Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 2, 2016, 2:44 pm
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Lottery officials say identifying winners a must

Topic closed. 59 replies. Last post 10 months ago by sirbrad.

Page 2 of 4
4.33
PrintE-mailLink
Romancandle's avatar - moon
Upacreek
United States
Member #136306
December 8, 2012
428 Posts
Offline
Posted: January 19, 2016, 7:45 pm - IP Logged

I wonder if any of the folks in this forum who vehmently oppose anomomity have actually won a multi million dollar jackpot?

As far as I'm concerned, only those folks that have won such jackpots would know what it's like.

The rest are just opinions.

-RC

    TheGameGrl's avatar - character catafly.jpg
    A long and winding road
    United States
    Member #17084
    June 10, 2005
    4521 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: January 19, 2016, 7:56 pm - IP Logged

    I wonder if any of the folks in this forum who vehmently oppose anomomity have actually won a multi million dollar jackpot?

    As far as I'm concerned, only those folks that have won such jackpots would know what it's like.

    The rest are just opinions.

    well wonder no more. A person doesn't need to be a doctor to say they have a belly ache. So there goes that theory of only a jackpot winner can speak the truth or air an opinion on anonimity.

    If you've nothing to hide , then come forth. I believe in showing your cards. Life is too short to be otherwise.

    ~~Is it true, Is it kind,Is it necessary. ~~~

     Thanks be to the giving numbers: 1621,912,119 02014

      Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
      Zeta Reticuli Star System
      United States
      Member #30470
      January 17, 2006
      10344 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: January 19, 2016, 8:30 pm - IP Logged

      What do these officials have to say to states and countries that allow winners to remain anonymous?

      Kind of throws their whole argument right out the window.

      Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any.

      Lep

      There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

        Romancandle's avatar - moon
        Upacreek
        United States
        Member #136306
        December 8, 2012
        428 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: January 19, 2016, 8:31 pm - IP Logged

        well wonder no more. A person doesn't need to be a doctor to say they have a belly ache. So there goes that theory of only a jackpot winner can speak the truth or air an opinion on anonimity.

        If you've nothing to hide , then come forth. I believe in showing your cards. Life is too short to be otherwise.

        Thanks TheGameGrl- I will wonder no more LOL

        -RC

          travelintrucker's avatar - morph
          Greenville, SC
          United States
          Member #169870
          November 4, 2015
          374 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: January 19, 2016, 9:02 pm - IP Logged

          There's 7 anonymous states. Delaware, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina, and Wyoming.

          May the balls bounce in your favor!

            travelintrucker's avatar - morph
            Greenville, SC
            United States
            Member #169870
            November 4, 2015
            374 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: January 19, 2016, 9:04 pm - IP Logged

            I'm VERY surprised that they don't tax lottery winnings.

            May the balls bounce in your favor!

              travelintrucker's avatar - morph
              Greenville, SC
              United States
              Member #169870
              November 4, 2015
              374 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: January 19, 2016, 9:07 pm - IP Logged

              I don't think most people are hiding anything. They want to protect their way of life. Or don't want everyone coming out of the woodwork to ask for cash.

              May the balls bounce in your favor!

                Romancandle's avatar - moon
                Upacreek
                United States
                Member #136306
                December 8, 2012
                428 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: January 19, 2016, 9:13 pm - IP Logged

                I don't think most people are hiding anything. They want to protect their way of life. Or don't want everyone coming out of the woodwork to ask for cash.

                I'm sure the last thing on every anonymous multi million $ winner's mind while on their deathbed is the deep regret for not having a huge press conference.

                -RC

                  savagegoose's avatar - ProfilePho
                  adelaide sa
                  Australia
                  Member #37136
                  April 11, 2006
                  3300 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: January 19, 2016, 9:34 pm - IP Logged

                  Ca cant guarantee that their workers wont  corrupt and commit fraud to gain the winnings. so they need to keep track of who's claiming

                  2014 = -1016; 2015= -1409; 2016 JAN = -106; FEB= -81; MAR= -131; APR= - 87: MAY= -91; JUN= -39; JUL=-134; AUG= -124; SEP = -123; OCT= -84  NOV=- 73 TOT= -3498

                  keno historic = -2291 ; 2015= -603; 2016= JAN=-32, FEB= +12 , MAR= -86, APR = -77. MAY= -48, JUN= -29, JUL=-71; AUG = -52; SEPT= -43; OCT = +56 NOV = -33 TOT= -3297

                    larry3100's avatar - larry icon2.jpg
                    Redwood City,California
                    United States
                    Member #70503
                    February 3, 2009
                    200 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: January 19, 2016, 11:21 pm - IP Logged

                    If I won a big jackpot in the lottery, the first thing I would do is get security protection for myself and family. After that, get out of Dodge City, where unscrupulous persons that want my money, come knocking on my door. Sure, I'll get my fifteen minutes of fame, like anyone else that wins in the lottery, that's it, said and done.

                      Avatar
                      Kentucky
                      United States
                      Member #32652
                      February 14, 2006
                      7295 Posts
                      Online
                      Posted: January 19, 2016, 11:35 pm - IP Logged

                      I wonder if any of the folks in this forum who vehmently oppose anomomity have actually won a multi million dollar jackpot?

                      As far as I'm concerned, only those folks that have won such jackpots would know what it's like.

                      The rest are just opinions.

                      There are 30 NBA teams and every team has several players making over $1 million a year and several college coaches have 7 figure salaries too. Add to that other sports teams, golfers, team owners and business owners. Some of the people in this forum are gulible enough to believe lottery winners would be targeted more than any other group of millionaires by simple answering a bunch of stupid questions at press conference. I've always wondered what lottery winners have to hide.

                      IMO, the TN winners killed two birds with one stone by appearing on the Today Show. Do you think they will be in more danger than a basketball player that just signed a $100 million multi year contract?

                        Avatar
                        md
                        United States
                        Member #14047
                        April 20, 2005
                        579 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: January 20, 2016, 12:17 am - IP Logged

                        I'm so glad that I live in a state where anonymity is the law.  Especially with a huge Jackpot like we just witnessed.  Thats not only for my safety, but for my loved one's safty and peace of mind. There is a difference between 15 minutes of fame and the constant harrassment and stalking that would take place. And yes security would be a major priority, with anonymity or 15 minutes of fame. I understand that everyone is entitled to their own opinions and choices. Im down for anonymity!!!!!!!!!!

                          MaximumMillions's avatar - Lottery-013.jpg

                          Germany
                          Member #164603
                          March 8, 2015
                          599 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: January 20, 2016, 12:23 am - IP Logged

                          well wonder no more. A person doesn't need to be a doctor to say they have a belly ache. So there goes that theory of only a jackpot winner can speak the truth or air an opinion on anonimity.

                          If you've nothing to hide , then come forth. I believe in showing your cards. Life is too short to be otherwise.

                          "If you've nothing to hide , then come forth."

                          A quote commonly attributed to Joseph Goebbels. So there's that.

                            Avatar

                            United States
                            Member #171275
                            January 5, 2016
                            105 Posts
                            Offline
                            Posted: January 20, 2016, 3:25 am - IP Logged

                            There's 7 anonymous states. Delaware, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina, and Wyoming.

                            I thought it was six? All those you mentioned accept for Wyoming.  At least that's what I've heard for awhile. Wyoming's website says you can remain anonymous.  Please check it out under the website's FAQ.

                              Bondi Junction
                              Australia
                              Member #57242
                              December 24, 2007
                              1102 Posts
                              Offline
                              Posted: January 20, 2016, 5:48 am - IP Logged

                              States wrestle with winners' privacy vs. integrity of games

                              In the California lottery handbook for winners, officials offer a few suggestions to newly minted millionaires. Change your number. Stop answering your phone. And find a reputable financial adviser.

                              That's because along with the money comes 15 minutes of fame as the names of winners are required to be made public in California and many other states.

                              All eyes are on the Los Angeles suburb of Chino Hills, where one of three tickets in Wednesday night's record-breaking $1.6 billion Powerball drawing was purchased. No one has come forward to claim the prize in California.

                              "We're waiting for who this person is," said Alex Traverso, a spokesman for the California Lottery.

                              Traverso said large jackpots like the one in Wednesday's drawing drive debate over whether the names of lottery winners should be made public. Past winners have complained of being besieged by con artists and swindled by friends.

                              Millionaire slain

                              Critics of the disclosure laws often point to the case of Abraham Shakespeare, who won $30 million in the Florida lottery in 2006, and three years later, was killed by a woman who managed his winnings. (See Woman found guilty of murder in lottery winner's death, Lottery Post, Dec. 11, 2012.)

                              Andrew Stoltmann, an Illinois attorney who has represented winners, told the Associated Press that making winners' names public is like "throwing meat into a shark-infested ocean."

                              But lottery officials say it's important public information to ensure the drawings are transparent and to deter would-be cheaters.

                              "We want people to know we have winners every day," Traverso said. "If people don't see people winning the lottery, then they won't buy tickets. ... The only time we hear talk of changing the regulations to allow anonymity is when we have jackpots like (Wednesday's)."

                              Besides Chino Hills, the two other winning Powerball tickets were purchased in Munford, Tenn., and Melbourne Beach, Fla. A Tennessee couple, John and Lisa Robinson, announced on the "Today" show on Friday that they were the winners from their state.

                              Tennessee lottery officials later confirmed the couple were the winners in an afternoon news conference. The family plans to take a lump sum payout of $327 million. (See Tennessee couple claims share of $1.6 billion Powerball jackpot, Lottery Post, Jan. 15, 2016.)

                              Showed ticket on TV

                              John Robinson, who pulled the winning ticket from his shirt pocket on the "Today" show, said he realized he was losing his anonymity after the announcement.

                              "Now I'll be nervous because everybody knows," he said on the broadcast.

                              (See Lottery veterans question Tennessee family's behavior before claiming Powerball winnings, Lottery Post, Jan. 16, 2016.)

                              All three states with winning Powerball tickets have laws requiring the identity of the winner to be made public. In Tennessee and Florida, the states' lottery policy is to identify a person's name and city of residence.

                              California requires that a person's name be made public, but not their city. Lottery officials include the person's name, where the ticket was purchased and how much was won in press releases.

                              "You aren't compelled to do a press conference or have your picture taken, but we are going to release your name because it's public information," Traverso said. "We want people to know the lottery is creating winners, and we want to be sensitive to our winners that they may not want their details thrown out there to the world."

                              California has required that the names of winners be made public since voters first passed Proposition 37, also known as the California State Lottery Act, in 1984. Changing the antianonymity law would require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature and approval of the governor.

                              Only six states allow lottery winners to remain anonymous — Delaware, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio and South Carolina. Some states allow winners to shield their identity by claiming their winnings through a trust or a limited liability company.

                              No anonymity in state

                              In recent years, several states have considered changing their laws to allow for winners to protect their identity. California lawmakers have not taken up the issue — and with good reason, said Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco.

                              "Winners need to be public so the public has faith in the lottery," Ting said. "Beneficiary anonymity cannot overshadow governmental accountability to the public."

                              Six states — Delaware, Kansas, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio and South Carolina — allow winners to remain anonymous.

                               

                              nbcnews.com/news/us-news/can-you-spare-million-why-it-pays-stay-anonymous-after-n70071

                              We all get a lot out of lotteries!