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Will robber get to keep lottery jackpot?

Topic closed. 28 replies. Last post 9 years ago by tg636.

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go4it-andwin's avatar - drevil
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massachusetts
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November 19, 2007
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Posted: November 29, 2007, 11:37 pm - IP Logged

I would think that this guy must have some sort of gambling problem that was recognized by massachusetts or it wouldnt be part of his probationary terms...could be he supported a gambling habit that cause him to rob that bank...hard to say.

with a prayer and 6 lucky numbers...im beach bound!

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    Kentucky
    United States
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    February 14, 2006
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    Posted: November 30, 2007, 6:11 am - IP Logged

    At first I thought they might take the winnings but after reading this I think he may have a chance at keeping the winnings. if I was a lawyer I would probably take this take his case.
       

    I Agree!

    When mental illness is added into the equation.

    "Elliott was placed on five years' probation after pleading guilty in October 2006 to unarmed robbery"

    Maybe when he robbed that bank he used his thumb and forefinger as a make believe gun.

    If he really knew that he couldn't buy lottery tickets, why did he buy one, win, cash it, and have his picture taken holding the check?

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      New Member

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      Posted: November 30, 2007, 9:05 pm - IP Logged

      This is really lame if they take away his prize. 

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        MI
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        August 14, 2005
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        Posted: December 1, 2007, 8:40 am - IP Logged

        The only ones that will get any money from this are the lawyers.

        If it's  determined he purchased and cashed the ticket illegally the money goes back to the state. But wait, they have a winning ticket and and no owner, who gets it now? Back to litigation

        If it's determined it's ok for him to keep getting the money, then doesn't he owe for all the past free mental health care he's received? Back to litigation.

        If the lottery commision determines that the ticket was illegal and tries to put the money back in the general fun, isn't it possible that the state mental health system declares that the money is theirs and decides to fight for it.?Back to litigation.

        Meanwhile, his family, the same ones that didn't want anything to do with him until now, are all trying to get themselves designated his legal guardian. Back to litigation.

        The way I see it, there is already 10-15 lawyers involved in this, so no matter the outcome, this poor guy will never see another penny of it.

        If he's smart he will go rob another bank and get thrown back in jail where neither his family or the lawyers can bother him.Wink

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          December 30, 2002
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          Posted: December 1, 2007, 11:49 pm - IP Logged

          It seems to me that violating probation should involve put him back in jail, not taking his winnings.  If they do take his winnings, that is equal to a $1 million dollar fine, and I would think a lawyer could see if there is precedent for that among people on similar probation who are caught gambling being fined a similar amount or having their entire winnings taken.  Does the probation say "All gambling winnings shall be forfeited to the state"?

          The other problem I have is that cases like this make states more likely to go over big winners with a fine tooth comb to prove some way to make them ineligible to win the money.  The state has a  financial interest in it, they would make a million dollars profit by making someone "ineligible". That prize won't be going back in the pool to be won by someone else, it will be kept by the state.

          But yeah, not too smart to be photographed at lottery HQ. You would think someone who is as well aquainted with the legal system as a convicted bank robber would at least visit a lawyer and pick up the prize anonymously. 

            go4it-andwin's avatar - drevil
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            massachusetts
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            Posted: December 2, 2007, 11:00 pm - IP Logged

            Lets put it this way...this guy has more headaches by winning the lottery...i hope he is not spending it before he is sure it is his to spend..as we all know he is fighting the state of massachusetts...and the state very rarely loses!  Im betting that the state is going to say that he knew about his gambling restrictions and there-for he shouldnt be entitled to the winnings!!!!!!  Personally the only one whos coming out ahead of this mess is the lawyers at $300 per hour...Sad who the real criminals are....that is the justice system!!!

            with a prayer and 6 lucky numbers...im beach bound!

              dumars798's avatar - batman17
              Atlanta
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              December 20, 2005
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              Posted: December 3, 2007, 10:11 am - IP Logged

              Lets put it this way...this guy has more headaches by winning the lottery...i hope he is not spending it before he is sure it is his to spend..as we all know he is fighting the state of massachusetts...and the state very rarely loses!  Im betting that the state is going to say that he knew about his gambling restrictions and there-for he shouldnt be entitled to the winnings!!!!!!  Personally the only one whos coming out ahead of this mess is the lawyers at $300 per hour...Sad who the real criminals are....that is the justice system!!!

              I Agree!

                      Smart bets...... Equal Phat Pocket$!

                                   

                           





                Bradly_60's avatar - disney37
                Atlantic Mine, Michigan
                United States
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                June 23, 2002
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                Posted: December 4, 2007, 7:43 am - IP Logged

                He should be able to keep his winnings but he should be punished for violating his parole. 

                Brad

                  nanolike's avatar - pink2
                  WorldWide
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                  Posted: December 7, 2007, 12:28 am - IP Logged

                  You know what the strangest  thing about this whole story/case is?

                  The very crime that he did was purchase something that the state aided in, in otherwords

                  Most crimes dont usually involve the state selling the very thing that causes a person to be labeled a criminal. He bought it from the State. Someone who buys drugs in otherwords buys it from an illegal drug dealer.

                  In this situation the drugs dealers were the State themselves selling the drugs(the ticket) But its legal for them to sell.

                  The state sold the drugs to him and now they want topunish him for what they sold him. They're prosecuting him for what they sold him.

                  Thats just sort of strange, if you look at it in that way! 

                   Unhappy

                   

                   

                  The winner of a $1 million lottery scratch ticket may not be so lucky after all:  He's a convicted bank robber who isn't supposed to gamble. We'll maybe the state shouldnt be selling something the drug in the first place.

                   

                  Maybe the money should go to help people addicted in what they sell. I love the way the state gets away with selling "addictions" under the guise of "entertainment" I think all forms of gamgling should be a violation for the guy unless the very state that has him on probabtion sells it to him! He got the ticket from them not some illegal place down the road operating illegally. He got the stickin ticket from the STATE!  

                   

                  Just sayin!

                   

                  Just sayin why criminalize your customer! Thats all he really was,just  a customer of something you legally sell.

                  Its not like he went and robbed a bank or something!! geesh! Wink

                  It's a NanoLike World!

                    four4me's avatar - gate1
                    MD
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                    Posted: December 7, 2007, 1:01 am - IP Logged

                    When you are released from prison they set the rules by which you can live by until you are off of probation.

                    One of the things he was told was.

                    Under terms of his probation, he "may not gamble, purchase lottery tickets or visit an establishment where gaming is conducted, including restaurants where Keno may be played."

                    While buying a lottery ticket isn't a criminal offense for most citizens he violated his probation when he tried to cash a wining ticket.

                      nanolike's avatar - pink2
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                      Posted: December 7, 2007, 1:48 am - IP Logged

                      There is a truth in the old song

                      I fought the Law and the, Law won!

                       Yet I think all people should be able to buy a ticket if the state is selling!

                       

                      The probation rules should say,"You can only buy lottery tickets and scratcher games from a state run office or retailer or legal state market, and only from the state! If you are found gambling "illegally" outside of buying from the state, it is a violation of your probation.

                      But that State criminalizing the public on probation is criminalizing itself!

                      It's a NanoLike World!

                        justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                        Wandering Aimlessly
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                        Posted: December 7, 2007, 6:50 am - IP Logged

                        Nanolike writes:  "Most crimes dont usually involve the state selling the very thing that causes a person to be labeled a criminal. He bought it from the State. Someone who buys drugs in otherwords buys it from an illegal drug dealer."

                        I guess you aren't familiar with all the alcohol related traffic deaths, rapes and murders. Buying alcohol is legal.  It's also legal to buy a gun.  We get our driver's licenses from the State and then people go out and kill someone by running a red light or driving recklessly. 

                        I see where you are going with this and agree that buying lottery tickets can be very addictive and not just a form of entertainment for many of us.  However, I also believe you are looking at this in the wrong light. 

                        Let's use the example of the person who has several DUIs and has served some time in jail.  One condition of his probation is that he can't drink. He can't go to a bar or liquor store and buy alcohol. If he does, he is violating the terms of his probation.  This man was ordered not to gamble, including buying lottery tickets.

                        So, let's say I go into a restaurant and ask for a glass of wine with my grilled salmon.  I'm over 50 so the server isn't going to ask me for identification. He doesn't need to know if I'm allergic to fish or on probation for DUI.  It's not his job. So unless all the lottery retailers have to ask for ID and check our criminal backgrounds, it's not up to the State to monitor our lottery purchases. However, it is up to us to act responsibly. If someone has a psychiatric disorder, then perhaps he needs someone to handle his money.

                        Being a lottery player, my first reaction was "give him the darn money" but if he robbed a bank, he is a criminal and must obey the terms of his release.  If he is mentally ill, then maybe the money can be used to help him and others with gambling problems.  However, we can't just keep making excuses for people who commit crimes.   

                          masslottery's avatar - dragon eye.jpg

                          United States
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                          February 28, 2006
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                          Posted: December 7, 2007, 11:20 pm - IP Logged

                          The winner of a $1 million lottery scratch ticket may not be so lucky after all:  He's a convicted bank robber who isn't supposed to gamble.

                          Timothy Elliott faces a Dec. 7 court hearing over whether he violated his probation when he bought the $10 ticket for the $800 Million Spectacular game at a supermarket in Hyannis.

                          Elliott was placed on five years' probation after pleading guilty in October 2006 to unarmed robbery for a January 2006 heist at a bank on Cape Cod. Under terms of his probation, he "may not gamble, purchase lottery tickets or visit an establishment where gaming is conducted, including restaurants where Keno may be played."

                          Elliott, 55, has collected the first of 20 annual $50,000 checks from the Massachusetts lottery commission. A picture of Elliott, holding his first check, was posted on the lottery's Web site Monday, though it was removed by Wednesday.

                          As part of his sentence, Elliott was put under the care of the state Mental Health Department and sent to a hospital for treatment, and state officials refused Wednesday to say whether he was still being treated.

                          A telephone number for Elliott could not immediately be located Wednesday, and it was not clear whether he had a lawyer.

                          The lottery routinely cross references the names of winners with the state Revenue Department to see if they owe back taxes or child support, lottery spokesman Dan Rosenfeld said. In those cases, winnings go straight to the Revenue Department.

                          But in this case, it will be up to the court to determine what will happen with Elliott's winnings.

                          "This is kind of new territory," he said.

                          This photo released by the Massachusetts State Lottery shows Timothy B. Elliott in the Lottery's Braintree, Mass., office Monday, Nov. 26, 2007, after he won a $1 million prize playing the Lottery's $800,000,000 Spectacular. He's in trouble because he's also a convicted bank robber who isn't supposed to be gambling. The state probation commissioner's office has scheduled a hearing for December 7 to determine whether Elliott, 55, violated his probation when he bought the $10 ticket.

                                         Agree with stupid  dummy

                                         Thinking of...that's all i have too sayI Agree!

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                            Posted: December 9, 2007, 12:45 am - IP Logged

                            Here's the latest.

                            http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2007/12/08/lottery_hopes_to_pay_winnings_to_ex_convict/

                            >"We would like to see him get his money," Dan Rosenfeld, a spokesman for the lottery, said yesterday. "What we are talking about is the integrity of the game. He played the game. He won the game. The integrity of the game is very important to us. That's our business."

                             

                             This is a good point. From a sales perspective, the lottery can't afford to have people pass up the lottery because they think the state is going to grab their winnings if they've had a questionable past and it is now "state policy" to go for winnings confiscation.  It doesn't matter if it's actually true or not if the perception is there. People get paranoid and stop playing, other people  get angry and stop playing. It doesn't win the lottery new customers, that's for sure.