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Players seek $250 million from Texas Lottery contractor

Topic closed. 24 replies. Last post 2 years ago by jimmy4164.

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rcbbuckeye's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
Texas
United States
Member #55889
October 23, 2007
5588 Posts
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Posted: December 17, 2014, 8:18 am - IP Logged

I posted on another thread that I have one of those tics. Didn't get 3 fives in a tic tac toe. The tic had a 5 in all 4 corners. Did get the money bag with 5x. If I had gotten a tic tac toe the prize on the tic was $500. So the rational is that because I got the 5x money bag I won $2500. Well, there is no $2500 prize tier for this game, so common sense alone tells me I didn't win. That's not too hard to figure out. Was it a little confusing at first? Yes. But again, a little common sense was all that was needed. And to be sure, I took the tic to the store and scanned it.

On a side note, the suit is against G-Tech because there is a law that the Texas Lottery Commission can't be sued. My understanding is that the lawyers are trying to circumvent that by going to lawmakers to make an exception. Good luck with that.

Dawn Nettles got this whole thing started because she's had a burr up her rear for TLC for years.

CAN'T WIN IF YOU'RE NOT IN

A DOLLAR AND A DREAM (OR $2)

    Get paid's avatar - Lottery-062.jpg
    texas
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    February 11, 2014
    168 Posts
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    Posted: December 17, 2014, 2:20 pm - IP Logged

    I don,t play any games thats sounds confusing,especially those crossword games,keep it simple.Quick pic please.

      Avatar
      Kentucky
      United States
      Member #32652
      February 14, 2006
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      Posted: December 17, 2014, 11:25 pm - IP Logged

      "Being confused, ignorant and foolish is no reason to be rewarded."

      "It doesn't look like you followed Bill Cosby's current problems."

      Is he asking to be rewarded for being confused, ignorant and foolish too?   Players like him don't usually complain when they buy a losing lottery ticket.

      Bill is not asking, but several of the women he was with at the Playboy Mansion 40 to 50 years want rewarded. According to most of the women, Bill was player.

        HaveABall's avatar - rocket

        United States
        Member #72448
        March 18, 2009
        1227 Posts
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        Posted: December 18, 2014, 12:16 am - IP Logged

        I Agree! Totally. For example l hear that there are internet sites showing one how to make " bombs".. If one decides to go ahead and make one leading to one's arrest- one cannot say " Hey, it's out there, all l did was make one"... Nice try.

        These folk have as much chance of winning this lawsuit as l have of finding my wallet l lost while upside down riding the " Demon" at Great America back in 2005.

        I rode on that "demon" ride and enjoyed it each time.  Cheers! Eek

        Having several millions of dollars in my financial accounts means receiving several valuable services each day!

        Disney

          RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
          mid-Ohio
          United States
          Member #9
          March 24, 2001
          19816 Posts
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          Posted: December 18, 2014, 12:32 am - IP Logged

          Bill is not asking, but several of the women he was with at the Playboy Mansion 40 to 50 years want rewarded. According to most of the women, Bill was player.

          Everybody who went to the Playboy Mansion in those days was a player, even the ladies.  I read about them claiming to in the PB mansion when they were 14-15, sounds like they should have been home doing their school work instead.  Now that they are getting near retirement age they want a pension.

           * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
             
                       Evil Looking       

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            Kentucky
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            February 14, 2006
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            Posted: December 18, 2014, 3:40 pm - IP Logged

            Everybody who went to the Playboy Mansion in those days was a player, even the ladies.  I read about them claiming to in the PB mansion when they were 14-15, sounds like they should have been home doing their school work instead.  Now that they are getting near retirement age they want a pension.

            LOL

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              Northern California
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              August 9, 2005
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              Posted: December 22, 2014, 7:43 pm - IP Logged

              "we were confused about the rules - but we want you to pay us anyway" has been tried many, many times in the industry. I doubt it will work here...but this is Texas. Strange things happen.

              And Lottery operator doesn't approve the rules. The Lottery Commission (NOT the Legislature, as was previously posted) does.

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                Northern California
                United States
                Member #19948
                August 9, 2005
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                Posted: December 22, 2014, 7:52 pm - IP Logged

                With all due respect, Ms. Nettles is a juggaloon.

                 

                I used to work on this account (I was the regional Marketing Director for GTECH).

                 

                Dawn showed up at a retailer meeting regarding the upcoming Pick 3 game (claiming that, as a member of the press, she had a right to attend a private business meeting). When the quesiton and answer period came up she asked me - with a total "AHA" look on her face "if the odds of winning 3-straight (exact order) are 1:1000, then why isn't the top prize $1,000?"

                 

                I said, "well Dawn, you forgot the prize payout %. (since she used my first name, like we were drinking buddies) The laws of the State of Texas require that the Lottery return revenue to the State. So the State get's a cut, and the Lottery and the Operator get some funds to run the Lottery, plus the retailers get paid for handling & merchandising the product. So, if the game is set up to run at 60% payout, the top prize at those odds is $600 - exactly as its set up under the law".

                When will people stop treating her like she's some sort of industry expert? She's not. Her animus at the lottery not letting her dictate operational decisions under the guise of "public input" is an insult to intellilgent people.

                  mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
                  Texas Panhandle
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                  December 20, 2012
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                  Posted: December 22, 2014, 11:22 pm - IP Logged

                  Everybody who went to the Playboy Mansion in those days was a player, even the ladies.  I read about them claiming to in the PB mansion when they were 14-15, sounds like they should have been home doing their school work instead.  Now that they are getting near retirement age they want a pension.

                  I used to see photos of several of those women in the Playboy mansion hot tub with some guy and would think : "STD soup."


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                    July 10, 2010
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                    Posted: December 23, 2014, 5:35 pm - IP Logged

                    Do You Trust Gtech?

                    If you do, I think you should take a look at how they treated Texans in years past...

                    George Wins the Lottery
                    by Greg Palast

                    The Bush family daisy chain of favors, friendship and finance goes way back to Dubya's "War Years." Junior Bush was a fighter pilot during the war in Vietnam; not in the United States Air Force, where one could get seriously hurt, mind you, but in the Texas air force, known as the Texas Air National Guard. Texas's toy army, an artifact of Civil War days, is a favorite club for warmongers who are a bit squeamish about actual combat. Membership excused these weekend warriors from the military draft and the real shoot-'em-up in 'Nam.

                    During the war, Senator Prescott Bush and his son, Congressman George Bush Sr., were more than happy to send other men's sons and grandsons to Southeast Asia. However, there were not enough volunteers for this suspect enterprise, so Congress created a kind of death lottery: If your birth date was picked out of a hat, off to the army you went. But the Air Guard flyboys were exempted from this macabre draft lotto.

                    When tested for the coveted Air Guard get-out, young George W. tested at twenty-five out of one hundred, one point above "too-dumb-to-fly" status, yet leaped ahead of hundreds of applicants to get the Guard slot.

                    Now, how could that happen? Only recently could I get a glimmer of the truth, a by-product of an Observer investigation of a New Jersey company called GTech. This firm holds the contract for a far less deadly and far more lucrative lottery operation than the one for the military draft: the Texas State Lottery.

                    Follow the money. It's 1997. Top-gun George Jr. is governor and GTech is in deep doo-doo with Texas lottery regulators. Texas is the nation's biggest, most lucrative lottery and GTech was about to lose its contract, worth hundreds of millions of dollars. The state's lottery director was sacked following revelations that GTech had put the director's boyfriend on the company payroll while he was under indictment for bribery. A new clean-hands director, Lawrence Littwin, ordered an audit, terminated GTech's contract and put it out for rebid. Littwin also launched an investigation into GTech's political donations.

                    Then a funny thing happened: The Texas Lottery Commission fired Littwin.

                    Almost immediately thereafter, the Bush-appointed commissioners canceled the bidding for a new operator, though the low bidder had already been announced to replace GTech. The commissioners also halted the financial audit, ended the political payola investigation and gave the contract back to GTech.

                    Why did the Texas government work so hard at saving GTech's license? A letter to the U.S. Justice Department � I have obtained a copy � provides some fascinating details. The writer points to one Ben Barnes, a lobbyist to whom GTech paid fees of $23 million. Way back in 1968, according to the whistleblower, an aide to Barnes � then lieutenant governor of the Lone Star State � quietly suggested to Air Guard chief Brig. Gen. James Rose that he find a safe spot in the Guard for Congressman George Bush's son.

                    Whether the Bushes used their influence to get young George out of serving in Vietnam was a big issue during George Jr.'s neck-and-neck race for governor against Ann Richards in 1994. Bush's opponents, however, did not know of Barnes's office's contact with General Rose, so the story died.

                    The letter ties Barnes's knowledge of Governor Bush's draft-dodging to GTech's exclusive deal with the state: "Governor Bush . . . made a deal with Ben Barnes not to rebid [the GTech lottery contract] because Barnes could confirm that Bush had lied during the '94 campaign. During that campaign, Bush was asked if his father, then a member of Congress, had helped him get in the National Guard. Bush said 'no'...George Bush was placed ahead of thousands of young men, some of whom died in Viet Nam...Barnes agreed never to confirm the story and the governor talked to the chair of the lottery two days later, and she then agreed to support letting GTech keep the contract without a bid."

                    The whistleblower remained anonymous, but offered to come forward later to authorities. Fingering Barnes, a Democrat, as the man who put in the fix for the Bushes with the Air Guard seemed wildly implausible. The letter remained sealed and buried. No investigation followed, neither Barnes nor the letter writer were called by the Feds.

                    But then in 1998, Littwin�the discharged reform lottery director�filed a suit charging that the millions GTech paid for lobbyists bought them contract protection. He subpoenaed Barnes. In 1999, facing a grilling under oath Barnes admitted in a sworn statement to the court, that it was indeed him who got George W. into the Air Guard.

                    Amazingly though, he claimed to have done this nice thing for young George without any contact, direct or indirect, from the Bushes. How Barnes knew he should make the fix without a request from the powerful Bush family remains a mystery, one of those combinations of telepathy and coincidence common to Texas politics.

                    Littwin asserted that other witnesses can verify that the cash bought the governor's influence to save GTech's license. GTech responds irrefutably that it terminated its lobbying contract with Barnes before the 1997 dismissals of the lottery directors�but not before the blackmailing alleged in the anonymous letter. And, although the company denies it maintained the financial connection to Barnes, GTech's chairman, Guy Snowden, was a partner in a big real estate venture with Barnes's wife. (In 1995, Snowden was forced to resign as chairman of GTech when a jury found he tried to bribe British billionaire Richard Branson.)

                    What did GTech get for their $23 million to Barnes, the man who saved Dubya from the war? Can't say. In November 1999, GTech paid a reported $300,000 to Littwin; in return, Littwin agreed to seal forever Barnes's five-hour deposition transcript about the Bush family influence on the lottery and the Air Guard.

                    I'm not complaining, mind you. After all, the Bush family has given us the best democracy money can buy.

                    (From The Best Democracy Money Can Buy, by Greg Palast. Copyright � Greg Palast 2002, 2003.)