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Topic closed. 248 replies. Last post 2 years ago by Harve$t Moon.

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sootie1835's avatar - spherewall
New York
United States
Member #108469
March 26, 2011
4011 Posts
Offline
Posted: September 1, 2012, 8:58 pm - IP Logged
Simple Living: Determining Your Priorities   

Even with the economy slowly exiting the spectacular nosedive it took last year, many people find themselves with a renewed interest in living simply. However, what that means for each person depends on their own individual priorities.

Determining what this means for each of us sounds like it should be easy, but instead is something many of us struggle with more than we are at peace about it.

Simplistic it might seem, but the easiest way to figure out your priorities is to make a list, then whittle it down based on how the  different things that are important to you interact.
 
There are some questions you can ask that dig right to the heart of this matter. They aren't always easy, but the answers will be more than satisfying. 
 
What is necessary?   
 
Things that are necessary must be done, plain and simple. It doesn't matter how much we like them — if they're essential, they go on the list.   
 
However, we often tend to think things are essential that aren't. For instance, the amount of money we need can sometimes be drastically reduced if we eliminate things that truly aren't needed.

Sure, we need food, water, and shelter, but do we really need catered lunches, Evian, and more bedrooms than there will ever be people in the house?   
 
Include in your thoughts about necessities things like your individual needs for time and space. Maybe your mental health suffers if you don't meditate every day, or you continually dream of 30 minutes uninterrupted time alone. These are necessities, too, even if you usually ignore them.    Add these items to your list.
 
What do you like?
 
While we certainly can't eliminate everything unpleasant from our list of priorities, we're going to be more likely to focus on things we enjoy doing. It's worthwhile to make a list of these things, even if we find that some of them can't make our ultimate priority list.   
 
Think about how you dream of spending your time — those things you'd love to do that consistently get ignored in favor of other, more urgent happenings. Think also about how you function best, whether it's being alone, finding yourself surrounded by people, or at a purple desk with glow-in-the-dark stars on the walls.   
 
Think also about your if-onlys — that list of things you would do if only you had more time, money, space, energy, whatever.   
 
Add them all to your list.  Set your list aside   
 
Once you have your list, walk away from it for a while. Leave it someplace where you won't see it, where you might even forget it exists. Put a date on the calendar 2-4 weeks out from where you are now, to remind yourself to go back to it.
   
During these weeks away, don't intentionally think about your list, but don't stop yourself from thinking about it and the items on it, either. Note what you think about, but hold the thoughts loosely.   Review your list and make changes.   
 
When the day pops up in your calendar, go back to your list. Read the items on it again, without trying to judge them or put them in order. Cross off anything that no longer seems to fit. Don't judge these choices — often, our priorities are buried so deeply inside us that we can't articulate why something does or does not belong.   
 
Repeat this process of setting your list aside and coming back to it until you feel like the list in front of you is what you need to focus on, regardless of whether or not you like each of the items or think it's actually possible.   
 
Take a deep breath when you get this list, then look at it again. Here, sitting right in front of you, is your own personal guide to simple living. Put your best energy toward these things and you will find your life taking on an easier, more manageable tone, not only psychologically but spiritually, emotionally, physically, and financially as well.

Thanks ~ Sarah Winfrey

 

Method 1:  2-7-6
Method 2:  4-7-8
Method 3:  3-8-2
Method 4:  3-9-9
Method 5:  1-2-2
Method 6:  5-5-3

Thank You Harve$t Moon for your inspiration!

BlessingsBlue Angel

    Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

    United States
    Member #76986
    July 10, 2009
    8034 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: September 20, 2012, 7:57 pm - IP Logged

    21 Ways Rich People Think Differently 

                   
    World's richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to task for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to earn their own fortune. 

    What if she has a point?

    Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.
    It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality. "[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money."
     
    Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.
     
    "The average person has been brainwashed to believe rich people are lucky or dishonest," Siebold writes. That's why there's a certain shame that comes along with "getting rich" in lower-income communities. "The world class knows that while having money doesn't guarantee happiness, it does make your life easier and more enjoyable.
     
    Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.
    The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider. The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes. "If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have.
     
    Average people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action mentality.
     
    "While the masses are waiting to pick the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving problems," Siebold writes. "The hero [middle class people] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse. It's the average person's level of thinking that breeds this approach to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away."
     
    Average people think the road to riches is paved with formal education. Rich people believe in acquiring specific knowledge.
     
    "Many world-class performers have little formal education, and have amassed their wealth through the acquisition and subsequent sale of specific knowledge," he writes. "Meanwhile, the masses are convinced that master's degrees and doctorates are the way to wealth, mostly because they are trapped in the linear line of thought that holds them back from higher levels of consciousness...The wealthy aren't interested in the means, only the end."
     
    Average people long for the good old days. Rich people dream of the future.
     
    "Self-made millionaires get rich because they're willing to bet on themselves and project their dreams, goals and ideas into an unknown future," Siebold writes. "People who believe their best days are behind them rarely get rich, and often struggle with unhappiness and depression."
     
    Average people see money through the eyes of emotion. Rich people think about money logically.
     
    "An ordinarily smart, well-educated and otherwise successful person can be instantly transformed into a fear-based, scarcity driven thinker whose greatest financial aspiration is to retire comfortably," he writes. "The world class sees money for what it is and what it's not, through the eyes of logic. The great ones know money is a critical tool that presents options and opportunities."
     
    Average people earn money doing things they don't love. Rich people follow their passion.
     
    "To the average person, it looks like the rich are working all the time," Siebold says. "But one of the smartest strategies of the world class is doing what they love and finding a way to get paid for it." On the other hand, middle class take jobs they don't enjoy "because they need the money and they've been trained in school and conditioned by society to live in a linear thinking world that equates earning money with physical or mental effort."
     
    Average people set low expectations so they're never disappointed. Rich people are up for the challenge.
     
    "Psychologists and other mental health experts often advise people to set low expectations for their life to ensure they are not disappointed," Siebold writes. "No one would ever strike it rich and live their dreams without huge expectations."
     
    Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.
     
    "That's why people like Donald Trump go from millionaire to nine billion dollars in debt and come back richer than ever," he writes. "While the masses are fixated on the doing and the immediate results of their actions, the great ones are learning and growing from every experience, whether it's a success or a failure, knowing their true reward is becoming a human success machine that eventually produces outstanding results."
     
    Average people believe you need money to make money. Rich people use other people's money.
     
    Linear thought might tell people to make money in order to earn more, but Siebold says the rich aren't afraid to fund their future from other people's pockets. "Rich people know not being solvent enough to personally afford something is not relevant. The real question is, 'Is this worth buying, investing in, or pursuing?'" he writes.
     
    Average people believe the markets are driven by logic and strategy. Rich people know they're driven by emotion and greed.
     
    Investing successfully in the stock market isn't just about a fancy math formula. "The rich know that the primary emotions that drive financial markets are fear and greed, and they factor this into all trades and trends they observe," Siebold writes. "This knowledge of human nature and its overlapping impact on trading give them strategic advantage in building greater wealth through leverage."
     
    Average people live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs.
     
    "Here's how to live below your means and tap into the secret wealthy people have used for centuries: Get rich so you can afford to," he writes. "The rich live below their means, not because they're so savvy, but because they make so much money that they can afford to live like royalty while still having a king's ransom socked away for the future."
     
    Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.
     
    Rich parents teach their kids from an early age about the world of "haves" and "have-nots," Siebold says. Even he admits many people have argued that he's supporting the idea of elitism. He disagrees. "[People] say parents are teaching their kids to look down on the masses because they're poor. This isn't true," he writes. "What they're teaching their kids is to see the world through the eyes of objective reality––the way society really is." If children understand wealth early on, they'll be more likely to strive for it later in life.
     
    Average people let money stress them out. Rich people find peace of mind in wealth.
     
    The reason wealthy people earn more wealth is that they're not afraid to admit that money can solve most problems, Siebold says. "[The middle class] sees money as a never-ending necessary evil that must be endured as part of life. The world class sees money as the great liberator, and with enough of it, they are able to purchase financial peace of mind."
     
    Average people would rather be entertained than educated. Rich people would rather be educated than entertained.
     
    While the rich don't put much stock in furthering wealth through formal education, they appreciate the power of learning long after college is over, Siebold says. "Walk into a wealthy person's home and one of the first things you'll see is an extensive library of books they've used to educate themselves on how to become more successful," he writes. "The middle class reads novels, tabloids and entertainment magazines."
     
    Average people think rich people are snobs. Rich people just want to surround themselves with like-minded people.
     
    The negative money mentality poisoning the middle class is what keeps the rich hanging out with the rich, he says. "[Rich people] can't afford the messages of doom and gloom," he writes. "This is often misinterpreted by the masses as snobbery. Labeling the world class as snobs is another way the middle class finds to feel better bout themselves and their chosen path of mediocrity."
     
    Average people focus on saving. Rich people focus on earning.
     
    Siebold theorizes that the wealthy focus on what they'll gain by taking risks, rather than how to save what they have. "The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities," he writes. "Even in the midst of a cash flow crisis, the rich reject the nickle and dime thinking of the masses. They are the masters of focusing their mental energy where it belongs: on the big money."
     
    Average people play it safe with money. Rich people know when to take risks.
     
    "Leverage is the watchword of the rich," Siebold writes. "Every investor loses money on occasion, but the world class knows no matter what happens, they will aways be able to earn more."
     
    Average people love to be comfortable. Rich people find comfort in uncertainty.
     
    For the most part, it takes guts to take the risks necessary to make it as a millionaire––a challenge most middle class thinkers aren't comfortable living with. "Physical, psychological, and emotional comfort is the primary goal of the middle class mindset," Siebold writes. World class thinkers learn early on that becoming a millionaire isn't easy and the need for comfort can be devastating. They learn to be comfortable while operating in a state of ongoing uncertainty."
     
    Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.
     
    While the middle class squabbles over the virtues of Obamacare and their company's health plan, the super wealthy are enrolled in a super elite "boutique medical care" association, Siebold says. "They pay a substantial yearly membership fee that guarantees them 24-hour access to a private physician who only serves a small group of members," he writes. "Some wealthy neighborhoods have implemented this strategy and even require the physician to live in the neighborhood."
     
    Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.
     
    The idea the wealth must come at the expense of family time is nothing but a "cop-out", Siebold says. "The masses have been brainwashed to believe it's an either/or equation," he writes. "The rich know you can have anything you want if you approach the challenge with a mindset rooted in love and abundance." 
     
    Thanks ~ Mandi Woodruff
    Thanks ~ Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think."

     

    Method 1:  4-4-7
    Method 2:  5-3-5
    Method 3:  2-7-7
    Method 4:  5-9-4
    Method 5:  5-7-3
    Method 6:  3-6-7

     

       

      Avatar
      New Member
      Philadelphia
      United States
      Member #132221
      August 29, 2012
      5 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: September 25, 2012, 11:17 am - IP Logged

      Thank you for this!!! This is great information!!!!

        bahamapapa's avatar - Gustav
        Treasure Cay
        Bahamas
        Member #93535
        July 2, 2010
        1040 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: October 15, 2012, 6:42 pm - IP Logged

        Thank you for this!!! This is great information!!!!

        ........WOW ! yes ,second dhat !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!             WOe!

        Oogle...hmmmmm CANT MISS!!!!

          Avatar
          New Member
          Philadelphia
          United States
          Member #132221
          August 29, 2012
          5 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: October 16, 2012, 5:08 pm - IP Logged

          21 Ways Rich People Think Differently 

                         
          World's richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to task for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to earn their own fortune. 

          What if she has a point?

          Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.
          It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality. "[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money."
           
          Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.
           
          "The average person has been brainwashed to believe rich people are lucky or dishonest," Siebold writes. That's why there's a certain shame that comes along with "getting rich" in lower-income communities. "The world class knows that while having money doesn't guarantee happiness, it does make your life easier and more enjoyable.
           
          Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.
          The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider. The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes. "If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have.
           
          Average people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action mentality.
           
          "While the masses are waiting to pick the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving problems," Siebold writes. "The hero [middle class people] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse. It's the average person's level of thinking that breeds this approach to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away."
           
          Average people think the road to riches is paved with formal education. Rich people believe in acquiring specific knowledge.
           
          "Many world-class performers have little formal education, and have amassed their wealth through the acquisition and subsequent sale of specific knowledge," he writes. "Meanwhile, the masses are convinced that master's degrees and doctorates are the way to wealth, mostly because they are trapped in the linear line of thought that holds them back from higher levels of consciousness...The wealthy aren't interested in the means, only the end."
           
          Average people long for the good old days. Rich people dream of the future.
           
          "Self-made millionaires get rich because they're willing to bet on themselves and project their dreams, goals and ideas into an unknown future," Siebold writes. "People who believe their best days are behind them rarely get rich, and often struggle with unhappiness and depression."
           
          Average people see money through the eyes of emotion. Rich people think about money logically.
           
          "An ordinarily smart, well-educated and otherwise successful person can be instantly transformed into a fear-based, scarcity driven thinker whose greatest financial aspiration is to retire comfortably," he writes. "The world class sees money for what it is and what it's not, through the eyes of logic. The great ones know money is a critical tool that presents options and opportunities."
           
          Average people earn money doing things they don't love. Rich people follow their passion.
           
          "To the average person, it looks like the rich are working all the time," Siebold says. "But one of the smartest strategies of the world class is doing what they love and finding a way to get paid for it." On the other hand, middle class take jobs they don't enjoy "because they need the money and they've been trained in school and conditioned by society to live in a linear thinking world that equates earning money with physical or mental effort."
           
          Average people set low expectations so they're never disappointed. Rich people are up for the challenge.
           
          "Psychologists and other mental health experts often advise people to set low expectations for their life to ensure they are not disappointed," Siebold writes. "No one would ever strike it rich and live their dreams without huge expectations."
           
          Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.
           
          "That's why people like Donald Trump go from millionaire to nine billion dollars in debt and come back richer than ever," he writes. "While the masses are fixated on the doing and the immediate results of their actions, the great ones are learning and growing from every experience, whether it's a success or a failure, knowing their true reward is becoming a human success machine that eventually produces outstanding results."
           
          Average people believe you need money to make money. Rich people use other people's money.
           
          Linear thought might tell people to make money in order to earn more, but Siebold says the rich aren't afraid to fund their future from other people's pockets. "Rich people know not being solvent enough to personally afford something is not relevant. The real question is, 'Is this worth buying, investing in, or pursuing?'" he writes.
           
          Average people believe the markets are driven by logic and strategy. Rich people know they're driven by emotion and greed.
           
          Investing successfully in the stock market isn't just about a fancy math formula. "The rich know that the primary emotions that drive financial markets are fear and greed, and they factor this into all trades and trends they observe," Siebold writes. "This knowledge of human nature and its overlapping impact on trading give them strategic advantage in building greater wealth through leverage."
           
          Average people live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs.
           
          "Here's how to live below your means and tap into the secret wealthy people have used for centuries: Get rich so you can afford to," he writes. "The rich live below their means, not because they're so savvy, but because they make so much money that they can afford to live like royalty while still having a king's ransom socked away for the future."
           
          Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.
           
          Rich parents teach their kids from an early age about the world of "haves" and "have-nots," Siebold says. Even he admits many people have argued that he's supporting the idea of elitism. He disagrees. "[People] say parents are teaching their kids to look down on the masses because they're poor. This isn't true," he writes. "What they're teaching their kids is to see the world through the eyes of objective reality––the way society really is." If children understand wealth early on, they'll be more likely to strive for it later in life.
           
          Average people let money stress them out. Rich people find peace of mind in wealth.
           
          The reason wealthy people earn more wealth is that they're not afraid to admit that money can solve most problems, Siebold says. "[The middle class] sees money as a never-ending necessary evil that must be endured as part of life. The world class sees money as the great liberator, and with enough of it, they are able to purchase financial peace of mind."
           
          Average people would rather be entertained than educated. Rich people would rather be educated than entertained.
           
          While the rich don't put much stock in furthering wealth through formal education, they appreciate the power of learning long after college is over, Siebold says. "Walk into a wealthy person's home and one of the first things you'll see is an extensive library of books they've used to educate themselves on how to become more successful," he writes. "The middle class reads novels, tabloids and entertainment magazines."
           
          Average people think rich people are snobs. Rich people just want to surround themselves with like-minded people.
           
          The negative money mentality poisoning the middle class is what keeps the rich hanging out with the rich, he says. "[Rich people] can't afford the messages of doom and gloom," he writes. "This is often misinterpreted by the masses as snobbery. Labeling the world class as snobs is another way the middle class finds to feel better bout themselves and their chosen path of mediocrity."
           
          Average people focus on saving. Rich people focus on earning.
           
          Siebold theorizes that the wealthy focus on what they'll gain by taking risks, rather than how to save what they have. "The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities," he writes. "Even in the midst of a cash flow crisis, the rich reject the nickle and dime thinking of the masses. They are the masters of focusing their mental energy where it belongs: on the big money."
           
          Average people play it safe with money. Rich people know when to take risks.
           
          "Leverage is the watchword of the rich," Siebold writes. "Every investor loses money on occasion, but the world class knows no matter what happens, they will aways be able to earn more."
           
          Average people love to be comfortable. Rich people find comfort in uncertainty.
           
          For the most part, it takes guts to take the risks necessary to make it as a millionaire––a challenge most middle class thinkers aren't comfortable living with. "Physical, psychological, and emotional comfort is the primary goal of the middle class mindset," Siebold writes. World class thinkers learn early on that becoming a millionaire isn't easy and the need for comfort can be devastating. They learn to be comfortable while operating in a state of ongoing uncertainty."
           
          Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.
           
          While the middle class squabbles over the virtues of Obamacare and their company's health plan, the super wealthy are enrolled in a super elite "boutique medical care" association, Siebold says. "They pay a substantial yearly membership fee that guarantees them 24-hour access to a private physician who only serves a small group of members," he writes. "Some wealthy neighborhoods have implemented this strategy and even require the physician to live in the neighborhood."
           
          Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.
           
          The idea the wealth must come at the expense of family time is nothing but a "cop-out", Siebold says. "The masses have been brainwashed to believe it's an either/or equation," he writes. "The rich know you can have anything you want if you approach the challenge with a mindset rooted in love and abundance." 
           
          Thanks ~ Mandi Woodruff
          Thanks ~ Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think."

           

          Method 1:  4-4-7
          Method 2:  5-3-5
          Method 3:  2-7-7
          Method 4:  5-9-4
          Method 5:  5-7-3
          Method 6:  3-6-7

           

             

          I would love to join your club!!!

            bahamapapa's avatar - Gustav
            Treasure Cay
            Bahamas
            Member #93535
            July 2, 2010
            1040 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: October 16, 2012, 8:41 pm - IP Logged

            I too would love to b
            a member please

            Oogle...hmmmmm CANT MISS!!!!

              Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

              United States
              Member #76986
              July 10, 2009
              8034 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: November 7, 2012, 12:59 pm - IP Logged

              The Top 25 Millionaires & Billionaires That Are Using Their Money To Save The World

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

              When you think of the word “Philanthropist“, people such as Bill & Melinda Gates, Warren Buffett & Oprah Winfrey may come to mind. These are just a few of the many super rich that have devoted their lives to changing the world for the better through the riches and Success they have made over their lives. Read on to see the list of the Top 25 Richest Millionaires & Billionaires giving away their money to make this world a better place. 

               

              #25 Lee and Jane Seidman

              #25 Lee and Jane Seidman

              Amount donated in 2010:  $42  million

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiary:  University Hospitals in  Cleveland

              Background:  Seidman is the retired founder and president of  the Motorcars Group, a Cleveland-based conglomerate of car dealerships. He  pledged in 2010 to  give away 90% of his wealthbefore the end of the  year.

              #24 Larry Ellison

              #24 Larry Ellison

              Amount donated in 2010:  $45.1  million

              Net worth:  $39.5 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Ellison Medical  Foundation

              Background:  Ellison, the founder of Oracle, started his  foundation in 1997 for biomedical research.

              #23 Bennett S. LeBow

              #23 Bennett S. LeBow

              Amount donated in 2010:  $49  million

              Net worth: Not available

              Beneficiary:  Drexel  University

              Background:  LeBow is the chairman and CEO of Borders and  chairman of the Vector Group, a holding company for manufacturers of cigarettes.  He’s a graduate of Drexel and the university’s business school bears his  name.

              #19 (tie) P. Roy and Diana Vagelos

              #19 (tie) P. Roy and Diana Vagelos

              Amount donated in 2010:  $50  million

              Net worth:  $535 million (via the National  Herald)

              Beneficiary:  Columbia University Medical  Center

              Background:  Dr. Vagelos is the former CEO and chairman of  pharmaceutical giant Merck. He’s an alumnus of the medical school associated  with the hospital.

              #19 (tie) Paul Ichiro Terasaki

              #19 (tie) Paul Ichiro Terasaki

              Amount  donated in 2010:  $50 million

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiary:  University of California at  Los Angeles

              Background: Dr. Terasaki is a pioneer  in the field of organ transplant medicine. In 1946 he developed the test  that became the international standard method for tissue typing. He conducted  his research in the university’s  laboratories.

              #19 (tie) Ming Hsieh

              #19 (tie) Ming Hsieh

              Amount donated in  2010:  $50 million

              Net worth:  $1.6 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  University of Southern  California

              Background:  Hsieh founded AMAX Information Technologies, a  computer server and storage systems maker, and Cogent, which develops automated  fingerprint-identification systems. He’s agraduate  of the school, as well as a trustee.

              #19 (tie) Ned Evans

              #19 (tie) Ned Evans

              Amount  donated in 2010: $50 million

              Net worth:  $6.5 billion (via Boston  Magazine)

              Beneficiary:  Yale  University

              Background:  Evans, who passed away last year, was a private  investor and the chairman of publishing company Macmillan from 1979 to 1989. He  was also a well-known horse breeder, as well as an alumnus of  Yale.

              #18 Charles E. Kaufman

              #18 Charles E. Kaufman

              Amount donated in 2010:  $53.3 million (estimated bequest)

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiaries:  The Pittsburgh Foundation and other  charities

              Background:  Kaufman, who passed away last year, was an  investor and the former director of purchasing at pharmaceutical company Merck.  His gift will support research in biology, chemistry, and  physics

              #17 Bill and Karen Ackman

              #17 Bill and Karen Ackman

              Amount  donated in 2010:  $59.3 million

              Net worth:  $700 million (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Pershing Square  Foundation

              Background:  Ackman is the founder of New York-based hedge  fund Pershing Square Capital Management. Along with his wife, he created  the Pershing Square Foundation in 2006 to support education, human rights,  social entrepreneurship, and other causes.

              #16 Pierre and Pam Omidyar

              #16 Pierre and Pam Omidyar

              Amount  donated in 2010: $61.5 million

              Net worth:  $6.2 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiaries:  HopeLab, Humanity United, Omidyar Network,  and the Ulupono Initiative

              Background:  Omidyar is the founder of eBay. His wife is the  chairwoman of HopeLab, a  nonprofit that develops technology to benefit chronically ill  children.

              #15 Henry C. Jr. and Jane Woods

              #15 Henry C. Jr. and Jane Woods

              Amount donated in 2010:$67  million (bequest)

              Net worth: Not available

              Beneficiaries:  Lawrenceville School and North Shore Country  Day School

              Background:  Woods is the heir to the Sahara Coal Company  fortune. The bulk of last year’s donation went to the Lawrenceville School, a  private school in New Jersey from  which he graduated and where he was a longtime teacher and chair of the  English department.

              #14 David and Patricia Atkinson

              #14 David and Patricia Atkinson

              Amount donated in 2010: $80  million

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiary:  Cornell University

              Background:  Atkinson is a former partner of Miller, Anderson & Sherrerd, a money management firm. He now runs Atkinson & Company, a  private investment business he owns with his wife. Their gift went  towards a research center focusing on energy, sustainability and the  environment.

              #13 Juanita Kious Waugh

              #13 Juanita Kious Waugh

              Amount donated in 2010: $83.7 million  (estimated bequest)

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiaries:  The Mayo Clinic Saint  Joseph’s College in Indiana

              Background:  Waugh, who passed away last year, managed her  family’s farms and was the heir to part of their cattle, farming and banking  fortune. She and her parents had  been patients of the Mayo Clinic.

              #12 Terrence and Kim Pegula

              #12 Terrence and Kim Pegula

              Amount donated in 2010: $88  million

              Net worth:  $3.1 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Pennsylvania State  University

              Background:  Pegula founded East Resources, an oil and gas  exploration and development company, which he sold to Royal Dutch Shell in 2010  for $4.7 billion. The donation from Pegula, an alumnus, will go towards the  university’s hockey program.

              #10 (tie) Mark Zuckerberg

              #10 (tie) Mark Zuckerberg

              Amount donated in 2010: $100  million

              Net worth:  $17.5 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Startup:  Education

              Background:  Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, made a huge  donation to his own foundation, which will support programs that benefit the  school system in Newark, N.J. The sum will be paid out over five  years.

              #10 (tie) Marc and Lynne Benioff

              #10 (tie) Marc and Lynne Benioff

              Amount donated in  2010: $100 million

              Net worth:  $1.9 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary: University of California at  San Francisco Children’s Hospital

              Background:  Benioff is the founder of Salesforce.com. His  daughter was born at the hospital, and he is a member of its  board.

              #9 Meyer and Renee Luskin

              #9 Meyer and Renee Luskin

              Amount  donated in 2010: $100.5 million

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiary:  University of California at  Los Angeles

              Background:  Luskin is the chairman of Scope Industries, a  major maker of animal feed. He is a graduate of UCLA and the  couple’s gift will go towards a variety of academic  programs.

              #8 T. Boone Pickens

              #8 T. Boone Pickens

              Amount  donated in 2010: $101 million

              Net worth:  $1.45 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiaries:  Oklahoma State University and other  charities

              Background:  The founder of oil company Mesa Petroleum and  energy investment firm BP Capital, Pickens is a graduate of OSU. His donation  will endow need-based scholarships for  students.

              #7 Frances Lasker Brody

              #7 Frances Lasker Brody

              Amount  donated in 2010: $110 million (estimated bequest)

              Net worth:  Not available

              Beneficiary:The Huntington Library, Art  Collections, and Botanical Gardens

              Background:  Brody, who passed away in 2009, was the heir to  both the fortune of her father, an advertising pioneer, and her husband Sidney  Brody, a real estate magnate. She was a member of the library’s board of  overseers, and her donation was largely funded by the sale of her vast art  collection.

              #6 Leonard Blavatnik

              #6 Leonard Blavatnik

              Amount  donated in 2010: $117.2 million

              Net worth:  $9.5 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary: University of  Oxford

              Background:  Blavatnik is the founder of Access Industries, a  major holding company. He did not attend Oxford, but decided  the university was the right choice after learning that it wanted to create  a school dedicated to “improving government and public-policy practices  globally.”

              #5 Edythe and Eli Broad

              #5 Edythe and Eli Broad

              Amount  donated in 2010: $118.3 million

              Net worth: $6.3 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Broad  Foundations

              Background:  Broad is the founder and chairman of homebuilder  KB Home Corporation and financial services company SunAmerica. The couple’s  foundation supports civic programs, contemporary art museums, education, and  medical and scientific research. Broad  is also funding a new art museum in Los  Angeles.

              #4 Irwin and Joan Jacobs

              #4 Irwin and Joan Jacobs

              Amount donated in 2010:  $119.5 million

              Net worth:  $1.15 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiaries:  University of California at San Diego Health  System, Joan and Irwin Jacobs Fund at the Jewish Community Foundation of San  Diego

              Background:  Jacobs is a co-founder of Qualcomm, the wireless  communications company. The bulk of their donation went to the UCSD health  system, which is building  a new medical center to be named after the  couple.

              #3 T. Denny Sanford

              #3 T. Denny Sanford

              Amount donated in 2010: $162.5  million

              Net worth:  $600 million (via The  Daily)

              Beneficiaries:  Sanford Health Foundation, Sanford-Burnham  Medical Research Institute and the Florida Hospital for  Children

              Background:  The noted philanthropist is chairman of United  National Corporation, a banking business in South Dakota. His most  recent gift to his foundation will establish a national institute for  research and treatment of breast cancer.

              #2 Michael R. Bloomberg

              #2 Michael R. Bloomberg

              Amount  donated in 2010: $279.2 million

              Net worth:  $19.5 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiaries:  Arts, human services, public affairs, and  other groups

              Background:  The founder of Bloomberg LP and Mayor of New  York city gave to 970 different nonprofit groups in 2010. Since 2004, the first  year the Philanthropy list was published,  he has given away well over $100 million  annually.

              #1 George Soros

              #1 George Soros

              Amount donated in 2010: $332  million

              Net worth:  $22 billion (via Forbes)

              Beneficiary:  Open Society  Foundations

              Background:  Soros is a financier and the chair of Soros Fund  Management, which manages hedge funds. He’s also the founder of Open Society  Foundations, which supports human rights organizations and democratic  institutions.

              Thanks ~ Chronicle of Philanthropy

              Method 1:  2-3-3
              Method 2:  8-9-7
              Method 3:  0-8-5
              Method 4:  7-7-8
              Method 5:  3-5-8
              Method 6:  8-5-7

               

                Empress-N's avatar - voodoo
                If That # Looks Good, Play It!!!
                United States
                Member #73903
                April 28, 2009
                1433 Posts
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                Posted: November 11, 2012, 12:43 am - IP Logged

                7 Self-Made Immigrant Millionaires

                 

                Immigrants make up 13% of the U.S. population. They come here in pursuit of the American Dream, an opportunity for a better life in exchange for hard work. For many, their unique skills and fresh perspectives lead them to entrepreneurship.

                That may explain why one small-business owner in six in the U.S. is an immigrant, according to a recent report by the Fiscal Policy Institute's Immigration Research Initiative. Professional and business services, such as waste-disposal services and office administration and cleaning, boast the largest number of immigrant business owners, followed by retail, construction, educational and social services, and leisure and hospitality industries. "Immigrants are such a varied group with people from countries all around the world that have a wide range of skill sets . . . and these [fields] have always been a natural fit" both locally and nationally, says David Dyssegaard Kallick, director of FPI's Immigration Research Initiative.

                The seven entrepreneurs featured here come from diverse backgrounds. They made their millions (and, in one case, billions) in industries ranging from Internet technology to restaurant services. Here are their stories.

                1. Josie Natori
                1
                Courtesy of Josie Natori Age: 64
                Country of origin: Philippines
                Occupation: Founder and CEO, the Natori Company

                Her advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "There is no better place in the world for an immigrant to succeed than in the U.S. Follow your dream and make it happen."

                Moving from the Philippines to Westchester, N.Y., to attend Manhattanville College in 1964 was a complete culture shock for Natori. "The cold winters, the food and the sense of humor were just different. I was very homesick," she told Kiplinger. But it never stopped her.

                After earning an economics degree, she went to work for Bache & Company on Wall Street, moving to Merrill Lynch in 1971. But climbing the corporate ladder wasn't enough. "While I loved the [corporate] culture, I also had a very strong desire to build something myself," she says.

                In 1974, Natori became a U.S. citizen. And after giving birth to a son in 1976, she and her husband Ken brainstormed a variety of ideas for starting her own business -- from opening a car wash to running a McDonald's franchise. It was by chance in 1977, however, that she would become a high-end women’s sleepwear designer after showing a nightgown (made from what was originally a hand-embroidered blouse) to a buyer at Bloomingdale's.

                In the early days, Natori ran her company solo. "It's easy to take for granted the amount of work that goes into [making] the clothes you see in stores," she says. "There are so many elements -- from the design concept to production -- that all need to work in order to make something happen." Today, she has nearly 400 employees. Her husband is chairman, and her son, Kenneth, is vice-president of finance and e-commerce. Her business has expanded to include fragrances, eyewear and home décor. In 2011, Natori teamed up with mass retailer Target for a budget-friendly line of lingerie and loungewear. That same year, her company generated $150 million in retail sales.

                "Some people may see their immigrant status as an obstacle," she says. "I have always viewed it as one of my biggest assets. Natori is unique in the design world, because of its East-meets-West aesthetic. All of that is due to my background and heritage."

                2. Lowell Hawthorne
                2
                Courtesy of Lowell Hawthorne Age: 52
                Country of origin: Jamaica
                Occupation: Founder and CEO, Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery and Grill

                His advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "Anybody can achieve the American dream. You've got to be focused, educated, have discipline, and just go for it."

                Shortly after moving to the Bronx from Jamaica in 1981, Hawthorne, 21, green card in hand, landed a job as an assistant stock handler with the New York Police Department. He earned an associate's degree in accounting from Bronx Community College and was eventually promoted to accountant. But entrepreneurship beckoned.

                Hawthorne had watched his father operate a bakery in his native Jamaica and knew he wanted to work alongside family. So he pitched the idea for Golden Krust, a Caribbean-themed, family-style eatery, to his seven brothers and sisters who had also come to the U.S. At first, they couldn't get a small business loan. "The banks were hesitant to grant loans to new restaurants because of the failure rate -- especially niche restaurants such as ours," Hawthorne recalls. "We also didn't have a lot of personal assets to guarantee the loan." So the siblings took out second mortgages on their homes and borrowed money from family and friends, raising $107,000. In 1989, the first Golden Krust restaurant opened in the Bronx. In 1991, Hawthorne left his job with the NYPD for good. The next year, he became a U.S. citizen.

                There are now more than 100 Golden Krust locations in nine states along the Eastern seaboard. Hawthorne and Golden Krust have been profiled in major publications such as The New York Times, the Washington Post and Black Enterprise magazine. In 2011, the company generated $100 million in revenue. Hawthorne says in addition to opening more franchises, there are plans to expand the company with a line of cooking sauces.

                "Risks not taken are opportunities missed," he says. "You've always got to take calculated risks in entrepreneurship.”

                3. Arnold Schwarzenegger
                3
                AP Age: 65
                Country of origin: Austria
                Occupation: Hollywood actor and former California governor

                His advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: Don't let others' negativity discourage you from achieving your goals.

                "Aw-nold" wasn't always a famous face with a big bank account. He's originally from Thal, Austria, and immigrated to the United States in 1968 at age 21. His meal ticket back then was body-building. Schwarzenegger would eventually become a five-time Mr. Universe and seven-time Mr. Olympia champion, which helped open many doors for him -- especially in Hollywood. From 1969 to 1980, he was cast in a series of small roles in films such as "Hercules in New York" and "Stay Hungry." When he was cast as the title character in the 1982 film "Conan the Barbarian," Schwarzenegger's acting career took off. He became a U.S. citizen in 1983. One year later, he starred in "The Terminator" and has gone on to star in more than 20 films.

                Schwarzenegger's entrepreneurial ventures include the Arnold Sports Festival, which he started in 1989 and is held annually in Columbus, Ohio. It hosts thousands of international health and fitness professionals and has expanded into a three-day expo. He was one of the founding celebrity shareholders in the Planet Hollywood restaurant chain that opened in 1991. Schwarzenegger also owns Oak Productions, Inc., a movie production company, and Fitness Publications, a publishing interest with Simon & Schuster.

                In 2003, he ran for governor of California, and won, ultimately serving two terms. Today, Schwarzenegger is worth an estimated $300 million. His films have grossed $1.6 billion domestically. In October, he published his memoir "Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story."

                Earlier this year, he was profiled in ESPN's "30 for 30" short documentary-film series. During that interview, Schwarzenegger discussed how early in his career, he refused to let naysayers stop him from pursuing his dreams: "I didn't pay any attention to it. . . I did not listen to the 'no' . . . and it worked out. I used that attitude as a blueprint for the rest of my life."

                4. Shama Kabani
                4
                Courtesy of Shama Kabani Age: 27
                Country of origin: India
                Occupation: Founder and CEO, the Marketing Zen Group

                Her advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "If you have an idea, put it out there and then figure out how to improve it. Look beyond the bottom line and toward the bigger impact."

                Kabani came with her family to the United States from India in 1994 at age 9. Kabani's father drove a taxi, and her mother ran a café, which she later turned into a Subway franchise. "I saw them work hard and doubly so because they were in a new country trying to adjust. They worked very long hours, and I was a latchkey kid well into high school," she told Kiplinger. By age 10, Kabani had started her first business selling gift wrapping paper, with her younger sister working as her assistant.

                In 2008, she earned a master's in organizational communications from the University of Texas at Austin, where she wrote her thesis on the impact of Twitter and social media. "When I finished grad school, I knew I wanted a job in social media. I applied to several companies, but no one would hire me." The demand for social media professionals simply there yet. Instead of letting rejection discourage her, Kabani founded the Marketing Zen Group, a full-service online marketing and digital PR firm.

                Today, Kabani's company has gone from being a one-woman show to employing 30, including her husband Arshil, who serves as vice president and legal counsel. In 2011, annual sales reached around $1 million, a figure that is expected to double in 2012. Kabani has been featured in national publications such as Forbes, Bloomberg Business week and Entrepreneur.

                Kabani took her oath to become a naturalized citizen on October 29. "It's been a long process that took three years,” she says. Her husband is a natural-born citizen, so she was able to apply through him. For other aspiring immigrant entrepreneurs, Kabani advises: "Pursue entrepreneurship if you have a passion for something. A lot of people see it as a way to make money -- and it shouldn't always be about that."

                5. Sergey Brin

                5

                AP Age: 39
                Country of origin: Russia
                Occupation: Co-founder and director of special projects, Google

                His advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "Success will come from simplicity."

                During a wave of resurgent anti-Semitism, Brin's family left Moscow for America in 1979 when he was 6 years old. They settled in Adelphi, Md. Brin followed in the footsteps of his father, a mathematician and economist, by earning a B.A. in mathematics and computer science in 1993 at the University of Maryland. From there, it was on to Stanford University where Brin received a masters of science and Ph.D. It was at Stanford that he met Larry Page. The now-legendary duo later came up with the idea for Google, launching the search engine in 1998. When the company went public in 2004 (opening at $85 per share), Brin became a billionaire overnight. His net worth is now $22.5 billion.

                These days, Brin continues to innovate. Google teamed up with fashion designer Diane von Furstenburg during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week earlier this year. The models in her show captured their runway experience wearing Google Glass, technology-driven eyewear that allows users to take pictures and send messages. The product has generated lots of interest in the tech world. In September, his company also announced its newest project, Google for Entrepreneurs. It's aimed at connecting business owners with local programs and online resources to help their companies get off the ground.

                In 2007, Brin was included in a CNN Money feature that asked several prominent entrepreneurs to share how they were able to achieve such success and stay ahead of the curve. He stressed how keeping things simple at Google -- focusing on a few small projects and doing them really well -- has helped the company become a household name: "Technology has this way of becoming overly complex, but simplicity was one of the reasons that people gravitated to Google initially . . . success will come from simplicity."

                6. Carlos Castro
                6
                Carlos Castro with his wife Gladis. (Courtesy of Carlos Castro)Age: 58
                Country of origin: El Salvador
                Occupation: President and CEO, Todos Supermarket

                His advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "Never let discrimination be an excuse for not being successful."

                Castro fled to California from civil war-torn El Salvador in 1980 at age 26, forced to leave his wife and young children behind. "At the time, I worked in the factories. The guerilla unions were taking over the factories and the jobs . . . there were many kidnappings and killings," he told Kiplinger.

                Castro, who entered the U.S. illegally, eventually landed in the Washington, D.C.-area. He worked as a janitor and as a dishwasher and cook at a restaurant before becoming a legal resident in 1986. He started working construction and saved enough money to reunite with his family in D.C. By 1987, he had opened a small construction business of his own.

                In 1988, a family friend suggested that he and his wife Gladis start a Hispanic grocery store. The couple spent the next couple of years trying to learn as much as possible about starting a small business. Once they had enough money, they opened the first Todos Supermarket in Woodbridge, Va., in 1990.

                The first year was rough. Money was tight, and both Carlos and Gladis still had to work other jobs to help make ends meet at home. "My wife was making more cleaning houses than we were at the first store," Castro recalls. He eventually turned things around and opened a second Todos location in Alexandria, Va., in 1998. By 2001, business had grown so much that he had to move the first store from its 5,000-square-foot space to a 15,000-square-foot building. "That's when profits really started to roll in," Castro says. In 2007, he opened another location in Dumfries, Va.

                Todos Supermarkets took in $15.9 million last year and projects sales of about $18 million for 2012. When it comes to starting your own company, there will be plenty of naysayers, Castro says. "That's why it's important to always believe in yourself."

                7. Jose Wilfredo Flores
                7
                Courtesy of Poon Watchara-Amphaiwan Age: 42
                Country of origin: El Salvador
                Occupation: Owner and founder, W Concrete

                His advice to immigrant entrepreneurs: "Do it right and nobody can stop you."

                At the age of 14, Flores made a month-long pilgrimage from El Salvador to Philadelphia to escape the country's brutal civil war. If he had remained in his homeland, he would've had one of two options: Join the guerillas or join the army. "The guerillas would come to our house," Flores told Kiplinger. "We had to hide. You couldn't say no because then they would think you were on the army's side and shoot you. A few hours later, the army guys would come and say, 'We want food. We want to take you.' If you said no, they'd think you were with the guerillas."

                When he arrived in the U.S., he was crammed into a U-Haul truck with other illegal immigrants. The truck was pulled over by police. Most of the van's occupants were detained, but Flores was released because of he was a minor. He made his way to Washington, D.C., where his uncle and 18-year-old brother lived. "I came to America with no shoes, no nothing -- not even a dollar.”

                Upon arriving in D.C., Flores worked part-time cleaning offices while attending Lincoln Middle School. “I didn’t have enough money to buy a French fry,” he says. At 15, he left school to work full-time in construction, using falsified documents that said he was 18. “Fake ID, fake Social Security, everything was fake. Nobody checked,” he says. He later became eligible for a legal work permit (he is now a U.S. citizen). By age 25, he had learned the concrete business and was supervising a crew of 50, earning more than $60,000 a year. Despite having secured himself a good job, Flores dreamed of starting his own business.

                Ten years ago, he used savings and a line of credit to start W Concrete, in Jessup, Md. One of the company’s first jobs was to pour the concrete for the building that replaced Lincoln Middle School. Last year, the business brought in $6.6 million. "Most Salvadorans are humble people who will do whatever it takes to get ahead," says Flores. "In my country, there's no opportunity for poor people. The rich get richer and richer. The poor will always be poor and poor. Here, do it right and nobody can stop you."

                ~Thanks Andrea N. Browne~

                $1 Billion

                Touch The Money For Luck!!!

                 "Claim It! Believe It! Receive It!"

                I am who I am,   Not because of who I am,   But because the Great I AM,   Made me who I am.

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                  Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

                  United States
                  Member #76986
                  July 10, 2009
                  8034 Posts
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                  Posted: December 3, 2012, 8:42 pm - IP Logged

                  The 10 Cheapskate Billionaires Who Live Like Paupers

                   

                  An implicit question for anyone who believes in the American Dream is "What 

                  would I do if you had a billion dollars?"

                  Most of us would buy awesome one-of-a-kind toys and sweet mansions.

                  But some real-life billionaires don't have any fun. There are Scrooges who will 

                  do anything to save a penny. And some like Saint Francis who would rather give it all away.

                   

                   

                              976  697  763  490  698  701 

                   

                   

                  Warren Buffet

                  Warren Buffet

                  Buffett is worth an estimated $47 billion, but he holds to his solid values. 

                  He gives an incredible amount to charitable causes and still lives in the Omaha, Nebraska,

                  home he bought for $31,500 more than 50 years ago. He doesn't own a yacht because, 

                  as he puts it, "Most toys are just a pain in the neck." When he married his second wife,

                  rather than a lavish affair, it was a brief afternoon wedding at his daughter's house in Omaha.

                   

                   

                  Frederik Meijer

                  Frederik Meijer

                  It's not a surprise that despite his $5 billion net worth, the frugal tycoon still stays 

                  in budget motels when he's on the road. Raised during the depression era by a barber father, 

                  Fred has been a penny-pincher all his life. In 1934, along with his father, he launched

                  Meijer Thrifty Acres, one of the first to offer "one-stop shopping." After that, the money never 

                  stopped rolling in but Meijer stayed true to his values, choosing cars with high gas mileage and 

                  wearing inexpensive suits from the racks of his stores.

                   


                  Chuck Feeney

                  Chuck Feeney

                   

                  Another Depression-era veteran with a strict personal motto: "I set out to 

                  work hard, not get rich."  The co-founder of Duty Free Shoppers has donated

                   more than $4 billion to disadvantaged children and public health initiatives, 

                  all while going to great lenths to remain an anonymous donor.  But the 76-year-

                  old  doesn't own a car or a house. When asked why he rides the subway and 

                  gives  away his money, he references the Gaelic proverb: “There are no pockets on 

                  a shroud.”


                   

                  Azim Premji

                  Azim Premji

                   

                  This guy is a far departure from the likes of Fenney and Buffett. "Premji 

                  makes Uncle Scrooge look like Santa Claus," remarks a Bangalore tech 

                  executive. As the owner of the technology-service giant, Wipro, Premji 

                  is worth more than $5 billion. Regardless, he is said to monitor the number 

                  of toilet-paper rolls used in Wipro facilities and demands that employees 

                  switch off the lights when leaving their offices. While he flies economy, 

                  drove an old Ford for years until it fell apart and gave his wife a Fiat and 

                  no chauffeur, Bangaloreans complain that he has a very limited interest 

                  in charity.  After years of pressure, in 2000, he finally gave shares valued 

                  at $45 million to an education-oriented foundation in India.

                   

                   

                  Walter Haefner

                  Walter Haefner

                   

                  The world's oldest billionaire (99 years old) lives in the same six-bedroom 

                  house he bought in 1948. Although he owns a private yacht and plane, he 

                  bought these luxury items to "reward and encourage car salesmen who

                   were doing well," his attorney told Forbes in 2000. Likewise he owns a 

                  famous horse farm, but runs it as a profit-making venture. "It has not always 

                  been exactly a modest life, but Walter is not a big spender compared to 

                  other billionaires," the attorney said.


                  David Tepper

                  David Tepper

                   

                  David Tepper, the hedge fund manager worth around $1.2 billion, lives 

                  in the same New Jersey two-story house be purchased with his wife in 

                  1990. He doesn't own a vacation home and his three kids attend public 

                  school. In 2004, he donated $55 million to Carnegie Mellon's business school.

                   

                   

                  David Cheriton

                  David Cheriton

                   

                  David Cheriton, the Stanford professor who has an estimated net worth

                  of $1.1 billion from Google shares, hates the idea of living like a billionaire. 

                  "I'm actually quite offended by that sort of thing," he says, "these people 

                  who build houses with 13 bathrooms and so on, there's something wrong 

                  with them." Instead, Cheriton cuts his own hair, has lived in the same house 

                  since 1981, and drives a 1986 Volkswagen. In 2005 he donated $25 million

                  to the computer science school at the University of Waterloo.

                   

                  Karl & Theo Albrecht

                  Karl & Theo Albrecht

                   

                  Aldi is to Europe is like Wal-Mart to the US. The brother duo behind the 

                  company,  Theo and Karl Albrecht, together are worth an estimated $50 

                  billion. Raised in a modest way by a shopkeeper mom and a miner father, 

                  they remained true to the vision of frugality that drives both their stores 

                  and their lives.  When Theo was kidnapped for 17 days in 1971, his brother

                  negotiated a bargain ransom  of  $4 million -- which he then wrote off as a 

                  business expense.  Though they live in intense seclusion, Karl's house 

                  has been identified as "one of the least ostentatious in the neighbourhood,

                  a modest A-frame house on four levels with a small terrace and a satellite 

                  dish on the roof," according to  The Irish Times.

                  And he drives a 1980s Volkswagon.

                   

                   

                  Huang Guangyu

                  Huang Guangyu

                   

                  Huang Guangyu, who was China's richest man before getting busted 

                  for insider trading, lived with his wife and two daughters in a small Beijing 

                  apartment. He was compared in a LA Times feature to a frugal accountant, 

                  and said to shun the "golfing craze sweeping China" and have no hobbies. 

                  He learned the pauper mindset while growing up as a poor rice farmer. 

                  But he shuns ostentation for another reason: many in the communist nation 

                  are suspicious of the wealthy and see them as tax evaders and crooks. 

                  Which in the end, is just what Guangyu was.

                   


                  Terry Gou

                  Terry Gou

                   

                  Like some kind of bizarro prenup, Terry Gou pledged to donate 90% 

                  of his wealth to charity before marrying his second wife. It was a beautiful 

                  gesture, which the wife signed "without hesitation. But some in Taipei were 

                  disappointed when the tycoon spent only NT$20 million on the wedding -- 

                  especially when a former girlfriend of Lau got married in the same weekend

                  at a cost of NT$220 million. "Unfortunately, Gou simply comes across as being 

                  a tad cheap," complained an editorial in the Taipei Times.

                   


                  FAKE Frugal Billionaire: Ingvar Kamprad

                  FAKE Frugal Billionaire: Ingvar Kamprad

                   

                  The founder of IKEA has cultivated a frugal persona, which basically 

                  serves as the company mascot. He was celebrated in Forbes for 

                  driving a 1993 Volvo and dining at "lower-tier restaurants." But as most 

                  people know in Sweden, Ingvar splits his time between an 18th century 

                  Swedish mansion, an upscale Swiss villa, and a vineyard in Provence, 

                  and he also drives a Porche.

                   

                  FAKE Frugal Billionaire: John Caudwell

                  FAKE Frugal Billionaire: John Caudwell

                   

                  Forbes called this man a frugal billionaire, praising the 

                  fact that he biked 14 miles to work and cut his own hair.

                  But we're not convinced.

                  Caudwell admitted as much in a recent interview

                  "I became a billionaire in 2006 and I'm surrounded by the trappings. 

                  I have a yacht, a Bentley and a helicopter, but I prefer to enjoy myself 

                  physically. Cycling is my great pleasure. All my friends cycle now. 

                  Every Sunday we ride 40 miles to a local pub." Indeed, he lives in a 16-bedroom 

                  Jacobean mansion and pays top dollar for a sexy nanny who was a Playboy 

                  model. Caudwell's girlfriend is a true billionaire's trophy, the former beauty queen

                  Claire Johnson (pictured). Caudwell is very active in charity. But not a pauper.



                  Thanks ~ Gus Lubin and Antonina Jedrzejczak (2010)

                    Empress-N's avatar - voodoo
                    If That # Looks Good, Play It!!!
                    United States
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                    April 28, 2009
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                    Posted: December 5, 2012, 8:04 pm - IP Logged

                    Report says Nigerian billionaire is richer than Oprah

                    Worlds Richest Women

                    A report says Alakija is $500m richer than Oprah

                     

                    A Nigerian  businesswoman Folorunsho Alakija has kicked media mogul Oprah Winfrey off the number one spot on the table of the ‘Richest Black Women in the World’, this is according to a report published by Ventures Africa, an African business magazine and news services.

                    Forbes tells us Alakija, 61, is worth at least $3.3bn which stands contrary to a recent Forbes Magazine ranking which places her net worth at only $600m.

                    Ventures Africa says Alakija is $500m richer than Oprah, whose wealth was estimated at $2.7b in September.

                    Folorunsho Alakija is the founder and owner of Famfa Oil, a Nigerian oil company which owns a 60 percent working interest in OML 127 that produces about 200,000 barrels a day.

                    Born into a polygamous Nigerian family, she started out her professional career in the mid-70s as a secretary at the now defunct International Merchant Bank of Nigeria, one of the Nigeria’s earliest investment banks.

                    In the early 80s, Alakija quit her job and went on to study ‘Fashion Design’ in England, returning to Nigeria shortly afterwards to start Supreme Stitches, a premium Nigerian fashion label which catered exclusively to upscale clientele. The business thrived, and Alakija quickly made a tidy fortune selling high-end Nigerian clothing to fashionable wives of military bigwigs and society women.

                    In May 1993, Alakija applied for an allocation of an Oil Prospecting License (OPL). The license to explore for oil on a 617,000 acre block – (now referred to as OPL 216) was granted to Alakija’s company, Famfa Limited.

                    ~~ Thanks Osagie Alonge ~~

                     

                    228  793  729  392

                    4550  9146  6929  9625

                    $1 Billion

                    Touch The Money For Luck!!!

                     "Claim It! Believe It! Receive It!"

                    I am who I am,   Not because of who I am,   But because the Great I AM,   Made me who I am.

                    Power Numbers   Where Is The Courtesy ??  Universal Dreams  Empress-N Hot Triads  All States P4 - Triads
                    Lotto Losers Lounge  WV - P3   WV - P4  Harve$t Moon Billionaires Club - Members Only  H$M - Holiday Music TRIADS All States P4  Lottery Bible 


                    __________________________________________________________________

                      Empress-N's avatar - voodoo
                      If That # Looks Good, Play It!!!
                      United States
                      Member #73903
                      April 28, 2009
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                      Posted: December 6, 2012, 11:07 am - IP Logged

                      Why do the rich keep money in foreign accounts?

                      Offshore accounts – legal or illegal?

                      One of the confusing things about offshore investing is that it does often involve breaking the law. For example, strict bank secrecy laws in places like the Cayman Islands and Switzerland allow those with ill-gotten gains to hide their money and thus keep it from being confiscated. Everyone from terrorists to drug smugglers use offshore accounts this way.

                      So it’s tempting to believe that anyone with an offshore account is doing something illegal. After all, if they weren’t, why would they care about secrecy? But sending your money overseas is no more illegal than sending yourself overseas. And there are logical reasons to do it.

                      The mechanics

                      In the past, to open an offshore bank account you would typically either visit the bank in person or use a liaison in the United States. For example, an offshore bank located in Belize or Switzerland works with a law firm in New York. To open an account, you visit the law firm and a lawyer sets up the account on your behalf for a fee.

                      Today, you also have the option of opening an offshore bank account online or over the phone yourself, eliminating the expense of a liaison. However, because of their complexity and depending on what you’re attempting to do, lawyers can still be necessary to set up and manage an account.

                      In some cases, investing offshore includes creating a company and incorporating in the host country. In an article recently published by The New York Times, Adam Davidson chronicled how he could have incorporated and started an offshore bank account in 10 minutes for less than $3,000.

                      The full article is worth reading, but here is a breakdown of what Davidson did. First, he located an offshore bank in Belize that was willing to set up an account through email and over the phone. Then he contacted the bank and got a list of fees, including:

                      • $900 for basic incorporation in Belize
                      • $85 for a corporation seal
                      • $650 to open a bank account in a second country, Singapore
                      • $690 to assign an account manager
                      • Total startup cost – $2,415

                      But cost is related to exactly what you’re doing with an offshore account. Some require a corporation, some might even require you to own a home in the country where the account is located. And some accounts may have steep minimums: from $100,000 to a million or more.

                       

                      The benefits of offshore investing

                      1. Privacy Under U.S. law, it’s fairly easy for the government, or in some cases even private citizens, to gain insight into your financial activities. But some countries have laws preventing banks from giving out any information about account holders. For example, the Switzerland Banking Act of 1934 makes it illegal for bankers to share any information about your bank account, unless you’re suspected of an offense like drug trafficking or money laundering.

                      For example, if you’re a famous corporate raider who wants to take over a company, when you start buying stock, small investors could see what you’re doing – big trades are public record. Other investors could then jump onboard and drive the price of your target company higher. An offshore corporate or trust account could shield your identity.

                      2. Asset protection Since your offshore bank account is protected by privacy laws, that makes it difficult for anyone to find your account or learn how much money you have. That could protect your assets from being seized. For example, if a surgeon is sued for medical malpractice, he might be able to shield assets this way.

                      3. Higher return The average interest rates on savings accounts have plummeted in recent years. For example, as of Sept. 6, the highest rate Bankrate found on savings and MMA accounts was 1.05 percent, with a $25,000 minimum opening deposit. Other countries might offer higher rates.

                      4. Tax Deferral Companies can use offshore accounts to defer their U.S. taxes. For example, if you own a company that does business outside the United States, depositing international profits into a U.S. bank account means paying taxes on them. Put those profits in an offshore account, however, and you won’t have to pay taxes until the money comes back into the country.

                      Bottom line? Offshore accounts can offer advantages for those who can afford them, but the complexity and high cost keep them out of the reach of average people. As Stacy said in the video, they’re another way the rich get richer.

                       

                      280  058  700  948  825  013  466  194  051  737

                      0470  0116  5985  6968  6394  9965  4600  6392  5127  7558

                       

                      $1 Billion

                      Touch The Money For Luck!!!

                       "Claim It! Believe It! Receive It!"

                      I am who I am,   Not because of who I am,   But because the Great I AM,   Made me who I am.

                      Power Numbers   Where Is The Courtesy ??  Universal Dreams  Empress-N Hot Triads  All States P4 - Triads
                      Lotto Losers Lounge  WV - P3   WV - P4  Harve$t Moon Billionaires Club - Members Only  H$M - Holiday Music TRIADS All States P4  Lottery Bible 


                      __________________________________________________________________

                        Harve$t Moon's avatar - 5str

                        United States
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                        July 10, 2009
                        8034 Posts
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                        Posted: December 10, 2012, 7:56 pm - IP Logged

                        Ready to spend your jackpot money? Naughty

                        ~~

                         

                        Is this your chance to pick up a chateau on the cheap?

                        Thanks ~ Christina Passariello 

                        Click the photo to see more images of these (relative) bargains. A tech entrepreneur who's rushing to move to California has listed this 5,382-square-foot restored Provençal farmhouse on about 15 acres. A French tech entrepreneur is selling his home and rushing to move to California … 

                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                        The French are fleeing. A spate of proposed tax hikes is leading hundreds of wealthy French to consider leaving the country and putting their homes on the market, real-estate agents say. The result: the best opportunity in years for foreigners to buy a Parisian pied-à-terre or country château. 

                        The number of high-end homes on the market has increased, with sales due to expatriations skyrocketing this year to several a week from a few a month, says Charles-Marie Jottras, president of leading luxury brokerage Daniel Féau. Fiscal expats account for more than half of the homes Daniel Féau lists between $6.4 million and $19.2 million, compared with about 10% in prior years.

                        Several high-profile businessmen have already packed their bags. Former L'Oréal Chief Executive Lindsay Owen-Jones has taken up residence in Lugano, Switzerland. Belgium now counts Amaury de Sèze, who served as chairman of supermarket giant Carrefour, as a local. Nicolas Chanut, founder of French investment advisory firm Exane, moved to London.

                        Flush French are fleeing the new government's attempts to repair France's public finances by increasing taxes on salaries, capital gains and household wealth. Among the controversial proposals in the 2013 draft budget is a 75% tax rate on salaries higher than $1.3 million, up from less than 50% currently. "Wealthy French are not that masochistic," says Mr. Jottras. The proposed taxes apply only to primary residents of France, however; those who buy a property as a vacation home and spend less than half the year in France will not be affected.

                        And with the economy keeping prices flat—or in some cases down for the first time in nearly five years—the market is looking particularly attractive for foreign buyers. Prices on luxury apartments and houses have fallen about 6% compared with last year, according to Mr. Jottras.

                        In an effort to get out quickly, some sellers are slashing prices. A technology entrepreneur's 5,382-square-foot restored Provençal farmhouse on about 15 acres of land is listed at $3.8 million, a 10% discount to the market value, says Philippe Boulet, who heads the St. Tropez and Provence office for Emile Garcin. The 19th-century home and its pool are surrounded by 100-year-old plane trees. The owner—who wants to remain anonymous—is leaving France because of the expected hike in taxes, and is rushing to move to the $2.6 million house he has bought in California, Mr. Boulet says.

                        The newly available properties of departing expats are scattered around France. A 3,337-square-foot top-floor luxury apartment in Nice boasts an unobstructed view of the Mediterranean for $4.9 million. A roughly 59-acre plot near L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, a Provençal town famous for its antique market, includes three separate farmhouses, enough to accommodate multiple generations. It is listed at $4.1 million.

                        The number of luxury properties for sale could balloon next year, brokers say. That's because France's budget won't be voted on until the end of the year—and many entrepreneurs and executives are waiting on the final tax increases before making the decision to relocate. "There could be a migratory wave in 2013," says Sylvain Boichut, the sales manager for France at luxury brokerage John Taylor.

                        Some aren't waiting for the new tax laws to pass, blaming their departure on what they call the government's antibusiness mentality. "Entrepreneurs have the impression that the country doesn't appreciate them," says Mr. Boichut. One of his clients with dual French and Italian citizenship is giving up his French passport in disgust, he says.

                        The media and political backlash against those who leave has prompted wealthy French to be highly discreet. They point to the vilification of luxury-goods tycoon Bernard Arnault, who has requested Belgian citizenship and rents an apartment in Brussels. Libération, a left-leaning paper, put a picture of him on the cover urging him to leave France. Mr. Arnault remains a French taxpayer and has not sold any of his properties, says his spokesman. "Our clients are scared to show off their sports cars in France," says Mr. Boichut.

                        The vast majority of tax exiles sell their French properties to prove they don't have French residence anymore, according to real-estate agents. Mr. Owen-Jones of L'Oréal, Mr. de Sèze and Mr. Chanut did not respond to requests for comment.

                        Of course, the French have been moving abroad for decades to escape the country's punishing taxes. But the profile of those leaving is changing. In the past, the typical fiscal expat was a golf-playing retired Frenchman, who packed up after the kids left home and 40 years of paying French taxes, brokers say.

                        Today, the new expats are younger and still earning their fortunes, a reflection of the government's shift toward targeting high salaries instead of household wealth, as well as the greater ease of moving across Europe's open borders. Still of parenting age, many are selling family-size apartments that have been recently renovated—the kind of property many overseas buyers often seek, brokers say. For example, Nathalie Garcin, who manages the Emile Garcin agencies in Paris, the Atlantic coast and the Alps, listed the homes of a young couple with two children who recently moved to Brussels. One, a 2,691-square-foot, three-bedroom apartment in Paris's George V neighborhood, overlooking the city's rooftops, is listed for $5.4 million. The couple's weekend home, an 18th-century château with a separate guesthouse and guard's quarters, located an hour from the capital, is listed for $3.2 million.

                        Foreigners now have a new wealth of choice in French property. For more than a decade, buyers from outside France have accounted for most sales over $6.4 million. But the hunt for an apartment in Paris, for instance, can be long because there are so few available.

                        Now, they are pouncing. Last month, Mr. Boichut sold a multimillion-dollar apartment in the tony eighth arrondissement to a Lebanese buyer, who had waited a year and a half to find his Parisian getaway.

                         

                        Method 1:  3-3-4
                        Method 2:  4-3-6
                        Method 3:  5-4-5
                        Method 4:  1-7-4
                        Method 5:  9-0-6
                        Method 6:  5-2-0 

                        Method 1:  9-7-2-9
                        Method 2:  1-0-1-2
                        Method 3:  0-6-2-6
                        Method 4:  4-9-2-3
                        Method 5:  6-4-3-7
                        Method 6:  6-1-9-2

                          Avatar
                          columbus, GA
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                          December 2, 2008
                          2870 Posts
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                          Posted: December 10, 2012, 11:39 pm - IP Logged

                           

                           

                          Sudden Money Syndrome

                           

                          You're suddenly rich? Bummer.

                          Who doesn't dream of landing a windfall someday -- of winning the lottery, inheriting $3 million from a long-lost aunt, finding a suitcase full of unmarked bills on the bus -- or a genie in a bottle? Me, I'm not terribly picky about where the millions come from, because the cash alone will solve all my problems.

                          At least that's the fantasy. The reality of life after a windfall isn't nearly as rosy. In fact, being flooded with a sudden fortune, whether earned or inherited, can be highly stressful and sometimes even traumatizing, say a new breed of financial experts who call themselves "wealth counselors."

                          I know. You look a little dubious. Skeptical, even. And who can blame you (or me) for raising an eyebrow (or snorting) at the idea that an enormous truckload of cash would be hard to handle? Sure, I'd give my left arm for it, and that would be a little painful. Of course. But I'd adapt.

                          But sudden money has a dark side. Most of us idealize what life would be like with Big Money. It's easy to forget that, like any drug, money can have a strangely distorting affect on our lives -- especially when taken in large quantities.

                          A windfall "changes all the parameters of how you live," says Dennis Pearne, Ed.D., author of "The Challenges of Wealth" and a pioneer in this odd little corner of financial management (see link at left under "Related Sites"). "It changes what you can do, what you no longer have to do, where you can live, how much you can travel. So much changes so fast that it can be terribly overwhelming, and some people go into money shock."

                          We should all have such problems

                          I desperately want a taste of that money shock. Which is part of the reason I am ridiculously fascinated by the phenomenon.

                          I mean, observing wealth and those who have it is has always been one of the most compelling spectator sports. Why do the British still keep that stuffy monarchy around -- except to watch them live their impossibly affluent lives? Why are Americans addicted to the most brainless publication on earth, "InStyle"?

                          It's not enough to envy those who are wealthy. We want to press our noses up against their rich-and-famous lifestyles to better tally all the things They Have, and all the things We Don't Have, because we think what They Have is better.

                          In fact, we think we'd just love to be afflicted with Sudden Money Syndrome . . . although Susan Bradley, a financial planner and founder of The Sudden Money Institute in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. would tell you to be careful what you wish for.

                          Bradley focuses on strategies to help people cope with the swirl of confusing emotions and impulses that come with sudden money. In fact, she wrote a book about it, "Sudden Money: Managing a Financial Windfall." But after her book was published in 2000, she says, "I started hearing more about Sudden Loss."

                          Here's what she found: Sudden loss and sudden wealth have quite a bit in common. Bradley found that the techniques she used with clients suffering from sudden wealth were just as useful for those plummeting toward a dot-com bottom. "That's when I realized that it's not about the sudden increase in income, it's about the sudden shift," Bradley said.

                          Abrupt changes, emotional bombshells

                          All this may be more relevant to your own life than you think. PowerBall or no, any of us could experience a sudden financial shift. That's painfully true for the many Americans who have lost their jobs in the past few years.

                          Meanwhile, thousands of workers who were on the verge of retirement saw their retirement money shrivel with the stock market, or simply stop growing. They've had to swerve back into the job market, a very sudden shift in their life plans.

                          On the plus side, some of us may indeed get to experience some sort of windfall in our lifetimes. The Social Welfare Resource Institute at Boston College estimates that as the older generation dies, some $41 trillion will be passed on to following generations.

                          With all those lives in flux, it is emotional bombshells that people are ill-equipped to handle, experts say. If you are going through a sudden financial change, it's critical to navigate through the emotional maze to avoid making unwise decisions and destabilizing your financial situation even further.

                          What? No sympathy?

                          Dennis Pearne tells the story of one client, a software developer, who had a wildly successful IPO and netted about $24 million overnight. Within a matter of months, his life was a mess and he had lost every dime in risky, overseas investments. Was the anxiety of wealth so great he needed to blow it? Did he feel on some level he didn't deserve it?

                          Pearne says that this software developer experienced a number of emotional factors in his life that reached a crescendo -- insecurity, shame, a bit of paranoia -- which is what many people experience after a sudden money shift. As his inner compass went spinning, he made faulty decisions. You might not think that fear and shame and guilt and anger and anxiety would be your first response to a major cash infusion, but it's very common.

                          Another problem: Who can possibly understand your woes? "Isolation can be a big factor," says Thayer Willis, author of the book, "Navigating the Dark Side of Wealth."

                          "People who are dealing with these challenges of wealth know that most people won't sympathize or empathize. Their attitude is: I should have your problems," Willis says.

                          And that's just one way that sudden money, or lack of it, can skew personal relationships. More than Money, a nonprofit based in Arlington, Mass., offers peer counseling for the recently rich that it says is free of "sales, fees, solicitations, scorn or envy."

                          There can be other emotional fallout. If the wealth arrives due to someone's death, recipients can feel tremendous amounts of anger and resentment. "Maybe the money comes from someone you didn't have a good relationship with," Willis adds. "Or maybe the fortune was created in a way the recipient doesn't like or disapproves of. Some people feel, 'I don't want anything to do with this money!' "

                          Then there's the shock factor. "Quite often, families keep trusts and inheritances a secret from their children," Pearne says. "We have clients who arrived at their 21st birthdays and had millions handed to them, and they have no way, emotionally or technically, to cope with it. That is traumatizing."

                           

                          5 strategies for coping with a money shift

                          These practical measures can be helpful whether you've suddenly hit the jackpot or lost it all.

                          1.  Take a timeout. "The first rule is to park the money," says Pearne. Don't do anything with it, and don't make any major decisions about your finances for at least three months, he advises. That allows time to get one's bearings and make plans.

                          2.  Get organized. While it's not a time to make decisions, you need to figure out what the decisions will be, says Susan Bradley, and that requires getting organized. Go through your assets and debts; pay any taxes and high-interest debt. Review your insurance coverage. Think about how you're going to live while you're in this planning stage.

                          3.  Figure out your bottom line. Pearne asks people to research their situation until they know the answers to these five questions:

                          - What is your net worth?

                          - What is your income?

                          - What are your fixed expenses?

                          - What is your tax obligation?

                          - How much is left over?

                          4.  Know your priorities. The money moratorium is an opportunity to engage in what Bradley calls "a touchstone exercise." Basically, you keep asking yourself questions about what you want to do, how you want to live, and what is important to you. Do you want to live in a cabin in Montana? Do you want to pay for all your children's educations? Do you want to engage in more philanthropy? Wait it out, get your bearings, pin down your priorities.

                          5.  Assemble a financial team. When the emotions have subsided and you've given yourself some time to fully grasp your new financial situation, then it's time to enlist the help of an adviser. For the suddenly wealthy, that can mean an accountant, a financial planner, an investment adviser and an estate attorney. "On the soft side," says Pearne, "you may want a counselor or wealth psychologist."

                          Thanks ~  MP Dunleavy

                           

                          Method 1:  7-0-3
                          Method 2:  1-1-2
                          Method 3:  3-5-5
                          Method 4:  6-3-2
                          Method 5:  2-0-3
                          Method 6:  7-7-8

                           

                          Method 1:  9-8-9-0
                          Method 2:  8-9-1-8
                          Method 3:  5-6-3-7
                          Method 4:  9-8-8-3
                          Method 5:  3-2-5-3
                          Method 6:  1-0-4-7

                           

                          .  

                          Yes this is what im talking about $$$ Need some for xmas. Just stopping through to say helloHyper

                          stay blessed

                          dg

                          Sun SmileyGo to the father first. GOD

                            eddessaknight's avatar - nw paladin.jpg
                            LAS VEGAS
                            United States
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                            November 22, 2006
                            4494 Posts
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                            Posted: December 11, 2012, 6:12 pm - IP Logged

                            21 Ways Rich People Think Differently 

                                           
                            World's richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to task for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to earn their own fortune. 

                            What if she has a point?

                            Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.
                            It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality. "[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money."
                             
                            Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.
                             
                            "The average person has been brainwashed to believe rich people are lucky or dishonest," Siebold writes. That's why there's a certain shame that comes along with "getting rich" in lower-income communities. "The world class knows that while having money doesn't guarantee happiness, it does make your life easier and more enjoyable.
                             
                            Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.
                            The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider. The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes. "If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have.
                             
                            Average people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action mentality.
                             
                            "While the masses are waiting to pick the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving problems," Siebold writes. "The hero [middle class people] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse. It's the average person's level of thinking that breeds this approach to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away."
                             
                            Average people think the road to riches is paved with formal education. Rich people believe in acquiring specific knowledge.
                             
                            "Many world-class performers have little formal education, and have amassed their wealth through the acquisition and subsequent sale of specific knowledge," he writes. "Meanwhile, the masses are convinced that master's degrees and doctorates are the way to wealth, mostly because they are trapped in the linear line of thought that holds them back from higher levels of consciousness...The wealthy aren't interested in the means, only the end."
                             
                            Average people long for the good old days. Rich people dream of the future.
                             
                            "Self-made millionaires get rich because they're willing to bet on themselves and project their dreams, goals and ideas into an unknown future," Siebold writes. "People who believe their best days are behind them rarely get rich, and often struggle with unhappiness and depression."
                             
                            Average people see money through the eyes of emotion. Rich people think about money logically.
                             
                            "An ordinarily smart, well-educated and otherwise successful person can be instantly transformed into a fear-based, scarcity driven thinker whose greatest financial aspiration is to retire comfortably," he writes. "The world class sees money for what it is and what it's not, through the eyes of logic. The great ones know money is a critical tool that presents options and opportunities."
                             
                            Average people earn money doing things they don't love. Rich people follow their passion.
                             
                            "To the average person, it looks like the rich are working all the time," Siebold says. "But one of the smartest strategies of the world class is doing what they love and finding a way to get paid for it." On the other hand, middle class take jobs they don't enjoy "because they need the money and they've been trained in school and conditioned by society to live in a linear thinking world that equates earning money with physical or mental effort."
                             
                            Average people set low expectations so they're never disappointed. Rich people are up for the challenge.
                             
                            "Psychologists and other mental health experts often advise people to set low expectations for their life to ensure they are not disappointed," Siebold writes. "No one would ever strike it rich and live their dreams without huge expectations."
                             
                            Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.
                             
                            "That's why people like Donald Trump go from millionaire to nine billion dollars in debt and come back richer than ever," he writes. "While the masses are fixated on the doing and the immediate results of their actions, the great ones are learning and growing from every experience, whether it's a success or a failure, knowing their true reward is becoming a human success machine that eventually produces outstanding results."
                             
                            Average people believe you need money to make money. Rich people use other people's money.
                             
                            Linear thought might tell people to make money in order to earn more, but Siebold says the rich aren't afraid to fund their future from other people's pockets. "Rich people know not being solvent enough to personally afford something is not relevant. The real question is, 'Is this worth buying, investing in, or pursuing?'" he writes.
                             
                            Average people believe the markets are driven by logic and strategy. Rich people know they're driven by emotion and greed.
                             
                            Investing successfully in the stock market isn't just about a fancy math formula. "The rich know that the primary emotions that drive financial markets are fear and greed, and they factor this into all trades and trends they observe," Siebold writes. "This knowledge of human nature and its overlapping impact on trading give them strategic advantage in building greater wealth through leverage."
                             
                            Average people live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs.
                             
                            "Here's how to live below your means and tap into the secret wealthy people have used for centuries: Get rich so you can afford to," he writes. "The rich live below their means, not because they're so savvy, but because they make so much money that they can afford to live like royalty while still having a king's ransom socked away for the future."
                             
                            Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.
                             
                            Rich parents teach their kids from an early age about the world of "haves" and "have-nots," Siebold says. Even he admits many people have argued that he's supporting the idea of elitism. He disagrees. "[People] say parents are teaching their kids to look down on the masses because they're poor. This isn't true," he writes. "What they're teaching their kids is to see the world through the eyes of objective reality––the way society really is." If children understand wealth early on, they'll be more likely to strive for it later in life.
                             
                            Average people let money stress them out. Rich people find peace of mind in wealth.
                             
                            The reason wealthy people earn more wealth is that they're not afraid to admit that money can solve most problems, Siebold says. "[The middle class] sees money as a never-ending necessary evil that must be endured as part of life. The world class sees money as the great liberator, and with enough of it, they are able to purchase financial peace of mind."
                             
                            Average people would rather be entertained than educated. Rich people would rather be educated than entertained.
                             
                            While the rich don't put much stock in furthering wealth through formal education, they appreciate the power of learning long after college is over, Siebold says. "Walk into a wealthy person's home and one of the first things you'll see is an extensive library of books they've used to educate themselves on how to become more successful," he writes. "The middle class reads novels, tabloids and entertainment magazines."
                             
                            Average people think rich people are snobs. Rich people just want to surround themselves with like-minded people.
                             
                            The negative money mentality poisoning the middle class is what keeps the rich hanging out with the rich, he says. "[Rich people] can't afford the messages of doom and gloom," he writes. "This is often misinterpreted by the masses as snobbery. Labeling the world class as snobs is another way the middle class finds to feel better bout themselves and their chosen path of mediocrity."
                             
                            Average people focus on saving. Rich people focus on earning.
                             
                            Siebold theorizes that the wealthy focus on what they'll gain by taking risks, rather than how to save what they have. "The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities," he writes. "Even in the midst of a cash flow crisis, the rich reject the nickle and dime thinking of the masses. They are the masters of focusing their mental energy where it belongs: on the big money."
                             
                            Average people play it safe with money. Rich people know when to take risks.
                             
                            "Leverage is the watchword of the rich," Siebold writes. "Every investor loses money on occasion, but the world class knows no matter what happens, they will aways be able to earn more."
                             
                            Average people love to be comfortable. Rich people find comfort in uncertainty.
                             
                            For the most part, it takes guts to take the risks necessary to make it as a millionaire––a challenge most middle class thinkers aren't comfortable living with. "Physical, psychological, and emotional comfort is the primary goal of the middle class mindset," Siebold writes. World class thinkers learn early on that becoming a millionaire isn't easy and the need for comfort can be devastating. They learn to be comfortable while operating in a state of ongoing uncertainty."
                             
                            Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.
                             
                            While the middle class squabbles over the virtues of Obamacare and their company's health plan, the super wealthy are enrolled in a super elite "boutique medical care" association, Siebold says. "They pay a substantial yearly membership fee that guarantees them 24-hour access to a private physician who only serves a small group of members," he writes. "Some wealthy neighborhoods have implemented this strategy and even require the physician to live in the neighborhood."
                             
                            Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.
                             
                            The idea the wealth must come at the expense of family time is nothing but a "cop-out", Siebold says. "The masses have been brainwashed to believe it's an either/or equation," he writes. "The rich know you can have anything you want if you approach the challenge with a mindset rooted in love and abundance." 
                             
                            Thanks ~ Mandi Woodruff
                            Thanks ~ Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think."

                             

                            Method 1:  4-4-7
                            Method 2:  5-3-5
                            Method 3:  2-7-7
                            Method 4:  5-9-4
                            Method 5:  5-7-3
                            Method 6:  3-6-7

                             

                               

                            Good Show Moon et al-

                            A single candle light for one can become a powerfuil search light Light bulb for  many!!!

                             

                            Regards,

                            EddessaKnight Sun Smiley

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                              LAS VEGAS
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                              November 22, 2006
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                              Posted: December 11, 2012, 6:14 pm - IP Logged

                              Good Show Moon et al-

                              A single candle light for one can become a powerfuil search light Light bulb for  many!!!

                               

                              Regards,

                              EddessaKnight Sun Smiley

                                 
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