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Setting a trust for anonymity: how does it work?

Topic closed. 33 replies. Last post 9 years ago by rundown99.

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JRCa's avatar - george
New Member
California
United States
Member #51515
April 12, 2007
6 Posts
Offline
Posted: April 21, 2007, 1:00 pm - IP Logged

KY, yes I did read that story. I also read a lot - believe me, A LOT - similar cautionary stories pointing to the same bottom line... JW is not the only one but just one of the many... It's not about the mistakes JW made, it is about the pitfalls inherent to not claiming your jackpot with absolute anonymity. I realize that by claiming such things here I have been upsetting that artificial sense of security deriving from a not too realistic view that many here want to believe, which is along the lines of what you stated... But reality is reality, and reality tells quite a different story... And it is very wise and it pays off in the end to be attuned with the reality of things, however upsetting it may seem at first.

In one of my previous posts, I remember I had added plenty of references that substantiate what I have been claiming in this thread... As a result, my account was suspended... As a new member I am not allowed to post links here... [Todd, by this time you should know I am NOT a spammer... How about upgrading my account so that I can post useful links in my messages? It would make things much less frustrating for me, and BELIEVE ME, I am NOT a spammer!!!] Patriot

KY, I did a lot of research before starting this thread, and what I've been pointing to is the cold reality of the situation. Those interested in more "proof" do not need to rely on me to provide it. Google is your friend... Beside google, there are countless professional services catering to the new lottery winners, advertised extensively on the net, that will tell you plenty of (actual) stories of large-jackpot lottery winners whose lives have turned into a nightmare once their names were publicly disclosed...

I'll add a few summarized stories at the end of this post. Again, for those who want to become more acquainted with this very important subject, peruse google, search the news, etc.  I would like to point out that I am NOT on a crusade here trying to convince people... I came here and asked a few questions that I think important. Most of those who have replied do not seem to be attuned to certain realities, so I pointed out the facts that came from my research, my intent here being to help others with what I have learned... I've given it a certain amount of time and effort, and more than this I cannot do... For those willing to listen to the warning and do some research on their own, the rest is up to you.

Hope it helps...

 ________________

"I won the American dream but I lost it, too. It was a very hard fall. It's called rock bottom," says Adams.

"Everybody wanted my money. Everybody had their hand out. I never learned one simple word in the English language -- 'No.' I wish I had the chance to do it all over again. I'd be much smarter about it now," says Adams.

_________________ 

Living on food stamps

William "Bud" Post won $16.2 million in the Pennsylvania lottery in 1988 but now lives on his Social Security.

"I wish it never happened. It was totally a nightmare," says Post.

A former girlfriend successfully sued him for a share of his winnings. It wasn't his only lawsuit. A brother was arrested for hiring a hit man to kill him, hoping to inherit a share of the winnings. Other siblings pestered him until he agreed to invest in a car business and a restaurant in Sarasota, Fla., -- two ventures that brought no money back and further strained his relationship with his siblings.

________________

 

Donald and Danette Sigmon

In July 2006, North Carolinian Donald Sigmon won $800,000 in the Powerball Lottery. For some, this might be a cause for celebration, but for Sigmon and his wife Danette, their lives have been anything but happy.

The two have been shunned and criticized by the Baptist church of which they are members, as well as been regarded with resentment by their community. When they attempted to tithe 10% of their lottery earnings to their church, it was returned, because the pastor deemed money obtained from a lottery inappropriate to receive.

Donald works for an engineering company, while Danette is a part time bus driver and both have been shamed into feeling disgraced for playing the Powerball Lottery, which neither even remotely thought they would end up winning.

Although the Sigmons do feel glad to have the money for financial reasons, any enjoyment they might have had is non-existent, due to the Christian fellowship and friends they have lost because of their participation in the state lottery.

 

_______________

    hypersoniq's avatar - 8ball
    Pennsylvania
    United States
    Member #1340
    April 6, 2003
    2450 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: April 21, 2007, 5:20 pm - IP Logged

    The bottom line is that you accept the possible risks when you buy the ticket (not if you win). Really,who plays to lose?

    I think it is a risk and not fair to be put on display, and if I ever win here in PA I won't spend a cent of it in this state because they advertised my name when it really wasn't necessary... but I still have my ticket, still hoping to win...

    I would even ask them to wait on the announcement until I actually have access to the money so I can move away right away (out of state for sure). I would sign the ticket and claim it. My wife's name won't even go on it so she won't get harassed, and my first purchase would be a pair of big bore Glocks and a concealed carry permit application, all done before I cash in the ticket.

    it's the nature of the game and the odds that it's a risk playing... it's the fault of most states and the press that it's a risk winning.

    The IRS gets your ssn and the taxes, the state has the validated ticket... from my point of view, I don't care who won if it wasn't me.

    Playing more than one ticket per game is betting against yourself.

      rundown99's avatar - cigar

      United States
      Member #567
      August 14, 2002
      482 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: May 10, 2007, 1:54 pm - IP Logged

      Why not just go to a border state that allows anonymity?  Ohio (with the help of a trust) and Maryland both allow winners to remain anonymous.

      Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

      If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!

        rundown99's avatar - cigar

        United States
        Member #567
        August 14, 2002
        482 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: June 7, 2007, 2:22 pm - IP Logged

        The bottom line is that you accept the possible risks when you buy the ticket (not if you win). Really,who plays to lose?

        I think it is a risk and not fair to be put on display, and if I ever win here in PA I won't spend a cent of it in this state because they advertised my name when it really wasn't necessary... but I still have my ticket, still hoping to win...

        I would even ask them to wait on the announcement until I actually have access to the money so I can move away right away (out of state for sure). I would sign the ticket and claim it. My wife's name won't even go on it so she won't get harassed, and my first purchase would be a pair of big bore Glocks and a concealed carry permit application, all done before I cash in the ticket.

        it's the nature of the game and the odds that it's a risk playing... it's the fault of most states and the press that it's a risk winning.

        The IRS gets your ssn and the taxes, the state has the validated ticket... from my point of view, I don't care who won if it wasn't me.

        If you live in Pennsylvania, why not just go to a border state that allows anonymity?  Ohio (with the help of a trust) and Maryland both allow winners to remain anonymous.

        Smart lottery winners form trust to claim their winnings.  They send an attorney to the lottery headquarters to claim the prize in trust, so that ONLY the name of the trust is revealed.  And they tell NO ONE, especially relatives.

        If you ever win a lottery and you are single, the only person you should ever marry is someone who was truly in love with you BEFORE you won the jackpot!