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High rate of Tenn. Lottery scholarships are lost by bad grades

Tennessee LotteryTennessee Lottery: High rate of Tenn. Lottery scholarships are lost by bad grades

There is a high probability that Tennessee college students with lottery funded scholarships will lose them.

A state report found 64% of students who got the scholarships two years ago failed to qualify to keep them.

In translation, roughly almost two out of every three students' did not make the grade.

Of the money raised by the Tennessee Lottery, 30% goes to college scholarships. Figures, just now coming in for students who received the first bunch of scholarships in 2004, are not good. Only 36% retained the scholarships.

TSU senior Brian Jude doesn't have much sympathy for those losing the scholarships since he wasn't eligible when they first began. He said, "It's free money and I could use it right now.... is it because of study habits, I don't know."

Teachers like TSU sociology Prof Ezell Lundy doesn't want to see standards come down for retaining the scholarships. "We have to work with lottery scholars to adjust...but by no means should we lower the bar," said Lundy.

Professor Lundy wants people to remember the competition for students isn't just among themselves; it's now global with places like China and Africa.

The lottery scholarship report is just starting to circulate among lawmakers. Higher Education officials will likely appear before legislative committees to talk about the retention problem.

A state education official said the number of Tennessee students who don't re-qualify is similar to other states with lottery scholarships.

WKRN

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25 comments. Last comment 10 years ago by tntea.
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United States
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Posted: January 19, 2007, 4:54 pm - IP Logged

Maybe Tenn. should spend some of the lottery money, on actually educating its students.

    cps10's avatar - Lottery-004.jpg
    The Carolinas - Charlotte
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    Posted: January 19, 2007, 8:28 pm - IP Logged

    This I would have to agree with. And NO - don't lower standards...eventually they will find something deserving of the scholarship AND be willing to work for it and make it worth the state's while.

    The North Carolina Education Lottery - so much a joke that here are their mascots:

    Stooges

      Littleoldlady's avatar - basket
      Clarksville
      United States
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      July 15, 2002
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      Posted: January 20, 2007, 9:31 am - IP Logged

      Reading, writing a legible sentence, reading comprehension, work ethic (turning in all work due completed and on time)!, and poor study habits are just a few of the things I recognize now.  High stakes testing is also to blame for some of this..a student can make A's and B's in high school but when they get to college, the workload is more demanding and many students just fall by the wayside because they are not equipped to deal with the type of pressure that college generates.  Sometimes I think that "going to college" is just a buzz word to many of them. It gives them  false bravado and gives their parents something to brag about.    In order for a student to really get the "feel" of college, they should take more AP classes in high school.  These classes ARE more rigorous and give a truer picture of a student's ability. 

      If you know your number is going to hit, have patience and then KILL IT!

      You never know when you will get another hit.

        cps10's avatar - Lottery-004.jpg
        The Carolinas - Charlotte
        United States
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        September 12, 2005
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        Posted: January 20, 2007, 9:52 am - IP Logged

        Reading, writing a legible sentence, reading comprehension, work ethic (turning in all work due completed and on time)!, and poor study habits are just a few of the things I recognize now.  High stakes testing is also to blame for some of this..a student can make A's and B's in high school but when they get to college, the workload is more demanding and many students just fall by the wayside because they are not equipped to deal with the type of pressure that college generates.  Sometimes I think that "going to college" is just a buzz word to many of them. It gives them  false bravado and gives their parents something to brag about.    In order for a student to really get the "feel" of college, they should take more AP classes in high school.  These classes ARE more rigorous and give a truer picture of a student's ability. 

        I Agree!

        A lot of kids are not equipped. I went to the University of North Carolina for college. I was very lucky. It's hard to get into, but somehow I got in. Probably because I went to a private school where I started taking many AP classes. I also was recruited to play baseball, so that certainly didn't hurt. There is no way on earth that I would have gotten in based on today's admissions standards, athlete, AP or not. Anyway, the strange thing was that my first three semesters were a re-hash of my junior and senior years at Charlotte Latin. But all of the students around me were struggling, because they hadn't seen most of what I had seen already. It was really bizarre. I feel fortunate to have taken those AP classes in H.S. So, yes, that would be recommended, and perhaps the scholarship grantors in TN could look for those classes on a potential recipient's record to ensure that the student will succeed? I don't know. That's not fair to others that are deserving, but it certainly helps alleviate the bad grade situation.

        The North Carolina Education Lottery - so much a joke that here are their mascots:

        Stooges

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          United States
          Member #34266
          March 1, 2006
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          Posted: January 20, 2007, 8:22 pm - IP Logged

          I Agree!

          A lot of kids are not equipped. I went to the University of North Carolina for college. I was very lucky. It's hard to get into, but somehow I got in. Probably because I went to a private school where I started taking many AP classes. I also was recruited to play baseball, so that certainly didn't hurt. There is no way on earth that I would have gotten in based on today's admissions standards, athlete, AP or not. Anyway, the strange thing was that my first three semesters were a re-hash of my junior and senior years at Charlotte Latin. But all of the students around me were struggling, because they hadn't seen most of what I had seen already. It was really bizarre. I feel fortunate to have taken those AP classes in H.S. So, yes, that would be recommended, and perhaps the scholarship grantors in TN could look for those classes on a potential recipient's record to ensure that the student will succeed? I don't know. That's not fair to others that are deserving, but it certainly helps alleviate the bad grade situation.

          I think we are missing the point here.  Private school education is the best money can by.   However if millions of dollars are being funneled into the public education section via the lottery and property taxes.    All children should be getting the best education our tax and lottery dollars can provide.  Countries with less money for education, have better educated students.  Our performance standards for students is way to low.    IT  is not the students fault or the parents fault,  kids are failing,   its the educational system, period!

            cps10's avatar - Lottery-004.jpg
            The Carolinas - Charlotte
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            September 12, 2005
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            Posted: January 20, 2007, 9:50 pm - IP Logged

            I think we are missing the point here.  Private school education is the best money can by.   However if millions of dollars are being funneled into the public education section via the lottery and property taxes.    All children should be getting the best education our tax and lottery dollars can provide.  Countries with less money for education, have better educated students.  Our performance standards for students is way to low.    IT  is not the students fault or the parents fault,  kids are failing,   its the educational system, period!

            You are exactly right bambini. Our public schools here in Charlotte are sh*t. Lack of respect, which IS the parents' responsibility, contributes to the teachers not caring, so therefore the education system suffers. Here it is bad all around...

            The North Carolina Education Lottery - so much a joke that here are their mascots:

            Stooges

              SirMetro's avatar - center
              East of Atlanta
              United States
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              Posted: January 21, 2007, 5:23 pm - IP Logged

              Perhaps I am just not reading the following statement as it was intended;

              "IT  is not the students fault or the parents fault, kids are failing, its the educational system, period!"

              Could someone kindly clarify to me how a Teacher is expected to TEACH an unresponsive child that has Parents who fail to take the time and interest in educating their child? Or how is it a Teacher is expected to TEACH a child who actually believes the entire reason of attending school is to make a fashion statement?

              I am a product of public school and I personally think I have done well thanks to the efforts my family put into me in combination with school. And my Daughter has done very well being one of the youngest people in the state of Georgia to pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification on the first testing with a 99% score and she too is a product of public education.

              It’s one thing when you have a teacher who sits in class for no reason other then to draw a monthly paycheck. But to place the responsibility of the child’s education upon others while attempting to deflect the responsibility you have to your child is just plain wrong. If the Teacher isn’t teaching, then my question is, what the devil are you doing sitting there whining about it instead of getting in the face of the School Board to do something about it or getting on the School Board to make those changes.

              The schools don’t get enough money to do what they need. I even remember when the entire Physics class I was in worked from a single book the Physics teacher purchased with her own money. Sorry, but education starts at home and if you do not reinforce good personal discipline at home, how in the world can you expect anyone else to be of any benefit to your child?

              Oh and those whiney kids who lost their scholarship…like I told my Daughter when she first lost her Scholarship, just tough. Perhaps if you weren’t lazy you would have kept it. She has earned it back now and is working to finish her school. Success in life is not “given” to any of us. If you want to succeed, you have to earn it. And if you believe any other way is going to get it, then you’re going to be in for one very big disappointment.

              Sir Metro

                CARBOB's avatar - FL LOTTERY_LOGO.png
                ORLANDO, FLORIDA
                United States
                Member #4924
                June 3, 2004
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                Posted: January 21, 2007, 6:47 pm - IP Logged

                Perhaps I am just not reading the following statement as it was intended;

                "IT  is not the students fault or the parents fault, kids are failing, its the educational system, period!"

                Could someone kindly clarify to me how a Teacher is expected to TEACH an unresponsive child that has Parents who fail to take the time and interest in educating their child? Or how is it a Teacher is expected to TEACH a child who actually believes the entire reason of attending school is to make a fashion statement?

                I am a product of public school and I personally think I have done well thanks to the efforts my family put into me in combination with school. And my Daughter has done very well being one of the youngest people in the state of Georgia to pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification on the first testing with a 99% score and she too is a product of public education.

                It’s one thing when you have a teacher who sits in class for no reason other then to draw a monthly paycheck. But to place the responsibility of the child’s education upon others while attempting to deflect the responsibility you have to your child is just plain wrong. If the Teacher isn’t teaching, then my question is, what the devil are you doing sitting there whining about it instead of getting in the face of the School Board to do something about it or getting on the School Board to make those changes.

                The schools don’t get enough money to do what they need. I even remember when the entire Physics class I was in worked from a single book the Physics teacher purchased with her own money. Sorry, but education starts at home and if you do not reinforce good personal discipline at home, how in the world can you expect anyone else to be of any benefit to your child?

                Oh and those whiney kids who lost their scholarship…like I told my Daughter when she first lost her Scholarship, just tough. Perhaps if you weren’t lazy you would have kept it. She has earned it back now and is working to finish her school. Success in life is not “given” to any of us. If you want to succeed, you have to earn it. And if you believe any other way is going to get it, then you’re going to be in for one very big disappointment.

                Sir Metro

                Amen, Sir Metro! Everyone wants to blame the system, instead of the parents taking the responsibilty for their children's education. Lot of the kids come home from school and the parents never discuss anything about " what happen in school today" or never, ever go to PTA meetings, don't ever pay any attention to the childs report card and God forbid, discussing the childs grades with the teachers. I realise the times have changed since I was in school. But lord, help my ass if I brought home a bad report card. My Mom would have been knocking on every teachers door, until she got some answers. She quit school because they had recess, my Mom didn't play.

                  Avatar

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                  Posted: January 21, 2007, 6:57 pm - IP Logged

                  Perhaps I am just not reading the following statement as it was intended;

                  "IT  is not the students fault or the parents fault, kids are failing, its the educational system, period!"

                  Could someone kindly clarify to me how a Teacher is expected to TEACH an unresponsive child that has Parents who fail to take the time and interest in educating their child? Or how is it a Teacher is expected to TEACH a child who actually believes the entire reason of attending school is to make a fashion statement?

                  I am a product of public school and I personally think I have done well thanks to the efforts my family put into me in combination with school. And my Daughter has done very well being one of the youngest people in the state of Georgia to pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification on the first testing with a 99% score and she too is a product of public education.

                  It’s one thing when you have a teacher who sits in class for no reason other then to draw a monthly paycheck. But to place the responsibility of the child’s education upon others while attempting to deflect the responsibility you have to your child is just plain wrong. If the Teacher isn’t teaching, then my question is, what the devil are you doing sitting there whining about it instead of getting in the face of the School Board to do something about it or getting on the School Board to make those changes.

                  The schools don’t get enough money to do what they need. I even remember when the entire Physics class I was in worked from a single book the Physics teacher purchased with her own money. Sorry, but education starts at home and if you do not reinforce good personal discipline at home, how in the world can you expect anyone else to be of any benefit to your child?

                  Oh and those whiney kids who lost their scholarship…like I told my Daughter when she first lost her Scholarship, just tough. Perhaps if you weren’t lazy you would have kept it. She has earned it back now and is working to finish her school. Success in life is not “given” to any of us. If you want to succeed, you have to earn it. And if you believe any other way is going to get it, then you’re going to be in for one very big disappointment.

                  Sir Metro

                  So what you are saying that 22 grand a year per child (Dept. of Education statistic)  is not enough money.  The majority of american parents don't give a rats ass about their childrens future, and only care about  their kids making a fashion statment.  If that is the case, the U.S. can kiss its future goodbye.  On a personal note my 3 year old, has recently taken his preschool test.  He knew his numbers, the alphabet,  geometric shapes and colors.    The test administrator said he is at third grade level, if that is the standard for third grade we are in trouble.    You cannot have success in life Sir Metro, if your given a third rate education.    Lets face it.    When the majority of high school graduates can't make change something is wrong.

                    Littleoldlady's avatar - basket
                    Clarksville
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                    Posted: January 21, 2007, 7:13 pm - IP Logged

                    I think also that NCLB has done a share of right but it has also some components that make it very skewed.  The graduation rate for a school HAS to improve every year.  How can it improve when you have students who will not do ANY classwork..NO homework...will NOT read ..period.  Every day, I preach to my students about life.  If you have a job, YOU MUST PERFORM..if you can't, no one is going to keep you there.  I really don't think they believe me because they don't change.  Many parents have thrown in the towel..they just don't know what to do with their kids (high school).   They are just praying that they will turn 18 and then it is out of their hands.  The sorry state of affairs to almost too much sometimes.  I have been cursed, hit, reprimanded by the administration for trying to do my job the best of my ability, spent hundreds, perhaps thousands of my own dollars and it seems as if nothing helps.  Each year, the kids get worse.  They have no respect for authority..period!!  However, I keep trying.  I am looking for that 1 student who will listen and try to do their best.  If I can help one student then it is all worth it.  On The Job 9 and 1/2 years.

                    If you know your number is going to hit, have patience and then KILL IT!

                    You never know when you will get another hit.

                      Avatar

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                      Posted: January 21, 2007, 7:43 pm - IP Logged

                      One of the key problems with youth today, is that our society puts actors, singers and sports figures on a higher pedestal than scientists, and academics.   Their are more  TV biographies on Britney Spears, than on Albert Einstein.  I have a 16 year old niece and I have told her numerous times, she should at least learn how to type, file, learn AP systems.  She has no interest in any of it.  She is going to be an actress.  Thats it, she has no back up plan. 

                        justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                        Wandering Aimlessly
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                        Posted: January 23, 2007, 12:11 am - IP Logged

                         "the key problems with youth today"

                        I can't comment about Tennessee, and this article is a wakeup call for their educational system, but I have been hearing about "kids nowadays" for about 50 years (and I'm 55.) 

                        I know just as many parents who have children who are well balanced and get good grades as I do those who have troubled children.  It's the same 'ol, same 'ol...people always talk about the youth of today as if they are worse than the earlier generation.  My parents would talk about "when I was your age" and now we're all getting old and doing the same thing. 

                        My sister has 2 children and both graduated college with the highest honors.  My friend's son goes to our local Community College and works part-time. My next door neighbors moved here from Mexico only a few years ago and their children are polite and do well in school. Many stores I go into employ 16 year olds who go to high school all day work at night and on the weekends. 2 of them are Albertson's and Publix.  The kids who work at the homemade ice cream parlor down the road after school can't be more than 15 or 16. 

                        Bambini, I am not trying to start an argument here, but society has ALWAYS put celebrities way above scientists.  Britney Spears isn't any more popular than Elvis (actually much less) and in the 1960s women screamed and fainted over the Beatles.  Movie stars have always been put on pedestals and lived glamorous lives as if they were gods. Speaking of biographies, more books have been written about Jack The Ripper than Albert Einstein.  This is nothing new.  However, it sounds as if your niece might want to turn the channel, since the Discovery and the History channels and PBS are filled with educational material. 

                        Every generation has its problems, its rebels, its drop-outs.  Many of the brave men & women fighting in Iraq are teenagers.

                          cps10's avatar - Lottery-004.jpg
                          The Carolinas - Charlotte
                          United States
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                          September 12, 2005
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                          Posted: January 23, 2007, 10:39 am - IP Logged

                          So what you are saying that 22 grand a year per child (Dept. of Education statistic)  is not enough money.  The majority of american parents don't give a rats ass about their childrens future, and only care about  their kids making a fashion statment.  If that is the case, the U.S. can kiss its future goodbye.  On a personal note my 3 year old, has recently taken his preschool test.  He knew his numbers, the alphabet,  geometric shapes and colors.    The test administrator said he is at third grade level, if that is the standard for third grade we are in trouble.    You cannot have success in life Sir Metro, if your given a third rate education.    Lets face it.    When the majority of high school graduates can't make change something is wrong.

                          $22k a year? Geezus...the private school where I attended is only $17k a year nowadays...back when I was there it was around $7 or $8k. So the public schools here in my town are getting MORE money than private school students pay and the education is far worse? That stinks.

                           

                          But I do think that parents need to better discipline their children, teach them respect and to work hard. A lot of parents in this area couldn't give a hill of beans what their kid is doing, so long as they are out of their hair and not causing trouble. Even then, they may not care about the trouble part.

                          The North Carolina Education Lottery - so much a joke that here are their mascots:

                          Stooges

                            cps10's avatar - Lottery-004.jpg
                            The Carolinas - Charlotte
                            United States
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                            September 12, 2005
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                            Posted: January 23, 2007, 10:46 am - IP Logged

                            One of the key problems with youth today, is that our society puts actors, singers and sports figures on a higher pedestal than scientists, and academics.   Their are more  TV biographies on Britney Spears, than on Albert Einstein.  I have a 16 year old niece and I have told her numerous times, she should at least learn how to type, file, learn AP systems.  She has no interest in any of it.  She is going to be an actress.  Thats it, she has no back up plan. 

                            Funny you mention this, bambini. My son - who is 6 - ALWAYS tells everyone when he is asked "What do you want to be when you grow up?" - "I want to be a scientist." You can never imagine how good that makes me feel. He loves going to school and loves learning. This kid will sit around and prefer to watch Food Network (I know, a little odd I admit) than cartoons, or music videos. He is a well-rounded kid with tons of interest, which isn't something you see these days. Just like you said - give me the spotlight, make me rich and famous- is how most kids are, and how their parents tell them that they can make it that way, when the grim reality is that being one of those people isn't in the cards for 99.99% of ALL people.

                            Although, my son also says that he is going to do all of this when he gets older: scientist (always #1 to him), a race car driver (makes sense since we are in NECKCAR country), a basketball player, a football player, a coach. And believe me, he doesn't care about the money. He knows all those professions make tons of money, but he is interested in excelling at what he is interested in. Oh, and I forgot, a video game designer...lol

                            We kind of tested him and told him about a friend of our family - Dakota Fanning - and how much she made in her last movie. His eyes got really big, but we asked him if he wanted to be an actor, and he said "No way!". Hello Little Mister Scientist! :)

                            The North Carolina Education Lottery - so much a joke that here are their mascots:

                            Stooges