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New York man accused of running lottery con game

Scam AlertScam Alert: New York man accused of running lottery con game
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A Rochester, New York, man has been accused of running a lottery con game in which three senior citizens were persuaded to send him a total of $138,000 in order to claim their mega-bucks winnings.

The winnings were fictitious but the crime was real, federal prosecutors say: Roydel Nicholson was charged Friday with mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering in connection with the scheme, which he allegedly ran from his apartment on Van Auker Street.

A criminal complaint unsealed in U.S. District Court Friday accused the 62-year-old Nicholson of taking advantage of two elderly men in California and a senior woman in Detroit beginning in 2011 and 2012.

Nicholson or associates called each of the three victims and told them they had won millions of dollars in a lottery. To obtain their winnings, which in one case also included a BMW automobile, the victims were told to send money to Nicholson in Rochester. The funds ostensibly were to cover taxes, transportation costs and various fees.

It's the same type of scheme featured in unsolicited emails that jam many people's in-boxes, though the Federal Trade Commission warns they can be attempted via telephone as well and often target elderly people, who can be more trusting.

The complaint doesn't specify how the three alleged victims in Nicholson's case were first contacted, though it does describe repeated phone calls to them.

A 74-year-old man in Cottonwood, California, identified as R.B., who reportedly had been swindled in lottery scams before, was persuaded to send Nicholson an $8,000 check, the complaint states. A woman in Detroit, P.B., age 77, sent him three payments totaling $2,099.

And H.J., a 94-year-old man living in Paradise, California, wound up sending cash or cashier's checks to Nicholson's apartment 17 different times. The payments added up to at least $128,294, according to the complaint.

After being asked for another $14,446 in April 2014, H.J. asked for his money back. Someone identified by federal investigators as Nicholson responded in an August letter saying he couldn't refund the money because someone else had been handling the transactions.

Most of the proceeds of the alleged con were wired by Nicholson to various parties in Jamaica, according the complaint. Nicholson, who authorities said was a native of Jamaica and a legal permanent resident of this country, kept about $13,800 for himself.

The case was investigation by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

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13 comments. Last comment 2 years ago by dallascowboyfan.
Page 1 of 1
haymaker's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
Egg Harbor twp.south Jersey shore
United States
Member #112968
June 29, 2011
3856 Posts
Offline
Posted: April 25, 2015, 9:17 am - IP Logged

...to be shot at sunrise...NAW...let's do it NOW !

Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds    -- Charles Mackay  LL.D.

    maringoman's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcTbRxpKQmOfcCoUqF2FyqIOAwDo7rg9G-lfJLAALPGWJWwiz19eRw
    Massachusetts
    United States
    Member #37433
    April 14, 2006
    2747 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: April 25, 2015, 9:50 am - IP Logged

    I don't know how people keep falling for these cons. Angry

    That money's gone fo ever

      LottoMetro's avatar - Lottery-024.jpg
      Happyland
      United States
      Member #146344
      September 1, 2013
      1129 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: April 25, 2015, 10:08 am - IP Logged

      Jamaican me lose my mind, man.

      If the chances of winning the jackpot are so slim, why play when the jackpot is so small? Your chances never change, but the potential payoff does.
      If a crystal ball showed you the future of the rest of your life, and in that future you will never win a jackpot, would you still play?

      2016: -48.28% (13 tickets) ||
      P&L % = Total Win($)/Total Wager($) - 1

        duckman's avatar - ducklogodrake64x64
        Jacksonville Florida
        United States
        Member #23018
        October 6, 2005
        918 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: April 25, 2015, 10:51 am - IP Logged

        Life Rule One: "If you have won something or if something is advertised as 'free', then you should not have to pay ANYTHING up front. Not even 1 cent, not even the cost of a postage stamp, no credit card or bank account information, NOTHING up front. Period. No exceptions."

        Life Rule Two: "Treat ALL unsolicited phone calls and ALL unsolicited emails as scams because they probably ARE SCAMS."

          cbr$'s avatar - maren
          Cordova,Al.
          United States
          Member #104482
          January 15, 2011
          4910 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: April 25, 2015, 10:51 am - IP Logged

          A Rochester, New York, man has been accused of running a lottery con game in which three senior citizens were persuaded to send him a total of $138,000 in order to claim their mega-bucks winnings.

          The winnings were fictitious but the crime was real, federal prosecutors say: Roydel Nicholson was charged Friday with mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering in connection with the scheme, which he allegedly ran from his apartment on Van Auker Street.

          A criminal complaint unsealed in U.S. District Court Friday accused the 62-year-old Nicholson of taking advantage of two elderly men in California and a senior woman in Detroit beginning in 2011 and 2012.

          Nicholson or associates called each of the three victims and told them they had won millions of dollars in a lottery. To obtain their winnings, which in one case also included a BMW automobile, the victims were told to send money to Nicholson in Rochester. The funds ostensibly were to cover taxes, transportation costs and various fees.

          It's the same type of scheme featured in unsolicited emails that jam many people's in-boxes, though the Federal Trade Commission warns they can be attempted via telephone as well and often target elderly people, who can be more trusting.

          The complaint doesn't specify how the three alleged victims in Nicholson's case were first contacted, though it does describe repeated phone calls to them.

          A 74-year-old man in Cottonwood, California, identified as R.B., who reportedly had been swindled in lottery scams before, was persuaded to send Nicholson an $8,000 check, the complaint states. A woman in Detroit, P.B., age 77, sent him three payments totaling $2,099.

          And H.J., a 94-year-old man living in Paradise, California, wound up sending cash or cashier's checks to Nicholson's apartment 17 different times. The payments added up to at least $128,294, according to the complaint.

          After being asked for another $14,446 in April 2014, H.J. asked for his money back. Someone identified by federal investigators as Nicholson responded in an August letter saying he couldn't refund the money because someone else had been handling the transactions.

          Most of the proceeds of the alleged con were wired by Nicholson to various parties in Jamaica, according the complaint. Nicholson, who authorities said was a native of Jamaica and a legal permanent resident of this country, kept about $13,800 for himself.

          The case was investigation by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

          Sad, case. I really would like to hear that the system made these con artist's payback ever penny to the people they steal it from, then do time , plus community service in a senior place.

            noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
            Bay Area - California
            United States
            Member #136477
            December 12, 2012
            4108 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: April 25, 2015, 11:12 am - IP Logged

            Life Rule One: "If you have won something or if something is advertised as 'free', then you should not have to pay ANYTHING up front. Not even 1 cent, not even the cost of a postage stamp, no credit card or bank account information, NOTHING up front. Period. No exceptions."

            Life Rule Two: "Treat ALL unsolicited phone calls and ALL unsolicited emails as scams because they probably ARE SCAMS."

            ......And  " If you did NOT enter a contest- You did NOT win ".

            ..And if " they " insist that l have won & must send money,  my response is l authorize them to " Take the shipping and handling charges or whatever amount from my winnings & SEND the rest to me"..

            People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it- George Bernard Shaw.

              music*'s avatar - nw bookeep.jpg
              Happy California
              United States
              Member #157856
              August 2, 2014
              1520 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: April 25, 2015, 1:26 pm - IP Logged

               Senior citizens can be as trusting as children. They must be protected as such.  Family and friends must keep watch over them. Even hire professional help. Of course check out the backgrounds of the new hires.Blue Angel

                mypiemaster's avatar - 2015021003pileofcash
                JACKPOT HUNTER

                United States
                Member #141034
                April 2, 2013
                1408 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: April 25, 2015, 2:23 pm - IP Logged

                I don't know how people keep falling for these cons. Angry

                My sentiments exactly. But these guys are  called con artists because they target the lowest hanging fruits and the most vulnerable in society. Shame on them!!!.

                Seek and ye shall find -Matt. 7:7 ...Ask and ye shall receive -John 16:24 ...Give and it shall be given unto you -Luke 6:38 ...Be careful what you ask for!!! -Mypiemaster 1:1

                Having Money Solves Problems That Not Having Money Creates Yes Nod ****John Carlton****

                  duckman's avatar - ducklogodrake64x64
                  Jacksonville Florida
                  United States
                  Member #23018
                  October 6, 2005
                  918 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: April 25, 2015, 2:48 pm - IP Logged

                  My sentiments exactly. But these guys are  called con artists because they target the lowest hanging fruits and the most vulnerable in society. Shame on them!!!.

                  Yes, these con artists know no boundaries. I run a lost and found pet Facebook page and they will contact someone who has lost a pet and claim to have their pet. They will say the pet is injured and needs immediate vet care and that they need money now. Some will go so far as to say they will kill your pet if you don't send money. Of course, they don't really have the pet, but they prey upon the emotional state of the pet's owner...

                    Bondi Junction
                    Australia
                    Member #57242
                    December 24, 2007
                    1102 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: April 25, 2015, 5:16 pm - IP Logged

                    A Rochester, New York, man has been accused of running a lottery con game in which three senior citizens were persuaded to send him a total of $138,000 in order to claim their mega-bucks winnings.

                    The winnings were fictitious but the crime was real, federal prosecutors say: Roydel Nicholson was charged Friday with mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering in connection with the scheme, which he allegedly ran from his apartment on Van Auker Street.

                    A criminal complaint unsealed in U.S. District Court Friday accused the 62-year-old Nicholson of taking advantage of two elderly men in California and a senior woman in Detroit beginning in 2011 and 2012.

                    Nicholson or associates called each of the three victims and told them they had won millions of dollars in a lottery. To obtain their winnings, which in one case also included a BMW automobile, the victims were told to send money to Nicholson in Rochester. The funds ostensibly were to cover taxes, transportation costs and various fees.

                    It's the same type of scheme featured in unsolicited emails that jam many people's in-boxes, though the Federal Trade Commission warns they can be attempted via telephone as well and often target elderly people, who can be more trusting.

                    The complaint doesn't specify how the three alleged victims in Nicholson's case were first contacted, though it does describe repeated phone calls to them.

                    A 74-year-old man in Cottonwood, California, identified as R.B., who reportedly had been swindled in lottery scams before, was persuaded to send Nicholson an $8,000 check, the complaint states. A woman in Detroit, P.B., age 77, sent him three payments totaling $2,099.

                    And H.J., a 94-year-old man living in Paradise, California, wound up sending cash or cashier's checks to Nicholson's apartment 17 different times. The payments added up to at least $128,294, according to the complaint.

                    After being asked for another $14,446 in April 2014, H.J. asked for his money back. Someone identified by federal investigators as Nicholson responded in an August letter saying he couldn't refund the money because someone else had been handling the transactions.

                    Most of the proceeds of the alleged con were wired by Nicholson to various parties in Jamaica, according the complaint. Nicholson, who authorities said was a native of Jamaica and a legal permanent resident of this country, kept about $13,800 for himself.

                    The case was investigation by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

                    If legal lotteries did not exist, we would have more scams like this one!

                    We all get a lot out of lotteries!

                      dpoly1's avatar - driver
                      PA
                      United States
                      Member #66141
                      October 16, 2008
                      1672 Posts
                      Offline
                      Posted: April 25, 2015, 7:58 pm - IP Logged

                      A CON MAN FROM NY

                      WHODATHUNKIT!

                      dpoly1 - Playing the lottery to save the jobs of those that build, transport, sell & maintain luxury items! -

                       

                      Eschew Poverty ........... Vote Conservative!

                        Technut's avatar - moon
                        3rd Rock from Sun
                        United States
                        Member #159103
                        September 13, 2014
                        151 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: April 26, 2015, 11:31 am - IP Logged

                        i hope this scumbucket gets LIFE in prison then once they find out what he did then he will get shafted too.

                        Yesterday is History, Tomorrow is a Mystery, Today is a gift that's why it's called the PRESENT! (c8

                          dallascowboyfan's avatar - tiana the-princess-and-the-frog.jpg
                          Oklahoma
                          United States
                          Member #82391
                          November 12, 2009
                          6290 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: April 26, 2015, 11:59 am - IP Logged

                           Senior citizens can be as trusting as children. They must be protected as such.  Family and friends must keep watch over them. Even hire professional help. Of course check out the backgrounds of the new hires.Blue Angel

                          Agree!!!

                          I Love Pink & Green 1908