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77-year-old crossing guard with winning $1M lottery ticket will keep working

Topic closed. 19 replies. Last post 3 years ago by DELotteryPlyr.

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United States
Member #106919
February 27, 2011
556 Posts
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Watcha talking about Willis? ????? It say what in what application?

I believe the reference is the "at will employee" clause, a labor law for contractual relationships in which an employee can be dismissed by an employer for any reason without "just cause", and without warning.  However, my opinion is this reservation would not trump a provable discriminatory action by an employer against an employee, especially in California.

  I'm feeling a $312,000,000.00 jackpot win coming my way!

    eddessaknight's avatar - nw paladin.jpg
    LAS VEGAS
    United States
    Member #47728
    November 22, 2006
    7166 Posts
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    I agree. Anyway after taxes, he will have $300,000 or so. He is hardly going to create a disruption in the workplace. Now if he won $500 million plus, it might be a risk for him. I could see some nut saying I 'll abduct this child by you, unless you pay me x dollars. It does not mean the criminal would get away with it, but he would have to find another location to try to anonymously work as a crossing guard. He would become a target otherwise.

    Artist, entre nous, your reasoning makes sense-

     

    "The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new."    -  Socrates

     

    Bonne Chance-

    Eddessa_Knight 

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      Wyomissing, PA
      United States
      Member #161045
      November 15, 2014
      481 Posts
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      Congrats on his win. I doubt he will have any issues continuing to work. He didn't win $1 million, but rather $536,227. Advertising jackpots that aren't immediately payable in the full amount (ie. annuity) is very deceptive marketing. Though it used to be worse decades ago.

      After much negative press, most lotteries, usually in fine print and/or in the official rules, indicate the cash value along with offering a lump-sum payout option. Even better, many lotteries have moved to all cash jackpots for their various in-state games, but I digress.

      If the amount was many millions, maybe he would face issues at work. Though, even then, likely not, since he's a crossing guard working alone outside verses a teacher working aside many others in a closed space. Many large jackpot winners who work in a more traditional workplace are eventually forced out. They become a distraction, their performance may be different (money does change people), safety issues, and likely the biggest reason, the egos of management.

        Artist77's avatar - batman14

        United States
        Member #121741
        January 16, 2012
        7639 Posts
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        I believe the reference is the "at will employee" clause, a labor law for contractual relationships in which an employee can be dismissed by an employer for any reason without "just cause", and without warning.  However, my opinion is this reservation would not trump a provable discriminatory action by an employer against an employee, especially in California.

        Very true.

        Je vous salue, Marie, pleine de grace.  We will rebuild!

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          Maryland
          United States
          Member #162429
          January 2, 2015
          2255 Posts
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          Congrats on his win. I doubt he will have any issues continuing to work. He didn't win $1 million, but rather $536,227. Advertising jackpots that aren't immediately payable in the full amount (ie. annuity) is very deceptive marketing. Though it used to be worse decades ago.

          After much negative press, most lotteries, usually in fine print and/or in the official rules, indicate the cash value along with offering a lump-sum payout option. Even better, many lotteries have moved to all cash jackpots for their various in-state games, but I digress.

          If the amount was many millions, maybe he would face issues at work. Though, even then, likely not, since he's a crossing guard working alone outside verses a teacher working aside many others in a closed space. Many large jackpot winners who work in a more traditional workplace are eventually forced out. They become a distraction, their performance may be different (money does change people), safety issues, and likely the biggest reason, the egos of management.

          I agree, most people will just congratulate him on the win.