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if a lottery official's kid won either the PB/MM jackpot. ..

Topic closed. 20 replies. Last post 3 years ago by noise-gate.

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Kentucky
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Posted: June 6, 2014, 12:44 am - IP Logged

In general, no, retailers are not considered prohibited players like direct lottery employees, vendors and contractors. Although some people think the should be. Wink

Not playing is a condition of employment so they simply tell their family members, "don't play because you can't collect if you win". Lots of people think store owners and clerks should be banned from playing in their stores.

    noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
    Bay Area - California
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    Posted: June 6, 2014, 1:29 am - IP Logged

    Not playing is a condition of employment so they simply tell their family members, "don't play because you can't collect if you win". Lots of people think store owners and clerks should be banned from playing in their stores.

    Despite what the lottery committee may say-I still see a lawsuit in the making here. Why should you have to deny yourself a chance at millions simply because your parent works for the lottery? Its not like the parent is selling secrets of " how to win the lottery". It's laughable.

    I would sure like to know whether the children of lottery committee members are required to sign papers stating that they will not attempt to play any of the games including the jackpots?

      Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
      Los Angeles, California
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      Posted: June 6, 2014, 11:03 am - IP Logged

      Despite what the lottery committee may say-I still see a lawsuit in the making here. Why should you have to deny yourself a chance at millions simply because your parent works for the lottery? Its not like the parent is selling secrets of " how to win the lottery". It's laughable.

      I would sure like to know whether the children of lottery committee members are required to sign papers stating that they will not attempt to play any of the games including the jackpots?

      Sure, people can sue for anything. This is a sue happy country full of ambulance chasers.

      But the rules are the rules. That is SOP for any company with contests or promotions, that employees and their family are excluded.

      To win a lottery prize, you must follow all the rules of the game that determines a winner. But there are many more rules than stated on the website or playslip. The official rules. You may not see them, but they are always in effect. From the CA Lottery official rules:

      Disqualified Persons” means persons/Players prohibited by statute, regulation,
      or contract with the Lottery from purchasing a Lottery Ticket and/or winning a
      Lottery Prize or participating in a Promotion and/or receiving a Promotional
      Award and includes:(1) persons under the age of 18 years; (2) members of the
      Commission; (3) any officer or employee of the Lottery or the Commission; (4)
      any officer or employee of the California State Controller’s Office who is
      designated in writing by the Controller as possibly having access to confidential
      Lottery information, programs, or systems; (5) any Contractor or subcontractor
      prohibited by the terms of a contract with the Lottery from playing Lottery games;
      and (6) any spouse, child, brother, sister, or parent who resides in the same
      household as any person described in numbers (2), (3), (4) or (5) herein.
      Further, prize Claims resulting from winning California Lottery Tickets purchased
      by Disqualified Persons are invalid, regardless of the identity of the Claimant.

      You don't have to sign to acknowledge them, but they are always in effect. Just like other rules or laws, you don't have to sign that you accept a speed limit, but if you break it, you will be charged. If you win and try to claim your prize, they have to validate the ticket and also verify if ALL the rules were followed and the ticket was legally obtained. Payment is not an entitlement.

      So if you want to play the lottery and your parent works for the lottery or one of its partners, you are SOL pal. Sad

        noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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        Posted: June 6, 2014, 1:44 pm - IP Logged

        I understand the rules JD, but some rules don't make it right. This specific rule has no basis in reality. There is no way in hell that being a child or children of a lottery official gives one the inside track to acquiring the  winning lottery ticket. It more like" guilt by association".  But it is a discussion forum, so to each his own.

          mrcraft's avatar - images3lp4 zps7dbb4a10.jpg
          Los Angeles, California
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          Posted: June 6, 2014, 2:00 pm - IP Logged

          I understand the rules JD, but some rules don't make it right. This specific rule has no basis in reality. There is no way in hell that being a child or children of a lottery official gives one the inside track to acquiring the  winning lottery ticket. It more like" guilt by association".  But it is a discussion forum, so to each his own.

          You're right about them not having any advantage in winning unless there's fraud involved.  However, this industry is tied very closely to public perception. You're always going to have people that think the lottery is rigged or biased no matter what they do.  But, if someone related to a lottery executive wins a big prize, and happens more than once, more people may begin to form the opinion that there is some favoritism or advantage gained or is outright fixed, and will stop playing. If enough people stop playing, it will spell the end for the lottery.  So, you are right in a sense, that it is "guilt by association," but that's the way it has to be. A small price to pay for that not occurring.

            noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
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            Posted: June 6, 2014, 4:42 pm - IP Logged

            You're right about them not having any advantage in winning unless there's fraud involved.  However, this industry is tied very closely to public perception. You're always going to have people that think the lottery is rigged or biased no matter what they do.  But, if someone related to a lottery executive wins a big prize, and happens more than once, more people may begin to form the opinion that there is some favoritism or advantage gained or is outright fixed, and will stop playing. If enough people stop playing, it will spell the end for the lottery.  So, you are right in a sense, that it is "guilt by association," but that's the way it has to be. A small price to pay for that not occurring.

            It's just a discussion MrC but there are valid points on both sides of the issue. I just think its silly "unless" as you pointed out- if the kids win more than once,  then its cause for concern. 

            However having said that- l cant imagine the powers that be making a press statement " Folks the reason we don't have more frequent winners is because we barring lottery officials children from participating in the game"..

            Like l said...its silly, but there l said it.