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How is this not a massive fraud by the Florida Lottery?

Topic closed. 38 replies. Last post 2 years ago by datamon414.

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Wyomissing, PA
United States
Member #161050
November 15, 2014
301 Posts
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Posted: March 30, 2015, 1:07 pm - IP Logged

Interesting they changed the page, but didn't post any explanation. The reduced number of prizes could have just been simply a glitch. Or, perhaps, the Florida Lottery frequently quietly reduces ticket quantities / number of prizes, but for whatever reason that one slipped though. There's very little transparency regarding ticket manufacture, distribution, prize allocation, security, etc - a mystery leaving open many avenues of abuse...

Often there's little outside oversight of lotteries. In contrast, casinos in many jurisdictions, such as New Jersey and Nevada, are overseen by a separate commission.

As for the public at-large, many players don't understand the basics of statistics; much folklore. Can't fault the lottery on that. However, player ignorance makes pulling the wool over their eyes easier. Heck, some readers here, even after much explanation, don't fully understand the issue you're pointing out.

It's an uphill climb to get the public interested in putting a spotlight on lotteries. It will likely take some huge scandal to force meaningful reforms and more transparency. If the Florida ticket issue is something you intend to pursue further, reach out to others with similar sentiments and start a non-profit to put some public pressure on lotteries / lobby for legislative changes.

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    New Member
    Florida
    United States
    Member #165004
    March 22, 2015
    25 Posts
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    Posted: March 30, 2015, 1:29 pm - IP Logged

    I am not going to start a non-profit to combat this.  The governor of Florida is a crook who bought his way to the last two elections and since his massive Medicaid/medicare fraud did not result in jail time and the state rewards slimeballs with elections to office, I have no faith that there is a single government entity that will pursue this matter.  Florida is where every sex offender, crook, ex-con and carpetbagger run out of town on a rail somewhere else eventually ends up.  It is the Wild West in terms of professionalism or integrity or the basic operating standards you expect in certain realms if you have ever lived anywhere else.  Anything goes here, the biggest liar wins!  I am, however, surprised  that the press did not pursue it in some fashion.  There is a thing in Florida called the Sunshine statutes, which means that every layer of any government entity is 'discoverable' if someone asks about it.  Meetings, memos, etc. are all supposed to be open to public view.  That, of course, is not the reality, but it is the claim.  Even if you apply for a job with a government agency on any level in the state, all your personal data on the application form is available should someone ask about it.  My emails to the Inspector General should be available should someone ask about it.  The problem goes back to the fact that if the lottery is outed for the big outrageous fraud that it is, there is nothing to fall back on to fund education in this state.  There is no incentive to pursue the case when so much is riding on keeping the lemmings buying the tickets.

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      Wyomissing, PA
      United States
      Member #161050
      November 15, 2014
      301 Posts
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      Posted: March 30, 2015, 2:21 pm - IP Logged

      Politics has been sketchy for long as organized society has existed. Sunshine laws aren't overly effective - never have been. If government wants to hide something they will - local governments can be as bad, if not worse than state and federal in this regard. Special interest groups and lobbyists are often what it takes to have a chance at meaningful reforms. Shame you don't want to take it any further, but I totally understand - takes much time, effort, and money. Maybe someone else will - would love to see Consumer Reports do some articles on lotteries.

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        New Member
        Florida
        United States
        Member #165004
        March 22, 2015
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        Posted: March 30, 2015, 5:03 pm - IP Logged

        An update-- I rec'd an email from this office today:

        General Counsel
        The Florida Legislature's
        Office of Program Policy Analysis and
         Government Accountability
        111 W. Madison St.  Suite 312
        Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1475

        I sent them an email asking for an inquiry the day I originally posted this thread and I also contacted the Inspector General of the Florida Lottery.  This email from the office listed above stated they had forwarded my complaint to the Inspector General and that the IG should be in touch with me directly.  I responded that I had contacted them  and the only response was that my access via Instagram was now blocked on the Florida Lottery website.  The person at the agency above stated she was leaving the office for the rest of today but intended to follow up tommorrow morning and be back in touch with me.  I asked for an outside agency to investigate where the missing 21 million has gone and how/why the lottery pulled 25% of the prizes yet continued to advertise as if they offered the full amount they used to launch the campaign. 

         

        Again, I don't expect much from any outside agency within the state of Florida, but at least it is a fresh set of eyes looking and asking.

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          New Member
          Florida
          United States
          Member #165004
          March 22, 2015
          25 Posts
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          Posted: March 30, 2015, 5:08 pm - IP Logged

          Eh, probably not... after looking at their webpage more closely and seeing this, these agencies are all in bed together:

           

          The Florida Legislature
          OPPAGA script logo
          Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability

          Lottery Transfers Continue to Increase; Options Remain to Enhance Transfers and Improve Efficiency, Report No. 15-03, January 2015
           

          Lottery transfers to the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund increased by $71 million in Fiscal Year 2013-14 to $1.495 billion. To increase sales during 2014, the Lottery continued to launch new products and enhance product distribution.

           

          Several additional game and product distribution options are available to increase transfers to education. However, some of these options could represent expanded gambling.

           

          The Lottery’s operating expense rate continues to meet legislative performance standards and is the third lowest in the nation.

           

          The Lottery could
          • continue its efforts to expand the retailer network;
          • continue its efforts to improve its data analysis and reporting capabilities for identifying and investigating potential ticket theft or brokering by retailers, as well as increase the number of retailer locations with player scanners; and
          • develop a schedule to regularly assess its overall advertising return to the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund.
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            Kentucky
            United States
            Member #32652
            February 14, 2006
            7295 Posts
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            Posted: March 30, 2015, 6:36 pm - IP Logged

            Interesting they changed the page, but didn't post any explanation. The reduced number of prizes could have just been simply a glitch. Or, perhaps, the Florida Lottery frequently quietly reduces ticket quantities / number of prizes, but for whatever reason that one slipped though. There's very little transparency regarding ticket manufacture, distribution, prize allocation, security, etc - a mystery leaving open many avenues of abuse...

            Often there's little outside oversight of lotteries. In contrast, casinos in many jurisdictions, such as New Jersey and Nevada, are overseen by a separate commission.

            As for the public at-large, many players don't understand the basics of statistics; much folklore. Can't fault the lottery on that. However, player ignorance makes pulling the wool over their eyes easier. Heck, some readers here, even after much explanation, don't fully understand the issue you're pointing out.

            It's an uphill climb to get the public interested in putting a spotlight on lotteries. It will likely take some huge scandal to force meaningful reforms and more transparency. If the Florida ticket issue is something you intend to pursue further, reach out to others with similar sentiments and start a non-profit to put some public pressure on lotteries / lobby for legislative changes.

            "As for the public at-large, many players don't understand the basics of statistics; much folklore. Can't fault the lottery on that. However, player ignorance makes pulling the wool over their eyes easier. Heck, some readers here, even after much explanation, don't fully understand the issue you're pointing out."

            There is nothing difficult about reading the Florida scratch-off "remaining prizes" chart and seeing that game #1265 has three remaining $10 million prizes and 40 remaining $1 million prizes. If there is a point to make about fooling the players, it's the 8.1 million to 1 odds against any ticket winning the jackpot prize. Most won't do the math to see there is one $10 million jackpot prize winner for every $202.5 million in ticket sales.

            "It will likely take some huge scandal to force meaningful reforms and more transparency."

            It doesn't get any more transparent than one ticket out of every 8.1 million $25 tickets will be a jackpot prize winner and one out of every 704,347.83 $25 tickets win $1 million. Maybe someone working at the lottery made a mistake when they showed 2 of the three top prizes remained, but it was changed and now shows the same number of prizes as advertised. It's not like the website showed all the top prizes remained when there was none.

            "It's an uphill climb to get the public interested in putting a spotlight on lotteries."

            There is plenty of interest when jackpots are in record territory and probably would be more interest if there was an actual scandal. Do you have an example of one?

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              New Member
              Florida
              United States
              Member #165004
              March 22, 2015
              25 Posts
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              Posted: March 30, 2015, 11:14 pm - IP Logged

              The only reason the lottery page is back to its original claim on the "remaining prizes" page is because I have filed half a dozen complaints with various agencies and those agencies are going back to the lottery to investigate.  It was not a glitch or a typo.  I wonder why you are so eager to assume that everything is above board and people simply have a math impairment.  Yes, people are stupid and don't do the math but that is not the point of my post.  This particular lottery campaign syphoned off a quarter of the prizes after raking in millions upon millions in ticket sales based on its jacked up claims of prizes.  They then quietly removed 21 million worth of those prizes, 25%, by posting it on the 'remaining prizes' section.  They continued to issue press releases indicating an inflated prize pool while quietly adjusting the figures with no announcement whatsoever.

               

              While the 'remaining prizes' pages has been re-adjusted, I doubt those prizes are back in the prize pool.  They are sitting in a building somewhere wrapped in plastic with no plans to distribute.  They only adjusted the information because I shined a flashlight on their seedy little game.  If things were above board, they wouldn't be blocking my Instagram access and deleting my posts or failing to respond to numerous contacts asking them to explain where the money is.

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                Jacksonville, Florida
                United States
                Member #129275
                June 14, 2012
                25 Posts
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                Posted: March 31, 2015, 10:47 am - IP Logged

                It all started when Bush became Governor of Florida. He got rid of Lottery Director, Rebecca Paul. He selected Marsha Mann as Lottery Director under his watch. Marsha Mann did not want the Lottery Bill to pass and voted against it but after being selected as the Director of the Lottery, she changed her tune and stated she loved the Lottery.

                My old man had a saying about Politicians "If they not a CROOK when going in, they are a CROOK when coming out!!!

                  datamon414's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
                  New Member
                  Keene, NH
                  United States
                  Member #117936
                  October 18, 2011
                  18 Posts
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                  Posted: April 12, 2015, 11:55 am - IP Logged

                  Flalotteryscam,
                  A couple of slow re-reads of your post highlighted your concern about that particular scratch game
                  in your state. My favorite guru here, The Most Honorable RJoh, has a point also. Investigations cost
                  money, unless of course, a newspaper has a vested interest in scooping this story. Your observations
                  and concerns might be better directed to your State Attorney General, just saying!
                  We play hard earn money in these games, with a hope of a return on our financial output.
                  You'd probably have the same sentiments regarding 'ethics' if you invested in Wall Street.
                  Your vigilance is commendable.