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Should I report this error or not?

Topic closed. 35 replies. Last post 6 years ago by RJOh.

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HoLeeKau's avatar - YheaShea
Idaho
United States
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July 17, 2010
2284 Posts
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Posted: July 9, 2011, 1:58 pm - IP Logged

Did you report it ShyGirl?  What did the Lottery Commission say?

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    NY
    United States
    Member #23835
    October 16, 2005
    3502 Posts
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    Posted: July 11, 2011, 3:39 pm - IP Logged

    I'd say that RJ's idea sounds like a paranoid delusion, but it would certainly be possible.

    Remember the recent LP news story about the $33M lottery winner in Canada having to go to court in spite of turning in a signed winning ticket because another player claimed he bought lottery tickets all over town and  implied the winner was in cahoot with a clerk who actually stole the ticket from him.  He didn't show up for court but had he ran such a scam, he could have made it even more difficult for the winner.

    There's a huge difference between a clerk taking the opportunity to steal a winning ticket that's worth several thousand bucks and reselling tickets in the hopes that they can claim the possible prize anyway. With the former there's a fairly good chance they'll get away with it. With the latter probability says that if they buy and resell about 1000 tickets they could jump through a lot of hoops and devote a few hours of effort to maybe collect $50. On average they would need to resell 100,000 tickets or more to have a chance at collecting a significant prize. If they're lucky it's an occupation that might pay minimum wage.

      guesser's avatar - Lottery-017.jpg

      United States
      Member #41383
      June 16, 2006
      1969 Posts
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      Posted: July 12, 2011, 3:22 am - IP Logged

      There's a huge difference between a clerk taking the opportunity to steal a winning ticket that's worth several thousand bucks and reselling tickets in the hopes that they can claim the possible prize anyway. With the former there's a fairly good chance they'll get away with it. With the latter probability says that if they buy and resell about 1000 tickets they could jump through a lot of hoops and devote a few hours of effort to maybe collect $50. On average they would need to resell 100,000 tickets or more to have a chance at collecting a significant prize. If they're lucky it's an occupation that might pay minimum wage.

      'I'd say that RJ's idea sounds like a paranoid delusion, but it would certainly be possible.'

       

      I disagree.

      The USA is a litigous society, people get sued for looking at others the wrong way, gee, maybe you'll give me 25% to 'go away'.

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        NY
        United States
        Member #23835
        October 16, 2005
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        Posted: July 12, 2011, 4:55 pm - IP Logged

        How does our litigous society relate to the plausibilty of RJ's idea? RJ suggested the possibility that a clerk might buy tickets, resell them, and then try to claim the prizes for any of those tickets that happened to be winners.  The vast majority of winning tickets are worth less than $600, so there's no record of who they were sold to or who claimed the prizes. Who would you sue? It varies from game to game, but for megamillions such a clerk would, on average, have to buy and resell 689,000 tickets before having a chance to claim ownership of a ticket worth more than $750. If they can sell 100 tickets per shift they could expect to win every 6,890 shifts. That's 22 years of working 6 shifts every week, without taking a vacation. And without anybody noticing.

        Sure, it's possible that there are a few clerks who think that buying tickets, recording the numbers, creating  proof of ownership, reselling them, checking to see if any of them won prizes, and then contacting the lottery to claim they're entitlted to the prize for a ticket they don't have is a workable strategy for collecting a prize.  It's also possible that the kid next door is busy plotting to kidnap you and hold you for ransom. If you think   that's anything more than an extremely remote possibility it's a paranoid delusion unless there's some very unusual reason such a belief is more realistic than it is for most of us. RJ's scenario is possible, but there are far more likely, and rational, explanations.

          CARBOB's avatar - FL LOTTERY_LOGO.png
          ORLANDO, FLORIDA
          United States
          Member #4924
          June 3, 2004
          5982 Posts
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          Posted: July 12, 2011, 5:11 pm - IP Logged

           I buy my PB tickets in Publix, if I tell the clerk, QP and forget to say, PP, I still have to buy the ticket. The clerks are not allowed to take them back and they are not allowed to stock-pile for future sales. I think the lottery commission would frown on a clerk buying tickets in one store and selling them in another.

          Spoke to Publix clerk today about PB tickets. She told me about an incident that happen a couple of weeks ago. A customer wanted to purchase some PB, advanced play tickets. She ask , are you sure, the price will be $98, the customer said, yes. After she printed the tickets, customer refused them and wanted different tickets. She refused to sell her any, until she paid for the printed PB tickets, the customer left without paying. Make a long story short, the clerk and 5 other employees bought the tickets. I wished her all the luck and really am pulling for them. I reminded her of the employees at a Publix store, 4 or 5 months ago winning.

            RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
            mid-Ohio
            United States
            Member #9
            March 24, 2001
            19903 Posts
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            Posted: July 13, 2011, 11:02 pm - IP Logged

            How does our litigous society relate to the plausibilty of RJ's idea? RJ suggested the possibility that a clerk might buy tickets, resell them, and then try to claim the prizes for any of those tickets that happened to be winners.  The vast majority of winning tickets are worth less than $600, so there's no record of who they were sold to or who claimed the prizes. Who would you sue? It varies from game to game, but for megamillions such a clerk would, on average, have to buy and resell 689,000 tickets before having a chance to claim ownership of a ticket worth more than $750. If they can sell 100 tickets per shift they could expect to win every 6,890 shifts. That's 22 years of working 6 shifts every week, without taking a vacation. And without anybody noticing.

            Sure, it's possible that there are a few clerks who think that buying tickets, recording the numbers, creating  proof of ownership, reselling them, checking to see if any of them won prizes, and then contacting the lottery to claim they're entitlted to the prize for a ticket they don't have is a workable strategy for collecting a prize.  It's also possible that the kid next door is busy plotting to kidnap you and hold you for ransom. If you think   that's anything more than an extremely remote possibility it's a paranoid delusion unless there's some very unusual reason such a belief is more realistic than it is for most of us. RJ's scenario is possible, but there are far more likely, and rational, explanations.

            I doubt if a clerk was pulling that scam, he would come forward unless the prize was $100K or better and if that never happened no one would ever know the scam existed.
             
            I remember a clerk trying to keep my free QPs once when Ohio had a promotion of a free QP with each $5 ticket saying she thought the free tickets were for the clerks.

            When NBC Dateline approached the NY lottery about running a program like they ran in California to catch clerks stealing customers winning lottery tickets, NY said they weren't interested because they thought giving a clerk the opportunity to steal a winning lottery ticket from a customer was entrapment.  Apparently, they expect clerks to be dishonest when they think they can get away with it.

             * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
               
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