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Setting a trust for anonymity: how does it work?

Topic closed. 33 replies. Last post 10 years ago by rundown99.

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joshuacloak's avatar - Money Swim-uncle-scrooge-mcduck-35997717-677-518.jpg

United States
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February 12, 2006
698 Posts
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Posted: April 15, 2007, 1:25 am - IP Logged

my post is beyond human reasoning and facts of "whatever" others say you can and can't do

. with that said,

 trusts are contacts.

fact is a trust once setup  can own houses, papers, and lottery tickets. and whatever else on earth to own, but a living soul it can't own thats the olny rule am aware of aka slaves LOL"

the lottery would give out a name alright

the NAME OF THE trust and the Personal,human  name would have to be the trustie they give out

, as in all legal power of trust is given to the trustie.

the public now knows who the freaking winner is

however my understanding  you do have to give MUST OF ALL if not ALL  the lottery's  the offical copy of the trust papers,  "the paper that created the trust"

so they would know who the beneficiary is, and any papers the govt has can be  and WELL be open to the public,

Freedom of Information ACT

"aka the the public way of spying on the government via whatever records"

i  give you a clue on how to really keep privte, i just show you in my mind how the public can kiss my ass on finding me with the cash

think of the jackpot money as a cookie'S IN THE COOKIE jar

you dont want your hand seen in the cookie Jar 

so you send a middle man. 

the middle man has to by rules of lottery tell it who he packing the cookies up for.

 

say someone get the record of the fist trust, they look at the name of the  beneficiary

whats this, a other TRUST?is the beneficiary

yup you use 2 middle mans

middle man 1 says am packing it up for middle man #2, and who is #2 packing it up for, HE DONT HAVE TO SAY, HAHAHAHAH 

 

hmm....................

a other Freedom of Information ACT?

OMFG ,the 2nd trust papers are Privte records, not open to the public, 

so in short your left with a name OF 2ND TRUST, and if your sneaky  you get the trustie name  but never the beneficiary or the 2nd trust papers

in short, not eveB the IRS, would know.]

why i say that?

sense all tax's are paid by the frist., the 2nd trust is just the  beneficiary

atfer what the govt steals eeeeeeeer can i say that?

sense i dont remb them paying the lotto ticket's price with me, i will say that!
i play knowing the cash jackpot is alwas 35% less then they show,

so i dont feel robbed if i do win,

 

they have no power whatsoever over the 2nd trust 

its a contract of 2/3 living or more human souls,and the money already been taxed form the first Trust 

so in short no one has the paper"trust aka contract" with your name on it besides you and whoever act as trustie/maker

you get your money, and the govt cant do s**t to find out.

trusts are contracts and the govt cant make laws grovening them

however for the fact monkeys i speak this follOwing info for you.

The United States Supreme Court affirms the right to enter into a contractual relationship (trust):"..the [contract) TRUST relationship is based upon the common law and is not subject to legislative

aka the govt cant boss the trust around

but it has found a way to control , and boss folks around Statutory trusts, there over 70 of them,and the govt has the power to get all such records.\tell them what they can and cant own ,and or do and cant do

, when  creating a trust  remember that since a trust is a contract{private law} which can be freely entered into, there is little or no need for staturory trusts of any kind.

in short, dont listin to the folks here, do your own rights/law studying,  you wont have a public life if your smart

lawyers cant make much money when there no way of conflict sense, no one has the right to know who the beneficiary is. its privte,

 

in short get a good trustie, if your going to be the creater and its beneficiary  with the trustie being  anyone you want, , if you must use a lawyer and you trust him to be the trustie, i wouldnt, so i would use him to help you with the paper work,

THATS a real Lawyer  job

he draws up the paperwork, needed, and helps you and your trustie{could be a close freind , or someone you trust in life} cover there paper tracks, and have no holes in there armour

 

this post was mind for the people wenting to enjoy Privacy, Protection, and an improved tax position"irs hates not knowing who in the end gets the cash, 

they cant go atfer you for gift tax,aka freeing giving your money thats already  been taxed ONCE OVER, again just for giving it to whoever you damn plz,

its a outrage anyone could think like they do and not think themselfs as a theft (also known as stealing) is the illegal taking of another person's property without that person's freely-given consent

 

 

in short ,atfer all your hard work/think of it as a sound and wise investment move doing trusts,

you enjoy your life without worry

also, be a defenceful human even if they break in to your records, you can at last fight back and not be a total pussy

they{govt} hate not knowing were the money at,anyone planing a theff knowing there money to steal   but not WHO AND WERE ITS AT, makes them freaking insane 

 

also dont use banks, the first trust can hand over the money/wire in CASH, 

hi don't look at me with funny eyes,

you wanted privacy, and to win the lotto,

by  wise thinking of trusts, you HIT THE JACKPOT TWICE.  once for the money, 2nd  jackpot is called Privacy and its priceless

    tnlotto1's avatar - logo
    nashville
    United States
    Member #49896
    February 18, 2007
    1181 Posts
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    Posted: April 15, 2007, 1:40 am - IP Logged

    Here is what I know for Michigan residents regarding this subject. This is a response to my email questions on blind trusts for Mi residents. This information was emailed to me from the Michigan Lottery. "The rules of Mega Millions state that any jackpot winner must release - their name and city of orgin . I don't know anything about a blind trust, that would be a question for an attorney. But a  check can only be made out to either a winner or a Lottery Club". If you chose to claim your ticket as a club, only the club name and city will be released. The club must select a representative, who will sign the back of the winning ticket, making it his or her propert, that person must provide their drivers licence and social security card in order to claim the ticket. All other members of the club must provide their name, address, and ss number to the representative so they may fill out a form to show how much money each person receives. " I quess they leave the door open with the comment about seeing an attaorney based on ignorance of the subject, but I have yet to see anybody make it work. It sounds like a club could be the blind trust for Mi. residents. You need at least 2 people and you can then get a ss number for the club. Who could you trust????? At least for Mi. residents it doesn't seem worth the risk to get other people involved to save the notoriety of having your name released. If you think about it after the first few weeks of press must lottery winners fade away from the news. I had one thought of temporally moving to another city just to get a new drivers licences to use as the form of id. That city would be listed not my true place. Does anyone see pitfalls with that scenario?????????? Further tibits of info from Mi. Lottery. Prize check is drawn from Bank One. Google cdars. Using one bank you can deposit up to 30million with FULL FDIC insurance. It's a great place to park you money. Also check tax free, both Fed and State, accounts such as Fidelity for temporally parking places. No one really has to have a lawyer!

    wow i didnt know you could have fdic insurance for up to 30 million on a bank account? i thought it was capped off at 100k. mybest friend is an investment banker and he never told me that maybe he has to sign a document saying that he can only tell customers thatkind of information. i dont know a lawyer or tax attorney i can trust so id rather do it myself without hiring anyone not even a CPA but i know it will be so hard to do alone. the only thing i do know is that first tennessee is the bank that the tennessee lottery uses so i guess i would have to research and find out what their fdic max is if i want to stay with that bank for a faster transaction..Disapprove

      joshuacloak's avatar - Money Swim-uncle-scrooge-mcduck-35997717-677-518.jpg

      United States
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      Posted: April 15, 2007, 1:57 am - IP Logged

      tnlotto, thats a great idea, use the bank of the lottery for the wire the lottery does for ever big powerball/mega win

       

      a bank makes a big deal out of sending that amount of cash to a other bank

       

      i mean, all they then have to do is  say okay, our  customer#1{the lottery account"}wants to wire our other customer#2{you}  millions in cash, sense its all in house,

      they just move the amount over to the 2nd customer

      i mean its all numbers on there comps right, am sure changeing the numbers {amounts of both accounts}

      , it would be a matter of sec's once the lottery gives the command to wire the money right??????????????????

       

      but am sure they{human bankers} love making simply matters into harder then need be matters.

      ingenious! i do that then, thanks for the idea

       also plz dont trust the banks or FULL FDIC insurance.

      its  face for the public

      fact is the bankers lead out  10 times the amount they have in there banks

       

      in short they create money that was never printed out of thin AIR,

      thing is, the people who get the money you loaned forma  bank put there

      money in a bank

      in short 1000 bucks  a bank has can give people with loans"ends result walking out with cash of 10,000

      thing is they never printed the 9000 bucks, and lets not forget, the 9000 can end up in other banks and they then loan that out at a rate of 1 to 10  ,

      createing evne more money never printed, but, the amounts in people bank's all show they have money

       

      in short if everone taken there cash out the banking would be forcd to foreclose. 

      also if yourt anyone but a govt,bank, and you try this, you be called a scamer.  hyporcrites/

      FULL FDIC insurance.  is a joke, dont trust vest amounts of your money in banks, it makes no sense.

        tnlotto1's avatar - logo
        nashville
        United States
        Member #49896
        February 18, 2007
        1181 Posts
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        Posted: April 15, 2007, 3:20 am - IP Logged

        tnlotto, thats a great idea, use the bank of the lottery for the wire the lottery does for ever big powerball/mega win

         

        a bank makes a big deal out of sending that amount of cash to a other bank

         

        i mean, all they then have to do is  say okay, our  customer#1{the lottery account"}wants to wire our other customer#2{you}  millions in cash, sense its all in house,

        they just move the amount over to the 2nd customer

        i mean its all numbers on there comps right, am sure changeing the numbers {amounts of both accounts}

        , it would be a matter of sec's once the lottery gives the command to wire the money right??????????????????

         

        but am sure they{human bankers} love making simply matters into harder then need be matters.

        ingenious! i do that then, thanks for the idea

         also plz dont trust the banks or FULL FDIC insurance.

        its  face for the public

        fact is the bankers lead out  10 times the amount they have in there banks

         

        in short they create money that was never printed out of thin AIR,

        thing is, the people who get the money you loaned forma  bank put there

        money in a bank

        in short 1000 bucks  a bank has can give people with loans"ends result walking out with cash of 10,000

        thing is they never printed the 9000 bucks, and lets not forget, the 9000 can end up in other banks and they then loan that out at a rate of 1 to 10  ,

        createing evne more money never printed, but, the amounts in people bank's all show they have money

         

        in short if everone taken there cash out the banking would be forcd to foreclose. 

        also if yourt anyone but a govt,bank, and you try this, you be called a scamer.  hyporcrites/

        FULL FDIC insurance.  is a joke, dont trust vest amounts of your money in banks, it makes no sense.

        your welcome joshua, i feel like Todd and everybody here wants to provide information to each other so we can have a shot to win and know what to do after we win. i remember someone here informed me that safety deposit boxes may not be insured for the full amount of your lottery ticket so you may want to put it somewhere else just in case so i kept that advice with me because i know a small piece of paper worth millions would be easy to misplace or tear so i want to have the best spot for it while i workout how to claim and when to claim the jackpot...Banana

          savagegoose's avatar - ProfilePho
          adelaide sa
          Australia
          Member #37136
          April 11, 2006
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          Posted: April 15, 2007, 2:09 pm - IP Logged

          we have discissed trusts before on here, blind trusts was what people decided where the go for anonimity

           

          heres a link to past disacussions

          http://www.lotterypost.com/search.asp?q=blind+trust 

          2014 = -1016; 2015= -1409; 2016  = -1171; 2017 = ?  TOT =  -3596

          keno historic = -2291 ; 2015= -603; 2016= -424; 2017 = ? TOT = - 3318

            Avatar
            California
            United States
            Member #46824
            October 1, 2006
            270 Posts
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            Posted: April 15, 2007, 2:24 pm - IP Logged

            wow i didnt know you could have fdic insurance for up to 30 million on a bank account? i thought it was capped off at 100k. mybest friend is an investment banker and he never told me that maybe he has to sign a document saying that he can only tell customers thatkind of information. i dont know a lawyer or tax attorney i can trust so id rather do it myself without hiring anyone not even a CPA but i know it will be so hard to do alone. the only thing i do know is that first tennessee is the bank that the tennessee lottery uses so i guess i would have to research and find out what their fdic max is if i want to stay with that bank for a faster transaction..Disapprove

            tnlotto1...here is information form the CDARS (sounds like the plural of the tree cedar) website. 

            CDARS® is the Certificate of Deposit Account Registry Service®. And it's the most convenient way to enjoy full FDIC insurance on deposits of up to $30 million. With CDARS, you sign one agreement with a participating local bank or other financial institution of your choice, earn one interest rate, and receive one regular statement.

            Basically as you can see CDARS is a financial instrument one can use to extend FDIC insurance above the $100,000 limit of a single bank.  FYI how I heard about this concept was on a thread about cash versus annuity that was on LP last year.  That to me is what one of the many reasons I come to LP.

              OldSchoolPa's avatar - Lottery-057.jpg
              Gurnee, Illinois
              United States
              Member #49731
              February 12, 2007
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              Posted: April 15, 2007, 2:43 pm - IP Logged

              wow i didnt know you could have fdic insurance for up to 30 million on a bank account? i thought it was capped off at 100k. mybest friend is an investment banker and he never told me that maybe he has to sign a document saying that he can only tell customers thatkind of information. i dont know a lawyer or tax attorney i can trust so id rather do it myself without hiring anyone not even a CPA but i know it will be so hard to do alone. the only thing i do know is that first tennessee is the bank that the tennessee lottery uses so i guess i would have to research and find out what their fdic max is if i want to stay with that bank for a faster transaction..Disapprove

               id rather do it myself without hiring anyone not even a CPA

               

              If you happened to take a look at the world's wealthiest people, you will find that none of them are do-it-yourselfers when it comes to the management, direction, and investment of their wealth.  Those who are do-it-yourselfers end up either not becoming wealthy or significantly less so.  All lottery players and winners should take a note from Brad Duke, the Idaho Powerball winner whose goal is to turn his lottery multi-millions into billions...he has a team of advisors which include those on the investment end as well as tax.  When you do business with a fiduciary, and they defraud you, you have legal recourse to recoup any losses.  When you go it alone and lose your money, you have no one to blame or sue except yourself...don't think that would make any difference, now would it?!

              Get MONEY!!! Winning a JACKPOT lottery is all the HOPE and CHANGE I desire!!!  NOW give me MONEY!US Flag

              The guy who won the presidency in 2008 really won the lottery...he is now millions richer, travels in first class style, and even has a staff that would be the envy of the richest Powerball winner (she has a staff of 2). Every night he goes to sleep, he probably plays the close of Dave Chappelle's Show: I'm rich beyatch!

                rundown99's avatar - cigar

                United States
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                August 14, 2002
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                Posted: April 15, 2007, 3:05 pm - IP Logged

                If you want to remain anonymous, go to a state where you can be anonymous.

                 

                California will NOT allow their winners to remain anonymous.  Like most states, California jackpot winners are public information.   If anonymity was allowed in California, half of the jackpot winners would have remained anonymous. 

                 

                Why don't you ever hear many names of Ohio jackpot winners????  Do you want to know why???? MOST of them remained anonymous through a trust, because Ohio ALLOWS jackpot winners to remain anonymous. 

                 

                What about the names of Delaware lottery winners?  Where are their names?  You don't see the names, because Delaware state law ALLOWS jackpot winners to remain anonymous!!!!

                 

                The rule is simple.  If you want to remain anonymous, travel to a state where you can actually be anonymous.

                Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

                If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!

                  justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                  Wandering Aimlessly
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                  Posted: April 15, 2007, 5:02 pm - IP Logged

                  this is a good topic because i was curious about if trusts are insured like bank accounts and if you can set one up online without having to hire a lawyer so todds link answered most of my questions because i know most bank accounts only are insured by FDIC for up to 100K so i know alot of people have to have other places to put large amounts of money like lottery jackpots and make sure they are insured for most of the value just in case there is id theft or some other theft of some of the money...

                  I didn't get onto this topic to give advice, but as I am typing, it probably will sound like it.  The reason I don't want to give advice on Trusts is that I am not an expert on Trusts although I have taken course on them. Also, the first thing I would tell anyone is never plan your financial future by what someone tells you on an internet board. There is no fiduciary relationship here and whoever tells you what to do can be totally wrong without any fear of litigation. 

                  Regarding FDIC insured accounts, annuities, etc., when the time comes to deposit all that money, you won't be standing at the counter at your local bank handing a deposit slip to a teller.  You'll be meeting with one of the managers who can offer many ideas.  BTW, many people are mistaken about what FDIC covers. The $100,000 we always hear about is the maximum insurance applied to personal accounts. But you can get millions insured by the FDIC at one banking institution. In addition to the $100,000 for personal savings, you can be insured up to $250,000 for an IRA.  Then you can increase that total considerably by forming a Trust.  As long as you have qualifying beneficiaries that you state will inherit the deposits should you die. Just keep the Trust "Revocable" so you have complete control over it. Let's say you are married and have 2 children. You and your spouse both state this money will be paid to them at your time of death, so up to $400,000 will be insured for that account. That is separate from the savings and retirement accounts above mentioned.  So that's already over $1 million. 

                  Edit:  Sorry, I should read all the other comments before I respond to a post I see!  Well, since I already spent the time, I won't delete it even if some information has already been posted.

                    Avatar
                    New Member
                    Racine,Wisconsin.
                    United States
                    Member #47605
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                    Posted: April 15, 2007, 5:40 pm - IP Logged

                    I've never done this myself, but my understanding is that you would probably

                    go to a tax attorney and create a revocable blind trust.  If the lottery in your

                    state accepts that, then they would be publishing the name of your trust

                    as a winner instead of your name.  Of course you would forego all the press

                    conference and all that, but I guess it depends on your state if the winner

                    wants to stay anonymous. 

                      JRCa's avatar - george
                      New Member
                      California
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                      Posted: April 16, 2007, 12:44 pm - IP Logged

                      Sorry about the delay in replying... a couple of days ago I had posted a couple of links to some news stories (about what generally happens to large jackpot lottery winners) in my message and my account was suspended on suspicion of spamming... Anyhow, thanks to Todd and his gracefulness, I'm online again... Big Smile

                      Thank you so much, joshuacloack, for taking the time to contribute here your wisdom... it is very much appreciated. The problem with setting two trusts, IMHO, with the second one being a beneficiary to the first one, is that it widens further the circle of trust that becomes necessary... Things become shady, not only from the perspective of the government spying into our affairs... It also widens the risk, in my opinion, of things going wrong - i.e. the event of foul play by one of the trustees... I completely concur with tnlotto1 saying that when a very large amount of money is at hand, there's almost no one you can possibly trust in this world... unfortunately, even when it come down to your closest family and friends. It has been proven before...

                      Now, for those who don't seem to mind having their name disclosed publicly in case of a win: I don't think most of you realize how important it is to try your very best to maintain anonymity after winning a large lottery jackpot. You need to realize that, while most people have respect for wealthy individuals that got that way through work (business people, actors, etc.), almost everybody has none for a wealthy lottery winner (they think you don't really deserve the money you have won) and once the word is out that you are the one, everybody around you will try to get a "free lunch" one way or another, even by means of very nasty ways...

                      I have done a lot of reading on the subject... Take for instance Jack Whittaker, who pocketed $113 millions a few years ago. His name was made available publicly. Since then, he has been mugged, his house has been broken into several times, money was stolen from his car, people have (falsely) accused him and sued him in order to extract money from him, and he has been pestered to exhaustion with requests for money from countless people (including relatives he had never heard of before...) His life has become a living hell since his lottery jackpot win was made public... He has become an alcoholic... a drug user... he has been arrested... and that's because of all the stress involved in having hit the jackpot and the public at large having become aware of it.

                      I had previously attempted to post two links pointing to a couple of eye-opening news stories about Jack Whittaker. However, I was informed I can't do that yet. So I'm attaching one of those stories at the end of this post. You can find many more by googling keywords such as "Jack Whittaker" "lottery" "clown"  - and similarly also for other lottery winners in the public domain.

                      There is something very peculiar about lottery winners whose names are publicized... I have read about several instances of it... it usually goes very bad with them... as in the case of Jack Whittaker.

                      Believe me guys, if you ever hit the jackpot, do the very best you can to prevent as many people as possible to learn about it... And, IMHO, it pays to prepare for it and plan the thing in advance... if you are serious about winning, that is.

                      Now, a clarification. It is obvious that if you hit a large jackpot you want to hire a very good tax attorney and get all the top advice that money can buy. My initial post here did not solicit legal advice about the matter discussed in any way - it would be very foolish to do so. My point was, and is: until it some in our midst get lucky and then have good reason to go through the expense of hiring such professionals... why not sharing here what we more or less know about it, with the caveat that this is absolutely NOT legal advice being dispensed  here, so as to have "a preview of coming attractions?" Again, in my opinion, it really pays big to have an idea, in advance, of what we'll do should we ever find ourselves in that privileged position.

                       

                      The news article about Jack Whittaker:

                      The worlds first glimpse of Jack Whittaker, winner of the richest undivided lottery jackpot in U.S. history, was of a boisterous, happy-go-lucky guy in a big cowboy hat who loved his family, work and God and promised to share his good fortune with the church and the poor.

                      Two years later, the picture the public is seeing now is a mug shot of a haggard, somber Whittaker.

                      Whittaker, 57, has been arrested twice on charges of drunken driving in the past year and has been ordered to go into rehab by Jan. 2 for a 28-day stay. He also faces charges he attacked a bar manager, and is accused in two lawsuits of making trouble at a nightclub and a racetrack.

                      Thats probably the unfortunate situation of maybe having too much money, too much time on his hands, said Steve Zubrzycki, who works for a company that started selling Wheres Jack? T-shirts after authorities issued an arrest warrant for Whittaker earlier this month.

                      Although he was already a wealthy contractor, Whittaker became an instant celebrity on Christmas Day 2002 after winning a $314.9 million Powerball jackpot. He took his winnings in a lump sum of $113 million after taxes, and at a news conference in which he came across as a jolly saint, he promised to donate one-tenth to his church and contribute to other causes.

                      He soon created a charity to help people find jobs, buy food or get an education; he split $7 million among three churches; and he gave money to improve a Little League park and buy playground equipment and coloring books for children.

                      But in August 2003, a briefcase containing $545,000 in cash and cashiers checks was stolen from Whittakers sport utility vehicle while it was parked at a strip club, and police disclosed that Whittaker not only frequented strip clubs but was also a high-stakes gambler which is why he was carrying so much cash.

                      The break-in was the first of several thefts involving Whittakers vehicle, his office and his house in Scott Depot, a booming community of about 8,000 situated between Charleston and Huntington, West Virginias two biggest cities.

                      One of the thefts occurred at his home on the same day an 18-year-old friend of Whittakers granddaughter was found dead there. The death remains under investigation. Whittaker was out of town at the time, but the young mans death made the lottery winner part of yet another front-page story.

                      Last week, Whittaker reported that his 17-year-old granddaughter was missing. The family had not seen or heard from Brandi Lasha Bragg since Dec. 4. Authorities are investigating.

                      In May, two men sued Whittaker, claiming they were injured when they were tossed out of a nightclub at his request. In another lawsuit, three female employees of a racetrack claim Whittaker assaulted them last year.

                      On Monday, Whittaker pleaded no contest to a battery charge and was fined $100 and ordered to begin attending weekly Alcoholics Anonymous meetings within 15 days. He was accused of threatening and assaulting a bar manager in January.

                      As if we needed another hit on our image as a backward, hillbilly state, along comes Jack Whittaker to reinforce the comedy cracks like Jay Leno makes, groused Dewey Large of Princeton. This clown is not capable of handling a $10 bill, much less all those millions. Every time you turn around hes having trouble with the laws of our state. What a waste of all that money.

                      Whittaker has donated more than $20 million to charity since winning the lottery, said his lawyer, Norm Daniels.

                      Today, his charitable foundation is closed, according to a secretary at Whittakers company. The legal troubles have raised questions about whether he will be able to fulfill his many promises to help others.

                      Whittaker declined comment Monday, and his lawyers did not respond to requests for an interview. He told The Associated Press last year that he had been bombarded with requests for help, and the fame was taking a toll on his family.

                      If I had to do it all over, Id be more secluded about it, he said. Id do the same things, but Id be a little more quiet.

                      Lottery winners commonly regret being so public about their windfalls, said Susan Bradley, founder of the Sudden Money Institute in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

                      Youre really in an international spotlight, Bradley said. The expectations of you are just it never ends. Its exaggerated by anyone who feels they are entitled or have an opportunity to grab a piece of it.

                      As for Whittaker, I think its pretty sad, really, said Jerry Medley of Hurricane. It just goes to show money cant always buy happiness. He added: I dont have no bad feelings about the guy. I just hope he gets his life straight. I think he could do some good with the money.

                      Wife Regrets Big Win

                      Whittaker's wife says she regrets his purchase of the $314.9 million ticket that has thrust her family into the public spotlight.

                      "I wish all of this never would have happened," Jewel Whittaker said. "I wish I would have torn the ticket up."

                        justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                        Wandering Aimlessly
                        United States
                        Member #25360
                        November 5, 2005
                        4461 Posts
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                        Posted: April 16, 2007, 1:14 pm - IP Logged

                        JRCa,

                        I know you are a new member, but it might help if you use the SEARCH feature here to save yourself a lot of time.  There have been stories about JW for years on Lottery Post.  In fact, I don't think a week goes by without someone mentioning his name.  Jack was a self-made millionaire before winning PB and was very generous with his money.  He is an alcoholic and sadly made some very foolish choices.

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                          Posted: April 16, 2007, 2:31 pm - IP Logged

                          JRCa,

                          I know you are a new member, but it might help if you use the SEARCH feature here to save yourself a lot of time.  There have been stories about JW for years on Lottery Post.  In fact, I don't think a week goes by without someone mentioning his name.  Jack was a self-made millionaire before winning PB and was very generous with his money.  He is an alcoholic and sadly made some very foolish choices.

                          Right you are JE!

                          JRCa, using the Lottery Post Search page, you can even narrow your search by selecting just "News" and the date range.  (For Jack W. stories you may want to include "All History" for the date range.)

                          You will find dozens/hundreds of references to JW at Lottery Post.

                           

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                            JRCa's avatar - george
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                            Posted: April 16, 2007, 10:41 pm - IP Logged

                            OK, JE and Todd, concerning JW and the use of this forum's search feature...

                            Let me point out, however, that my reference to JW in this thread was intended as evidence, an example among many to substantiate how the issue of anonymity is a very important one when it comes to lottery winners... 

                            If posters here are already well acquainted with JW's sad story... this is good. There are many other instances out there of other lottery winners whose lives similarly turned more or less sour after hitting the jackpot BECAUSE of their identity being revealed and their newly acquired wealth being pubblicized.

                            So, let's not forget that the topic here is not Jack Whittaker, but the very important need for finding a means to achieve anonymity in case of a win. 

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                              Posted: April 17, 2007, 3:20 pm - IP Logged

                              "my reference to JW in this thread was intended as evidence, an example among many to substantiate how the issue of anonymity is a very important one when it comes to lottery winners... "

                              You did read the story you quoted, right?  Jack Whittaker went out and found his own trouble more often than the trouble found him, and almost every time the trouble found him it was because he was waving a giant flag at it. JW is the undisputed poster child for the lottery not making everything rosy, but he's made a considerable effort to not be anonymous.

                              Don't get me wrong. The option of remaining anonymous would be nice, but your actions after being revealed as a jackpot winner are going to be a major factor in how much trouble you attract. Be smart and sensible, and you shouldn't attract an excessive amount of trouble. OTOH, some people are fond of pointing out that we don't even know the names of most past winners, but what's important is how many scammers know your name. I'd much rather have 50,000 random people know I'm a winner than 10 scammers.  As long as I'm sensible, I'd only be a target to the latter.