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Does any one know dimensions of Air Lottery Machine?

Topic closed. 16 replies. Last post 1 year ago by GoogilyMoogily.

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Member #35335
March 16, 2006
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Posted: November 4, 2015, 2:46 pm - IP Logged

"Although government lotteries will invariably make an official statement along the lines of "all efforts are made to ensure the randomness of lottery drawings", their actions speak far

louder than words: practically all of them have multiple machines which draw the winning numbers, and they routinely "swap out" these machines "in an effort to make the drawings

more random". This is important: the effort to "make the drawings more random" explicitly implies that there are varying degrees of randomness (i.e., more random, less random, etc.).

If a machine were to be truly random, as they would have you believe, then they those machines would never need to be swapped with another machine; hence, their lotteries are not

truly random.

4 The theory that differing weights of balls could effect the outcome of the lottery was, ironically, proved by criminals in a successful attempt to alter the results of the Pennsylvania

lottery in 1980: “The cheaters included key employees at a Pittsburgh TV station where drawings for Pennsylvania's Pick 3 game were held. A station art director, according to news

reports from the time, injected a few grams of white latex paint into balls to be sucked into an air-powered machine. The cheaters weighed down all balls except those numbered with

4's and 6's, then bought combinations of those numbers. When 6-6-6 hit, they won $1.8 million.” - The News & Observer, May 28, 2006."

Cited from Satori Publishing.

All engineering blueprint dimensions include tolerances.  It is impossible to build two things exactly the same down to every atom.  Of course there is variance to every component that goes into a lottery machine.  Take a look at tolerance tables, which are easy to find online.  In order to understand this, US dimension and tolerance is different from metric systems such as ISO, DIN, or JIS for example.  I will use a US tolerancing scheme which is unusual to a metric system.  A component may be 1.00 +0.03/-0.06 thick.  This means that any component that is between 1.03 and 0.94 inches thick is good.  With a wide tolerance, the method of manufacturing can be coarse, quick and cheap.  If the tolerance is 1.000 +/- .001, then the method to manufacture is very fine, slow and expensive.  It depends on the design intent of the engineer.  This does not take into account surface finishing and GD&T requirements.

TL;DR Tolerances make everything different.  A barrel of precision ball bearings has no perfectly identical parts.

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    United States
    Member #35335
    March 16, 2006
    116 Posts
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    Posted: November 4, 2015, 3:12 pm - IP Logged

    A few additional thoughts.  I'm certain you need backup machines.  An obvious requirement is to have a machine available at the stated time of the drawing.  Should a machine break down, you need a backup.  Also, I'm going to guess that machines are scrutinized, checked, double checked, triple checked very thoroughly.  Not every machine may be available at draw time.  There is also the fact that some lotteries draw from different cities.  They don't move the machine around to do that.  Any validating or judging organization that approves the lotto draw must be worried that everything is perfect lest they be charged with fraud.

    I wouldn't worry one bit about variances in the machines.  Factually, I would love to see machines in wildly different shapes, or running while on a trampoline with random kids randomly bouncing the machine around for some real randomization.  LOL, it can get a little weird after that.