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Finding a lottery ticket

Topic closed. 35 replies. Last post 7 years ago by joker17.

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United States
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June 1, 2009
5345 Posts
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Posted: December 13, 2009, 11:14 pm - IP Logged

Of course I'm serious. It's an exercise in logic, and if you had any inclination to actually think about the matter, maybe you wouldn't have to ask.  

"That is stealing, and therefore the ticket is no longer a bearer instument"

Where do you come up with these ideas? If something is a bearer instrument it will always be a bearer instrument unless you sign your name to it.  I'll assume you think that if somebody steals a ticket they don't own it, so how does that fit with your blanket statement  that "Whoever physically holds that document owns it."?

It may still be a bearer instrument, but it was obtained illegally, therefore stolen property. That's different than finding one on the street.

This argument is rediculous anyways because the last thing a burglar is looking for is a winning lottery ticket. The poster was talking about finding a lottery ticket. You're the one who brought up the whole stolen idea because you were digging at the bottom of the barrel, and then try to do a switch on me....Nice try.

    Dollar419's avatar - Lottery-050.jpg
    Santa Ana
    United States
    Member #71159
    February 20, 2009
    651 Posts
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    Posted: December 13, 2009, 11:49 pm - IP Logged

    This is just hypothetical.  Say you find a lottery ticket on ground.  It was for that nights drawing and the next day you look at the numbers and you won.  What are your rights to that ticket(if nobody signed the ticket).  Is that ticket yours or do you have to return.  What are the rules and what would you do with the ticket ( not the right thing but what would you do personally).

    If the found ticket were lost and not signed; then it is your ticket, plain and simple--which is why Lottery officials always state to sign your ticket no manner what; can they force you to do so? NO; however it makes just plain sense to sign it as proof it is your ticket and no one else--however there is the moral issue at stake; should or shouldn't you keep or turn in the ticket??? Only you can determine in your heart and mine the right thing to do at the exact right time; LOTTERY KARMA

      rdgrnr's avatar - walt
      Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
      United States
      Member #73904
      April 28, 2009
      14903 Posts
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      Posted: December 14, 2009, 1:36 am - IP Logged

      When I find one in Nacogdoches I'm cashin' that sucker in cuz Texas don't care if you stole it. Yee Haa! Ask Willis Willis.


                                                   
                           
                                               

       

       

       

       

                                                                                                         

      "The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing"

                                                                                                  --Edmund Burke

       

       

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        NY
        United States
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        October 16, 2005
        3475 Posts
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        Posted: December 14, 2009, 2:56 am - IP Logged

        A "switch"? I just used an easy example to demonstrate that your claim that "whoever physically holds that document owns it" is clearly incorrect. Given that, why would you think that the rest of the info from a simplistic definition you found on the internet is correct?

        I'll assume that your understanding of laws about lost property extends beyond "finders keepers" and you know that simply losing your property doesn't mean you immediately lose your ownership interest. If not, you can fix that with google as quickly as you can find an incomplete definition of bearer instruments. If so, why would you think that bearer instruments are some special class of property subject to different laws regarding ownership?


          rcbbuckeye's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
          Texas
          United States
          Member #55889
          October 23, 2007
          5615 Posts
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          Posted: December 14, 2009, 8:23 am - IP Logged

          When I find one in Nacogdoches I'm cashin' that sucker in cuz Texas don't care if you stole it. Yee Haa! Ask Willis Willis.

          rdgrnr,

          I never heard of any snake handlers in Nacodoches, LOL. You might get lost in TX.

          You are right about ol' Willis. Tx Lottery told his lawyer they paid out and that's it. The authorities recovered about $365k and are trying to get the rest, but the lottery comm is not involved with that.

          Of course, he didn't lose his tic, a clerk committed fraud. But he was careless and didn't sign his tic, and trusted a stranger.


            United States
            Member #75358
            June 1, 2009
            5345 Posts
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            Posted: December 14, 2009, 10:36 pm - IP Logged

            A "switch"? I just used an easy example to demonstrate that your claim that "whoever physically holds that document owns it" is clearly incorrect. Given that, why would you think that the rest of the info from a simplistic definition you found on the internet is correct?

            I'll assume that your understanding of laws about lost property extends beyond "finders keepers" and you know that simply losing your property doesn't mean you immediately lose your ownership interest. If not, you can fix that with google as quickly as you can find an incomplete definition of bearer instruments. If so, why would you think that bearer instruments are some special class of property subject to different laws regarding ownership?


            You're obviously making up your own rules regarding "bearer instruments". I don't need internet definitions, I just had to show you that I didn't make it up. Secondly, there shouldn't be any argument about this cause you're comparing bearer instrument documents to everyday property....like jewelry, steros, TVs, etc....They are two different things and the documents DO belong in a "special class property" category. If your case was true, they wouldn't have a different name for it. They'd call ALL possessions "Bearer instruments". BUT THEY DON'T !

            Either you're just playing me, or you are a very confused individual that can't understand the difference between documents and owned objects.

            Sorry, but I can't make it any simpler than I already have. All I'm doing is reiterating.

            That's about all I'm going to say on this........Good Luck !