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convicted felons and lottery winnings

Topic closed. 53 replies. Last post 10 years ago by TheGameGrl.

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should a convicted felon be allowed to cash in lottery winning?

yes [ 49 ]  [64.47%]
no [ 22 ]  [28.95%]
not sure [ 5 ]  [6.58%]
Total Valid Votes [ 76 ]  
Discarded Votes [ 9 ]  
justxploring's avatar - villiarna
Wandering Aimlessly
United States
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November 5, 2005
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Posted: July 9, 2006, 8:06 pm - IP Logged

"Murderers, according to friends I have in the Amarillo guard force, are some of the finest and most trustworthy people in the joint." 

Please tell me you typed that tongue-in-cheek! I started to rant until I realized you must have written the above comment facetiously, because calling a murderer a model prisoner is like...I can't use the words on this board. Grrrr.  Consider the source.  If you wandered into a quarantined ward for people with contagious diseases and someone told you that the group with the ebola virus is a lot safer to be around than the folks with that flesh eating bacteria, where would you choose to bunk? Of course, getting sick wasn't their fault in the first place.  Hmm. Guess getting a disease is the same as being a murderer then. After all, it's just circumstantial.  Dennis Rader said a demon got inside him and made him torture all those people. So he's not really guilty, right? The Devil made him do it!

I believe anyone can be a murderer under the proper circumstances. 

Puhleeeze!!  There's nothing proper about murder.  Self-defense, protecting your country and your family...not murder.  Taking a human life out of lust, greed, anger..murder.   In fact, one of the most ridiculous charges in our legal system is attempted murder.  "Well, Mr. Smith, you're lucky when you stabbed your neighbor 15 times in the gut and chest he didn't die, because now we're rewarding you with a shorter prison sentence. Aren't cha just tickled he pulled through? He'll eat through a tube and poop through a bag the rest of his life, and who knows if he'll ever get out of that wheelchair, but I'll be darned..he made it! So good for you!"

"A majority of murderers are model prisoners."

"Gee, Mrs. Jones. I'm sorry that your husband died when Bob here went a little ballistic and shot everyone in the office. He was having a bad day. He woke up with a headache and then his car didn't start. By the time he got to work and found out he didn't get his promotion, he was so tense he just didn't have time to think before he snapped and pulled out his shotgun. However, he's been a fine and upstanding young man here at Sing Sing. So the parole board has voted that he's ready to go back into society and, for being such a model prisoner, we're going to reward him with $20 million so next time he destroys a few lives, he can hire a better lawyer. Too bad Johnnie Cochran is dead."

    truecritic's avatar - PirateTreasure
    Michigan
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    September 24, 2005
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    Posted: July 9, 2006, 8:31 pm - IP Logged

    justxploring

    Just heard it on TV tonite...a man in NY was convicted of 2nd degree murder. So he will be serving "hard time" although he wasn't baking cookies prior to killing the person, he was just "a guy." So how did he become a murderer? Drunk driving.

    And there are many cases such as this one. It doesn't mean a person has to be a hit man or part of a gang to kill someone. They all get thrown into the same prisons.

    That's not support for murder or drunk driving but it does illustrate a possible situation of a normal person being convicted of murder.

      justxploring's avatar - villiarna
      Wandering Aimlessly
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      Posted: July 9, 2006, 9:03 pm - IP Logged

      I'm really not trying to be argumentative, since you can tell from one of my previous posts that I do believe there are different classes of criminal behavior. However, let's say that person who drove a car into a crowd on July 4th at a boat race in Indiana was drunk. (I haven't followed up on that story.) Are the people he killed and maimed any less dead or crippled than if he had angrily driven his car into a crowd of onlookers just for the heck of it?

      Well, it's 9 so it's time for Law & Order CI, probably a rerun.  I love all the Law & Order shows and I'm much more open-minded and "Liberal" (gasp!) than I sound. But sometimes a mind can be too open and then your brain starts to fall out. To me, taking a life under any circumstance is something that should be taken very seriously. Otherwise, everyone will start making up excuses.

        truecritic's avatar - PirateTreasure
        Michigan
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        Posted: July 9, 2006, 9:25 pm - IP Logged

        I'm really not trying to be argumentative, since you can tell from one of my previous posts that I do believe there are different classes of criminal behavior. However, let's say that person who drove a car into a crowd on July 4th at a boat race in Indiana was drunk. (I haven't followed up on that story.) Are the people he killed and maimed any less dead

        No argument - I understand you (or at least I think I do).

        Not sure you understood my explanation.  Of course dead by any means is dead.  But a "normal" person, such as yourself, could be driving along and accidently not see someone.  If you get charged with murder and end up in prison, I do believe you will still be the fine person you were previous to the accident.  And I believe that statement by Orangeman would then apply to you.  You would be some of the finest and most trustworthy people in the joint.  I would happily choose to bunk with you---> (where would you choose to bunk?)  (LOL)

        Now if you are talking Jeffrey Dalmer types, gangs, people that intentionally commit murder - especially serial murder, then I totally agree with your previous statements. 

          Avatar
          Amarillo/Austin
          United States
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          April 25, 2003
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          Posted: July 9, 2006, 10:21 pm - IP Logged

          A friend of mine was in charge of the  food service for the prison system in Angola, Louisiana.  He was NOT a prisoner, by the way.  He worked for a company that serviced the prison system down there. Part of his job was to hire kitchen help and that is what he told me.  His statements surprised me, too.

          Like I said, the decision to withhold lottery winnings should be made on a case by case basis.  We have so many former prisoners in the American population that we need to consider these issues rationally.  Naturally, we wouldn't treat a serial killer the same as someone who killed his wife in a fit of passion when he caught her in bed with the next door neighbor. 

          Stuff happens.

          Orangeman                                                                          Evil Looking

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            New Mexico
            United States
            Member #12305
            March 10, 2005
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            Posted: July 9, 2006, 10:49 pm - IP Logged

            I'm really not trying to be argumentative, since you can tell from one of my previous posts that I do believe there are different classes of criminal behavior. However, let's say that person who drove a car into a crowd on July 4th at a boat race in Indiana was drunk. (I haven't followed up on that story.) Are the people he killed and maimed any less dead or crippled than if he had angrily driven his car into a crowd of onlookers just for the heck of it?

            Well, it's 9 so it's time for Law & Order CI, probably a rerun.  I love all the Law & Order shows and I'm much more open-minded and "Liberal" (gasp!) than I sound. But sometimes a mind can be too open and then your brain starts to fall out. To me, taking a life under any circumstance is something that should be taken very seriously. Otherwise, everyone will start making up excuses.

            Justx:

            In 1964, I was arrested riding a freight-car in Rochester, NY.  Hoboing.  I had no idea it was a felony.  Spent some time in jail and was eventually released, but it could have easily gone the other way.  I had the right skin color, was wearing a University of New Mexico sweatshirt, which was a novelty in those days.... judge got conversational and I good-old-boyed him enough so they turned me loose with a warning.

            But I could have just as easily spent the last 40 years as a convicted felon.

            I've known and been close friends with a lot of convicted felons over the years.  Some were quality people, others I've known were explosions waiting to happen.  One was a young man with a nosy landlord, went in while he wasn't there and found some mushrooms he was growing in his closet (for his own use).  Wham.  Convicted felon.

            Being a convicted felon doesn't say much about a person these days, though I've worked in places where we had them doing cleanup work and whatnot.  My general impression about them was that the quality of people who are convicted felons has gone down a middling amount, same as it has among the rest of the population.

            But it's plenty difficult enough for them when they get out of the slammer without trying to find ways to make it more difficult, seems to me.

            As for taking lives, an old-time judge in New Mexico once told a horse-thief he sentenced to hang after turning loose a killer who'd killed a man slapped his wife around trying to rape her,

            "There are men who need killing, but there aren't any horses that need stealing."

            There are still men who need killing and it's a felony to kill them.

            J

            Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

            It's about number behavior.

            Egos don't count.

             

            Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

             

              justxploring's avatar - villiarna
              Wandering Aimlessly
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              Posted: July 10, 2006, 12:56 am - IP Logged

              I just typed a long post to answer all 3 of you and then I deleted it. This isn't my board and I don't want to abuse it to express my personal and political viewpoints. I had no idea the last post was so long until I hit "post reply." I am being misunderstood here, however.  I never said that all felons were the same if you read my first post on this thread. In fact, I got my hands slapped for saying there were different classes of crime.  One thing I will argue is that a drunk driver who kills someone is not an innocent victim of circumstance. He/she is guilty of handling a dangerous weapon and should be held accountable. Maybe when people get scared enough because they read about these murder convictions, 20,000+ lives won't be lost every year because everyone finds getting drunk socially acceptable. I have nothing but compassion for people with alcohol and drug addiction, but when we get up in the morning we make choices and those choices not only affect our lives, but those who live and work around us.

              BTW, this thread is about felons and the lottery. I already said as long as they weren't still in prison serving time they should be able to collect lottery prizes. I do think if they owe money to their victims, they should pay restitution. That being said, what's the cost of a human life? I honestly don't know how I'd feel if a loved one was shot to death during a store robbery and then I read that he was living in a mansion and driving a Porsche. So maybe I shouldn't have participated in this poll.

                Avatar
                New Mexico
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                Posted: July 10, 2006, 1:14 am - IP Logged

                I just typed a long post to answer all 3 of you and then I deleted it. This isn't my board and I don't want to abuse it to express my personal and political viewpoints. I had no idea the last post was so long until I hit "post reply." I am being misunderstood here, however.  I never said that all felons were the same if you read my first post on this thread. In fact, I got my hands slapped for saying there were different classes of crime.  One thing I will argue is that a drunk driver who kills someone is not an innocent victim of circumstance. He/she is guilty of handling a dangerous weapon and should be held accountable. Maybe when people get scared enough because they read about these murder convictions, 20,000+ lives won't be lost every year because everyone finds getting drunk socially acceptable. I have nothing but compassion for people with alcohol and drug addiction, but when we get up in the morning we make choices and those choices not only affect our lives, but those who live and work around us.

                BTW, this thread is about felons and the lottery. I already said as long as they weren't still in prison serving time they should be able to collect lottery prizes. I do think if they owe money to their victims, they should pay restitution. That being said, what's the cost of a human life? I honestly don't know how I'd feel if a loved one was shot to death during a store robbery and then I read that he was living in a mansion and driving a Porsche. So maybe I shouldn't have participated in this poll.

                JustX:

                I'm sorry you deleted it.  That's one I'd definitely have liked to read.

                J

                Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                It's about number behavior.

                Egos don't count.

                 

                Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                 

                  BaristaExpress's avatar - BaristaExpressMX zpsfb0d8b5d.png
                  Magnolia, Delaware
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                  Posted: July 10, 2006, 7:54 pm - IP Logged

                  Mmm that's like saying that a felon that has done his time should have the right to vote restored! I don't think so! So with that said, No they shouldn't be able to collect a big multi million dollar jackpot like MM or PB! Dang only god knows with that much money at hand what it would finance! I shutter at the thought.

                  Keep dreaming the impossible dream, it just may come true! Thumbs Up

                    Avatar
                    New Mexico
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                    Posted: July 10, 2006, 8:15 pm - IP Logged

                    Mmm that's like saying that a felon that has done his time should have the right to vote restored! I don't think so! So with that said, No they shouldn't be able to collect a big multi million dollar jackpot like MM or PB! Dang only god knows with that much money at hand what it would finance! I shutter at the thought.

                    Mmm that's like saying that a felon that has done his time should have the right to vote restored!

                     Actually, it ain't even remotely akin to the right to vote. 

                    On the other hand, I'd be in favor of removing the right to vote from a lot of non-felons, while still allowing them the right to buy lottery tickets.

                    Dang only god knows with that much money at hand what it would finance! I shutter at the thought.

                     You have a point.  Ex-convicts might spang get us into a war with almost anyone, just for the hell of it, finance more strip mines, who knows what.

                    Yep.  Good thing we don't have no rich convicted felons. 

                    J

                     

                     

                    Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                    It's about number behavior.

                    Egos don't count.

                     

                    Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                     

                      BaristaExpress's avatar - BaristaExpressMX zpsfb0d8b5d.png
                      Magnolia, Delaware
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                      Posted: July 10, 2006, 9:21 pm - IP Logged

                      Dang Rip, you are a funny one, yes indeed.

                      Keep dreaming the impossible dream, it just may come true! Thumbs Up

                        Avatar
                        New Mexico
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                        Posted: July 10, 2006, 9:33 pm - IP Logged

                        Dang Rip, you are a funny one, yes indeed.

                        A worthy reply

                         

                        Absorb the good, ignore the bad, weigh the ugly.

                        It's about number behavior.

                        Egos don't count.

                         

                        Dedicated to the memory of Big Loooser

                         

                          Avatar
                          New Member
                          Gainesville, Ga.
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                          Member #46036
                          September 2, 2006
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                          Posted: September 2, 2006, 3:56 pm - IP Logged

                          I agree with doing away with rapest and murders, but the whole thing about not having cable tv or use of the internet makes me think that you are very close minded. I'm a convicted felon. I was convicted on a drug charge 7 years ago along with several other charges when I was younger. I now have a degree from a prominant University and haven't even had a traffic violation in the last six years. I believe if you are imprisoned you should have to pay for room and board, either by working for the prison or after you get out. The person reading that bible obviously doesn't attend church very often or their sleeping while in service. I take up collection at my church and have done so for years. Just because you mess up doesn't mean it should drown you for life

                            RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
                            mid-Ohio
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                            March 24, 2001
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                            Posted: September 2, 2006, 5:06 pm - IP Logged

                            Rip Snorter writes:

                            In 1964, I was arrested riding a freight-car in Rochester, NY.  Hoboing.  I had no idea it was a felony.  Spent some time in jail and was eventually released, but it could have easily gone the other way.  I had the right skin color, was wearing a University of New Mexico sweatshirt, which was a novelty in those days.... judge got conversational and I good-old-boyed him enough so they turned me loose with a warning......I could have just as easily spent the last 40 years as a convicted felon.

                            In 1965-66 I served with a lot of black "brothers" in Vietnam.  Since I had heard that blacks only made up about 7% of the general American population, I wondered why they were 15%-20% of the Americans I saw in Soc Trang.  When I asked some of them from NY how they came to be in Vietnam, they said they got into trouble just out of high school and the judge gave them a choice of either serving time in prison for a felony conviction or serving time in the military. 

                            If only a few good people could collect lottery winnings then very few people would play. 

                             * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
                               
                                         Evil Looking       

                              justxploring's avatar - villiarna
                              Wandering Aimlessly
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                              November 5, 2005
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                              Posted: September 2, 2006, 5:11 pm - IP Logged

                              "However, as long as prisons are funded by taxes and until criminals begin paying for their own room and board, I don't think they should be allowed to purchase tickets while incarcerated."

                              rcallahan - If you are referring to my post, then you read it too quickly. I do that too, and it's very common for a person to take bits and pieces from each comment and respond to all of them. However, if you go back and read exactly what I said, I never suggested that a criminal should pay for his/her own room & board and I also never mentioned the Bible, so maybe you're including another member's ideas in your reply. What I did say is that I don't think they should be entitled to buy tickets while incarcerated, because it would be with the taxpayer's money. Also, when I mentioned watching cable or using the internet, I was referring to prisoners, not men & women who have already served their time. After all, does it make sense for someone convicted of child pornography or internet fraud to given free access to the internet? (I have to work to pay that monthly cable bill and get internet access.)

                              When I was in college 35 years ago, I tried some "recreational" drugs like marijuana, and I'm sure many of the upstanding citizens who work in respectable jobs including ministers, rabbis and priests have had their share of problems.  Of course many felons shouldn't be labeled for life. Every case has to be individually examined.

                              You're lucky you were given a second chance and also had the will and the fortitude to change your life.  Keep up the good work.