Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 4, 2016, 5:20 pm
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Alabama lottery vote manuevering fractures Republican caucus

AlabamaAlabama: Alabama lottery vote manuevering fractures Republican caucus
51
Rating:

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Two senators have resigned from the Senate Republican Caucus in the wake of last week's vote to approve a statewide lottery, citing policy differences and claiming senate leaders violated their own rules in an effort to muscle the bill through.

The bill, which was approved by a margin of 21-12, would send $100 million of lottery revenue each year to Medicaid, which is facing a $70 million shortfall this year, with the rest going to the General Fund.

The bill endured a filibuster on the senate floor, which requires a three-fifths vote (21 of 35 senators) to "cloture," or end.

Republicans have a long-standing agreement not to cloture each other, but as the caucus grew (there are currently 27 Republican senators), senate leaders knew it would become more difficult to avoid splintering on some divisive issues. As a result, the Senate Republican Caucus adopted a rule stipulating that Republicans could not cloture one of their own without 21 Republicans banding together to do it.

The rule had not been tested to this point, but as conservative lawmakers continued filibustering the lottery, Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston) moved to end the debate by circulating a "cloture petition." The petition received enough signatures to break the filibuster, but it did not have the 21 Republican signatures required under the GOP caucus rules.

However, since caucus rules are not binding for the full body — they are more akin to gentlemen's agreements — the decision was made to push forward to pass the lottery bill. Not all members of Senate leadership supported the move; Senate Majority Leader Greg Reed (R-Jasper) did not sign the cloture petition.

But as a result of the way the vote was handled, Sen. Paul Bussman (R-Cullman) announced he is resigning from the Republican caucus effectively immediately, and released the following statement:

As a Republican, I have strongly support the Republican mission of fiscal responsibility, limited government and personal freedom. I am a proud member of the Republican Party and will remain a proud member of the GOP. However as of Monday, I will no longer affiliate with the Senate majority caucus. In order for the Alabama Senate to operate fairly, we have a set rules by which all members must abide. In both the Republican and Democrat caucuses, there are also rules that apply. This organized process is crucial to a fair and transparent government. It is when these rules are not followed that the breakdown of the system occurs.

The process broke down last week when these rules were violated. These rules cannot be used when convenient and discarded when it is inconvenient. This is not about me. This is not about a lottery. This is about who controls the government of Alabama. Do the people control the government or is it still the back room deals and special interest groups that continue to control the state? I can no longer sit back and ignore the actions of the Alabama Senate Republican Caucus leadership, which are misguided, unequally applied, punitive and divisive. As a result, the Caucus has made a significant shift in priorities since 2010. In order for us to be successful in Alabama, we cannot return to the old ways of doing business. We are expected to do better and we must do better.
This is not Sen. Bussman's first run-in with Senate leadership. He was stripped of his vice-chairmanship of the powerful Senate Rules Committee earlier this year for a previous dispute.

Senator Dick Brewbaker (R-Montgomery) also announced he is exiting the Senate Republican caucus, echoing Sen. Bussman's concern over the rules and telling the Montgomery Advertiser, "If you're going to be in a political group, you need to make sure you share political priorities."

Both senators have expressed concerns about the GOP-controlled legislature not being as committed to limited government reforms as it once was.

A request for comment from Sen. Del Marsh's was not immediately returned.

Yellow Hammer

We'd love to see your comments here!  Register for a FREE membership — it takes just a few moments — and you'll be able to post comments here and on any of our forums. If you're already a member, you can Log In to post a comment.

5 comments. Last comment 3 months ago by LottoAce.
Page 1 of 1
Avatar
South Carolina
United States
Member #18322
July 9, 2005
1704 Posts
Offline
Posted: August 24, 2016, 11:36 am - IP Logged

From Webster's Online Dictionary:

Definition of cloture :

  1. :  the closing or limitation of debate in a legislative body especially by calling for a vote.

 

 ".... the Senate Republican Caucus adopted a rule stipulating that Republicans could not cloture one of their own without 21 Republicans banding together to do it.  ......  Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston) moved to end the debate by circulating a "cloture petition." The petition received enough signatures to break the filibuster, but it did not have the 21 Republican signatures required under the GOP caucus rules.  .....  since caucus rules are not binding for the full body — they are more akin to gentlemen's agreements — the decision was made to push forward to pass the lottery bill [through the Senate]. " 

........... But it failed to pass in the House

So the Alabama Senate slightly twisted their own procedural rules to push the Lottery Bill through the Senate [in the Best Interests of the People of the State of Alabama].  But the Alabama House of Representatives did NOT. WHY NOT ??? First of all, Politicians ALWAYS Spin the Rules Around, when they see fit to do so, in an effort to strategize to make something work out the way that they want it to.  STRATEGY is  the DEFINITION of POLITICS

Thus, exactly WHY didn't the Alabama House of Representatives want to send this Lottery Bill to the Voters in November 2016 ??? 

.... The other Alabama News Story said it was because they didn't want more Democrats turning out to vote in November 2016, b/c it might cause an upset in the Republican controlled House, and some Republicans might lose their seats.

    Avatar
    South Carolina
    United States
    Member #18322
    July 9, 2005
    1704 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: August 24, 2016, 12:04 pm - IP Logged

    From Webster's Online Dictionary:

    Definition of cloture :

    1. :  the closing or limitation of debate in a legislative body especially by calling for a vote.

     

     ".... the Senate Republican Caucus adopted a rule stipulating that Republicans could not cloture one of their own without 21 Republicans banding together to do it.  ......  Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston) moved to end the debate by circulating a "cloture petition." The petition received enough signatures to break the filibuster, but it did not have the 21 Republican signatures required under the GOP caucus rules.  .....  since caucus rules are not binding for the full body — they are more akin to gentlemen's agreements — the decision was made to push forward to pass the lottery bill [through the Senate]. " 

    ........... But it failed to pass in the House

    So the Alabama Senate slightly twisted their own procedural rules to push the Lottery Bill through the Senate [in the Best Interests of the People of the State of Alabama].  But the Alabama House of Representatives did NOT. WHY NOT ??? First of all, Politicians ALWAYS Spin the Rules Around, when they see fit to do so, in an effort to strategize to make something work out the way that they want it to.  STRATEGY is  the DEFINITION of POLITICS

    Thus, exactly WHY didn't the Alabama House of Representatives want to send this Lottery Bill to the Voters in November 2016 ??? 

    .... The other Alabama News Story said it was because they didn't want more Democrats turning out to vote in November 2016, b/c it might cause an upset in the Republican controlled House, and some Republicans might lose their seats.

    Do we really care that 2 Republican Senators resigned from the Alabama Republican Caucus, b/c procedure wasn't followed on a Bill that they probably opposed anyway ???  No, we don't careLet them LEAVE.

    This is the hypocrisy and irony of it all.  It's OK for procedure to be twisted when you support certain legislation, but NOT OK for procedure to be altered when you DON'T support certain legislation.

      grwurston's avatar - Cute animals_Spider.jpg
      Winning makes me smile.
      bel air maryland
      United States
      Member #90251
      April 24, 2010
      4855 Posts
      Online
      Posted: August 24, 2016, 5:04 pm - IP Logged

      There are two rules for being a politician.

      Rule #1)  When you're a politician, getting re-elected is job 1.

      Rule #2)  If people want you to do the job you were elected to do, see Rule #1.

      "You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra, Hall of Fame baseball player.

      The numbers will tell you what numbers to play. Pay attention to the numbers.

      Don't just think outside the box, crush it.

        mikeintexas's avatar - tx avatar-1.gif
        Texas Panhandle
        United States
        Member #136843
        December 20, 2012
        1266 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: August 24, 2016, 5:32 pm - IP Logged

        Definition of a politician:  Someone who can be bought.

        Definition of a good politician: Someone, when bought, stays bought.

          LottoAce's avatar - WWI Flying_Ace.gif
          N.C.
          United States
          Member #56005
          October 28, 2007
          829 Posts
          Online
          Posted: August 24, 2016, 7:13 pm - IP Logged

          Definition of a politician:  Someone who can be bought.

          Definition of a good politician: Someone, when bought, stays bought.

          I like that...lol

          "know your limitations, but excede your expectations"