to be sold online through a licensed vendor. If the bill moves forward, Connecticut would be one of the few states in the country to offer online lottery tickets. It would also be one of the only states to sell online tickets through an outside vendor.

          "I've never heard of this before," said state Rep. Stephen Dargan, D-West Haven, co-chair of the committee. "I thought it was somewhat different."

          The Illinois Lottery and Georgia Lottery have been selling tickets online since 2012, but tickets are only available directly through the state lottery website, not a vendor. Direct online sales have been available through the Michigan Lottery since 2014. Online lottery tickets were sold through two primary vendors in Minnesota until last year, when the state's legislature shut the online program down. New York offers online subscriptions for certain lottery games, allowing residents to order tickets and receive winnings online or through a check sent to their residence.

          He doesn't think the proposal will have much support, Dargan said, but that lawmakers are eager to learn more about the "unique" idea. A public hearing on the bill will be held Tuesday in Hartford.

          "I think that's why we're hearing it, to get an education and find out what's going on in the gaming world with this," he said, noting that the proposal likely came from a lobbyist representing a company that would like to sell tickets online.

          Under the pending legislation in Connecticut, a lottery sales agent — someone who is licensed to sell lottery products — would enter into an agreement with a company to sell lottery tickets online. The company would then purchase tickets on behalf of others through the sales agent, and would be tasked with redeeming and distributing winnings.

          Any company selling tickets online would not be able to charge a service fee or accept credit cards. In addition, the company would have to verify that tickets could only be purchased by those in state who are 18 and older. The legislation requires that the company allow the purchaser to view the ticket before a winner is determined.

          The state Department of Consumer Protection issues licenses to lottery vendors in the state, and would also serve as the regulatory body for online lottery sales, according to the legislation. Companies that sell online tickets would need to be licensed through state, just like a vendor at a convenience store. State law allows the DCP to conduct in-depth background checks of lottery vendors, including an analysis of corporate and personal financial assets.

          Connecticut Lottery and DCP officials say they didn't propose the legislation and declined to comment further on what online ticket sales would mean for the state's lottery system, which contributed $319.7 million in revenue to the general fund last year. A majority of those funds, around $54 million, went to the state Department of Education. Other states have pursued an online lottery to boost ticket sales and revenue, but anti-gambling advocates have expressed concern about the accessibility of tickets to those who have gambling problems or are under 18.

          He shares those concerns, Dargan said, but legislators are interested in learning more.

          "A lot of times, we have these public hearings so we're able to let committee members ask questions you might not think of yourself," he said. "There's a lot of good give and take."

          If they go to the on line ticket purchase let say it a major game. You want to select your own numbers  you want them in for 16 draws! You also want 1 quick pick for 16 draws. You , are the owner of these ticket. You get to see the numbers only one time. My question is this are they going to allow the person that buys the ticket to run off a copy on their ticket on their printers at home? We all know that when it get really crowded on the web-site when a jackpot is high causing a lot of web- sites crashing. Satellites go with the weather, bad weather snow , rain etc... if they lost these data what insure the players that had the numbers they will be paid?