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Pa. lawmaker wants to give lottery winners right to remain anonymous

Topic closed. 77 replies. Last post 3 years ago by Kejana48.

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Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
Los Angeles, California
United States
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January 5, 2011
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Posted: December 8, 2013, 2:10 pm - IP Logged

I guess I'm in the minority here: I don't like anonymous.

There's several different levels of publication of winners in different states:

1. Full disclosure: Full name given out in marketing/promotion and cannot be refused.
2. Partial disclosure: Marketing/promotion can be refused, only first name and last initial shown in an initial listing. No picture with ginormous check, no other promos. But person's full name is given out on public records request.
3. Trust option: same as #2, except that if you claim as a trust, only the name of the trust is given out on public records request, not the name of the winner.
4. Anonymous: no disclosure of winner at all.

I'm comfortable with #3 that we have now.

There is a need to know. But if someone really wants to be anonymous, they can form a trust. That way there's some effort required.

And they could even do things like delay public records disclosure, which is done in other cases. Say for about a year or so to give you time to get away, set up your affairs and security.

    mrcraft's avatar - images3lp4 zps7dbb4a10.jpg
    Los Angeles, California
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    December 2, 2013
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    Posted: December 8, 2013, 3:02 pm - IP Logged

    I was thinking about this the other day.  I see both sides, but my main concern would be my safety.  I can deal with phone calls, letters, emails and such, but worry about people that find my address and decide to show up at my door. 

    In California, full names and location are used in their promotional materials. 

    I like the first name, last name initial method.  If I happen to get lucky, I may need to research the trust option.

      New York's avatar - 103h4yr
      NYC
      United States
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      October 19, 2011
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      Posted: December 8, 2013, 3:05 pm - IP Logged
        Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

        United States
        Member #142499
        May 13, 2013
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        Posted: December 8, 2013, 3:15 pm - IP Logged

        I guess I'm in the minority here: I don't like anonymous.

        There's several different levels of publication of winners in different states:

        1. Full disclosure: Full name given out in marketing/promotion and cannot be refused.
        2. Partial disclosure: Marketing/promotion can be refused, only first name and last initial shown in an initial listing. No picture with ginormous check, no other promos. But person's full name is given out on public records request.
        3. Trust option: same as #2, except that if you claim as a trust, only the name of the trust is given out on public records request, not the name of the winner.
        4. Anonymous: no disclosure of winner at all.

        I'm comfortable with #3 that we have now.

        There is a need to know. But if someone really wants to be anonymous, they can form a trust. That way there's some effort required.

        And they could even do things like delay public records disclosure, which is done in other cases. Say for about a year or so to give you time to get away, set up your affairs and security.

        Sorry, but other than us being nosy and wanting to get an insight into the type of person that won, why do you need to know? It certainly isn't any of our business, and it certainly doesn't benefit the person who wins an enormous sum of money. The lottery works just fine in other developed countries who don't reveal the winner's identity, and with $100M or more becoming increasing common, that alone is a big enough draw to get people to play it. 

        PriceWaterhouseCoopers and other big name accounting firms have been doing audits on lotteries for years, that should be enough for any non-tinfoil hat wearing individual to believe that the lottery and lottery winnres are real.

        How much have they claimed they've given to education? Over a billion dollars. Well, I haven't seen them trot out any school officials in front of a camera to vouch that they've actually given up that amount of money, but I do know that since they get audited they can't make that kind of claim without ending up in court. 

        Therefore, if we have to take their word about how much they donate to schools and the community, why we can take their word about who wins a JP. And notice, they are only interested in the JP winners. I don't see them mandating press conferences or calling for media appearances for the $10,000 winners. They claim X number of people win $10,000, $25,000 etc per week and we take their word on that. 

        Given all of that, it is patently obviously that  transparency is simply an excuse. Your WANT (not need) to know who won a JP should not outweigh that person's personal safety. How many death threats, slashed tires and murders have to be committed to prove that the individual's well-being should supercede a skeptic's doubt?

          Avatar
          New Member
          Oakland, CA
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          December 8, 2013
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          Posted: December 8, 2013, 5:04 pm - IP Logged

          Anonymity is completely logical. Say you've had a succesful enough career that you live exactly where you want to live in the house you've grown to love. You win the lottery and they release your name, your city, the location of where you purchased your ticket and now it''ll take 30 seconds for someone to find you. As I pointed out to my father the other night, if I win the lottery what's to stop people who know of me going to their house to pester my family about my money when it's got nothing to do with them, but because it's where I was known to have lived growing up, their home is now a target? That's completely unfair. The number one thing lottery winners report is the stress of dealing with all the strangers and long lost acquaintances who heard about your good fortune and convince themselves they're deserving of a hand out for one reason or another, let alone the people willing and wanting to do harm out of jealousy or in an attempt to extort the winner and their families. It's just good sense to keep winners anonymous, let them *choose* to go public or not.

            Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
            Zeta Reticuli Star System
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            Posted: December 8, 2013, 5:30 pm - IP Logged

            Savagegoose once mentioned that Australian playslips have a NP option - No Publicity or something. Sounds like a great idea.

            I figure jackpot winners can either remain anonymous (if allowed by their state) or wish they had remained anonymous.

            I don't get people that demand to know who won......sorry, no need to know and not on the access roster.

            Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

            Lep

            There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

              gocart1's avatar - lighthouse
              ONEONTA,NEW YORK
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              Posted: December 8, 2013, 5:46 pm - IP Logged

              This is actually not a bad idea i  like to see the pictures but safety first i guess

              I Agree!

                Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
                Los Angeles, California
                United States
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                January 5, 2011
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                Posted: December 8, 2013, 5:52 pm - IP Logged

                Sorry, but other than us being nosy and wanting to get an insight into the type of person that won, why do you need to know? It certainly isn't any of our business, and it certainly doesn't benefit the person who wins an enormous sum of money. The lottery works just fine in other developed countries who don't reveal the winner's identity, and with $100M or more becoming increasing common, that alone is a big enough draw to get people to play it. 

                PriceWaterhouseCoopers and other big name accounting firms have been doing audits on lotteries for years, that should be enough for any non-tinfoil hat wearing individual to believe that the lottery and lottery winnres are real.

                How much have they claimed they've given to education? Over a billion dollars. Well, I haven't seen them trot out any school officials in front of a camera to vouch that they've actually given up that amount of money, but I do know that since they get audited they can't make that kind of claim without ending up in court. 

                Therefore, if we have to take their word about how much they donate to schools and the community, why we can take their word about who wins a JP. And notice, they are only interested in the JP winners. I don't see them mandating press conferences or calling for media appearances for the $10,000 winners. They claim X number of people win $10,000, $25,000 etc per week and we take their word on that. 

                Given all of that, it is patently obviously that  transparency is simply an excuse. Your WANT (not need) to know who won a JP should not outweigh that person's personal safety. How many death threats, slashed tires and murders have to be committed to prove that the individual's well-being should supercede a skeptic's doubt?

                It's not my right to know, it's the public's right to know what their government is doing with their money.

                The lottery is a government run monopoly gambling operation. Wouldn't you like to play pick 3 for $900 str at your local shop? You can't, because the lottery has a monopoly.

                Government is corrupt, and requires transparency so that the public and the press can inspect what THEIR government is doing and how funds are being spent. Lottery is essentially fundraising with an entertainment twist, also can be seen as a regressive tax.

                Do you think criminals would commit crimes more, less or the same, if they knew nobody was watching? If everything was anonymous and nobody outside the lottery could check, do you think there would there be more fraud or less?

                People often criticise celebrities for complaining about, "oh, I can't go around in public anonymously anymore, I'm too rich and famous. Poor me, life is so hard." Well, there are consequences with having all that fame, money and power. you give some things up. Lottery winners expect everything to be the same when they win hundreds of millions of dollars, and that's just not the way the world goes round. Suck it up, and deal with it. Or you can form a trust and hide.

                  Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                  Zeta Reticuli Star System
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                  Posted: December 8, 2013, 6:08 pm - IP Logged

                  Jon D,

                  "It's not my right to know, it's the public's right to know what their government is doing with their money."

                  Then how come so many 'publics' in so many countries are just fine with winners being anonymous - and not taxed? And what about the winner's rights? Should a jackpot winner be innundated with pleas from charities and deals from shysters and who knows what else just because some obnoxioulsy nosey clods somewhere think they have a 'right' to know who won?

                  If you really think the government has a monopoly on gambling, how come there are so many bookies? There's even bookies in Las Vegas - not the sports books, but bookies. The money legally bet on football in this country is mere chump change compared to what is bet illegally. The Super Bowl is a prime example.

                  Ever heard of Jessica Savitch? She was an investigative reporter doing a piece on illegal sports betting and her car went down a hill in a 'mudslide' in NJ.

                  And there are plenty of people still playing "Policy" or "The Number" with their 'man' - you would know these games as Pick 3.

                  Here's what the bookies know, legal or illegal, players are going to find the action.

                  You also said,

                  " If everything was anonymous and nobody outside the lottery could check, do you think there would there be more fraud or less?"

                  Please then tell us how you explain the states that allow players to be anonymous.

                  Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                  Lep

                  There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                    Jon D's avatar - calotterylogo
                    Los Angeles, California
                    United States
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                    January 5, 2011
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                    Posted: December 8, 2013, 6:18 pm - IP Logged

                    Jon D,

                    "It's not my right to know, it's the public's right to know what their government is doing with their money."

                    Then how come so many 'publics' in so many countries are just fine with winners being anonymous - and not taxed? And what about the winner's rights? Should a jackpot winner be innundated with pleas from charities and deals from shysters and who knows what else just because some obnoxioulsy nosey clods somewhere think they have a 'right' to know who won?

                    If you really think the government has a monopoly on gambling, how come there are so many bookies? There's even bookies in Las Vegas - not the sports books, but bookies. The money legally bet on football in this country is mere chump change compared to what is bet illegally. The Super Bowl is a prime example.

                    Ever heard of Jessica Savitch? She was an investigative reporter doing a piece on illegal sports betting and her car went down a hill in a 'mudslide' in NJ.

                    And there are plenty of people still playing "Policy" or "The Number" with their 'man' - you would know these games as Pick 3.

                    Here's what the bookies know, legal or illegal, players are going to find the action.

                    You also said,

                    " If everything was anonymous and nobody outside the lottery could check, do you think there would there be more fraud or less?"

                    Please then tell us how you explain the states that allow players to be anonymous.

                    Yes, they have a monopoly on LEGAL lottery gaming. If your argument is based on illegal activity, that is beyond the scope of my argument. Thanks.

                      Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                      Zeta Reticuli Star System
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                      Posted: December 8, 2013, 7:36 pm - IP Logged

                      Jon D,

                      Thanks for the reply and you adjusred your statement to legal gambling.

                      Don't know if he's still active but there was a bookie in NY, dealth with a lot of Wall Street types. His policy was $50,000 minimum bet per game, two game minimum to bet with him. Not exactly an office pool on the Super Bowl here. Oh yeah, both he and his clients preferred remaining anonymous!

                      Green laugh

                      Here's a little known fact, bookies are required to get a Federal Tax Stamp (used to cost about $50, not sure now - and who really does this?) but when they get pinched if they get sentenced having the stamp reduces the sentence.

                      Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

                      Lep

                      There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                        JackpotWanna's avatar - squiz

                        United States
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                        Posted: December 8, 2013, 8:09 pm - IP Logged

                        Good idea! Only way is to move near other rich people.  Smile

                          Bondi Junction
                          Australia
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                          December 24, 2007
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                          Posted: December 8, 2013, 11:01 pm - IP Logged

                          One of the most important decisions for new winners to make is whether to opt to go public or remain anonymous. If a winner decides to talk publicly about their win, Camelot’s PR team will organise a press conference and handle all media interest on their behalf, removing the anxiety that can accompany talking about a big win.

                          If they have requested to remain anonymous, Camelot takes its obligations and duty of care to protect winners’ privacy very seriously. Unless a winner agrees to take full publicity and signs an agreement to that effect, no information about them can be released by Camelot into the public domain.

                           

                          Camelot UK Lotteries Ltd are the current UK national lottery operators

                          We all get a lot out of lotteries!

                            veganlife125's avatar - Lottery-061.jpg

                            United States
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                            May 18, 2013
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                            Posted: December 9, 2013, 12:46 am - IP Logged

                            I guess I'm in the minority here: I don't like anonymous.

                            There's several different levels of publication of winners in different states:

                            1. Full disclosure: Full name given out in marketing/promotion and cannot be refused.
                            2. Partial disclosure: Marketing/promotion can be refused, only first name and last initial shown in an initial listing. No picture with ginormous check, no other promos. But person's full name is given out on public records request.
                            3. Trust option: same as #2, except that if you claim as a trust, only the name of the trust is given out on public records request, not the name of the winner.
                            4. Anonymous: no disclosure of winner at all.

                            I'm comfortable with #3 that we have now.

                            There is a need to know. But if someone really wants to be anonymous, they can form a trust. That way there's some effort required.

                            And they could even do things like delay public records disclosure, which is done in other cases. Say for about a year or so to give you time to get away, set up your affairs and security.

                            Agreed Jon D. 

                            I also don't understand why all winners don't claim in a trust for the protection.

                            Don't forget to visit the Lottery Post Gift Shop!

                              DC81's avatar - batman39
                              MI
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                              Posted: December 9, 2013, 1:03 am - IP Logged

                              Even just the first letter of someone's last name could be enough to still find them unless they live in well populated county and have a fairly common (or commonly spelled) first name. Still better than your whole name though. It's important to at least have options to protect your identity.

                              You can't predict random.