Stunned Delaware workers to claim $214 million Powerball jackpot

Oct 13, 2004, 8:57 am (22 comments)

Powerball

A Delaware lawyer representing a group of employees at a Delaware printing firm says the group is stepping forward to claim a $214 million Powerball jackpot.

Attorney George B. Smith says the winners are 33 employees at Sussex Printing Corporation who took part in an office pool.  Smith says they chose the cash option of almost $117 million, rather than annuity payments stretching over 29 years.

He says after taxes, each of the workers will receive about $2.2 million.  Smith describes the workers as "still stunned."

Officials say the jackpot is the sixth-largest Powerball jackpot and the tenth-largest lottery jackpot ever.

The group is from the Sussex Printing Corporation in Seaford which puts out weekly classified publication The Guide.  The winning Powerball ticket was sold by an Uncle Willie's convenience store in Blades, Delaware Lottery director Wayne Lemons announced Tuesday morning.

The name of the individual (or group) that purchased the winning ticket is still not public yet and according to Lemons, nobody has forth yet to validate the ticket yet.

"We cannot predict when that will be, but the ticket is out there somewhere, and we're very anxious to meet the winner when they come in," Lemons said. 

Lemons said the winner of the winning ticket has up to a year to have the Powerball ticket validated, and 60 days after that to decide between a 29-year, 30-payment annuity and cash option worth $116.9 million before taxes.

Even when the winner comes forth to validate the ticket, Delaware law allows the winner of the lottery to remain anonymous if he or she wishes.

The $214.7 million jackpot is the sixth largest Powerball jackpot ever, the 10th-largest lottery jackpot of all-time, and the fifth largest ever won by a single ticket.

More than 68 million tickets for the jackpot were purchased between Thursday and Saturday night. The numbers drawn were: 1, 3, 10, 47, 48 and the Powerball was 27.  The Power Play multiplier was 3.

The Uncle Willie's has been presented with a $10,000 check for selling the winning ticket.  The store's manager Michelle Lewis said she is happy the winners are from the area.  She also said having this money is good, but has some advice for the big winners.

"I wish them a whole lot of luck," she said. "Spend it wisely."

Lewis said people keep calling and business is up.  She said some customers are hoping this is a lucky store.

Lottery Post Staff

Comments

r_billerey

every big jackpot should be played like this  a bunch of guys together, the problem I have not so much friends

fja's avatarfja

I hope the manager was in on it too....or else he might become pretty lonely and in dire need of some help!!!!

four4me's avatarfour4me

to many people in that pool by the time taxes and all the legal stuff is out of the way they will be lucky to have 1.5 mil left per person.

golotto

Delaware anonymity option is the right way for a lottery to offer a jackpot. Let the recipient decide! ahh...the joys of anonymity. I surely wish more states allowed it.

doubledee32

Can someome answer me this?-If you won and hired a lawyer do you just give him the ticket or how would you collect thru a law firm and still be kept secret from the press?

fja's avatarfja

you go to a law firm and set up a blind trust.  The lawyer then picks up the winnings on behalf of the trust.....the only ones that would know you won would be the lawyers and the government......(this is the short version of the explanation) for a larger version you might want to use the search icon at the top of the page...

twisted's avatartwisted
Quote: Originally posted by four4me on October 13, 2004


to many people in that pool by the time taxes and all the legal stuff is out of the way they will be lucky to have 1.5 mil left per person.


Delaware has no state tax on lottery winnings.  So the winners would be left with approximately $2.2 million each after taxes.
CASH Only

No state tax on lottery winnings-another reason to choose CASH.

JAP69's avatarJAP69

 

Lets see if any of the other employees sue on the grounds they were a member of the pool but did not put money in the pot for that drawing.

Todd's avatarTodd

Good point John.  I'll ke

markp1950
I wonder, for how many winners, do they really succeed at hiding...



Mr Winner has been at work for so may years, suddenly he quits...



Or suddenly mr Neighbor is at home all the time now and sells his junker and buys a new mercedes...



While I wouldn't advertise myself, I wouldn't fool myself that I could really hide...



Perhaps I could stay on the move...

Or where I would I really like to go to... A nice remote ranch in Wyoming...



MarkP



Quote: Originally posted by fja on October 13, 2004

you go to a law firm and set up a blind trust. The lawyer then picks up the winnings on behalf of the trust.....the only ones that would know you won would be the lawyers and the government......(this is the short version of the explanation) for a larger version you might want to use the search icon at the top of the page...






Phokas
Quote: Originally posted by fja on October 13, 2004



you go to a law firm and set up a blind trust.  The lawyer then picks up the winnings on behalf of the trust.....the only ones that would know you won would be the lawyers and the government......(this is the short version of the explanation) for a larger version you might want to use the search icon at the top of the page...




Just curious as to who would sign the back of the ticket? The lawyer? The representative of the group? I always hear people should immediately sign their ticket in case it is lost; even before the draw. But if you set up a trust wouldn't your representative have to sign it instead in order to avoid paying any sort of taxes? If so, should it be signed after receiving legal advice?
anon550

I asked the same question (about who can sign the ticket) here:

https://www.lotterypost.com/thread/97495

One poster said a signature won't become public record, but no one has confirmed or clarified this- whether or not you can safely sign the ticket with your personal signature and not risk your name becoming public record.  Anyone know for sure?

tg636

I would guess if you stayed in the same house or town, you couldn't really hide from everyone. I don't think that's the point, though - you really only want to make sure your name isn't on public record so the beggars, weirdos and salesmen can't find you.  If you wanted real anonymity it probably would be best to move to that remote ranch in another state and keep quiet about the source of your wealth.

>I wonder, for how many winners, do they really succeed at hiding...

Mr Winner has been at work for so may years, suddenly he quits...

Or suddenly mr Neighbor is at home all the time now and sells his junker and buys a new mercedes...

While I wouldn't advertise myself, I wouldn't fool myself that I could really hide...

Perhaps I could stay on the move...
Or where I would I really like to go to... A nice remote ranch in Wyoming...

MarkP

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