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Strategy for remaining anonymous

Topic closed. 52 replies. Last post 5 months ago by zephbe.

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HoLeeKau's avatar - YheaShea
Idaho
United States
Member #94283
July 17, 2010
2284 Posts
Offline
Posted: July 7, 2016, 2:49 pm - IP Logged

No matter what you do...Eventually your family members, friends, banker and the media will know you won.  In the past, when bad things happened to lottery winners, it was usually the result of the dishonest people the lottery winner associated with.  Personally, I wouldn't mind the attention.  Rich and famous wouldn't bother me a bit.

Yes, many people can't keep their mouths shut, or can't resist blowing a bunch of money right away, or don't know how to set boundaries on what others know about their finances.

But some of us can and do keep a win private.  And once you figure out how to keep the lottery from releasing your name, it's not that hard.  You just have to keep your mouth shut, and control your spending for a short time.  I'm willing to make some sacrifices for a year or two in order to reap the benefits of living peacefully for the rest of my life without being hounded.  The hardest thing is if you're married to a blabber mouth.  I'm not sure you could do this without a spouse's knowledge, and it's hard to control someone else.  Rule #1:  Don't marry a blabbermouth.  Big Smile

I'm not married to a blabbermouth, and I already keep my personal business very private, and don't feel the need to live a flashy lifestyle.  Yes, my lifestyle would change immediately if I won a lot of money, but in a way that I could attribute to a small inheritance or to a good investment I cashed in.  By that I mean, I wouldn't immediately move to a 5 million dollar home in a gated community, I would instead just move a rung or two up the housing ladder into a nicer home in a nicer neighborhood.

I'd have my old house torn down and 3 skinny homes built.  Everyone who lives in this area would know that's a profit of 1 or 2 hundred grand.  Then buy a couple more old homes (presumably with the money I made off the first ones if anyone asks) and do the same thing.  Less profit because I'm having to buy the land, but who will be doing the math after I've done this a dozen times?   I wouldn't have to actually be making any money at all as long as I kept up the image by buying and selling.  Pretty soon everyone would think I increased the initial investment or inheritance that I cashed in by developing real estate.  After doing this for a year or so I could upgrade my home and lifestyle again, and I doubt anyone would even ask where the money came from.  They'd assume it was the real estate thing.  In another year or so I could pretty much live however I wanted with no one the wiser as to where the money is coming from, and no way they would know just how wealthy I am.  I think the key would be to do it gradually, like a person who is actually earning their money would do it.

I guarantee, if I could first figure out how to claim anonymously, no one would ever know where my money came from except the professionals who help me claim it, and that group will be PROFESSIONALS who understand that my privacy is valuable to me, and do everything in their power to afford me that privacy.

    wander73's avatar - Lottery-038.jpg
    Philadelphia, PA
    United States
    Member #153774
    March 24, 2014
    852 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: July 7, 2016, 2:53 pm - IP Logged

    Yes, many people can't keep their mouths shut, or can't resist blowing a bunch of money right away, or don't know how to set boundaries on what others know about their finances.

    But some of us can and do keep a win private.  And once you figure out how to keep the lottery from releasing your name, it's not that hard.  You just have to keep your mouth shut, and control your spending for a short time.  I'm willing to make some sacrifices for a year or two in order to reap the benefits of living peacefully for the rest of my life without being hounded.  The hardest thing is if you're married to a blabber mouth.  I'm not sure you could do this without a spouse's knowledge, and it's hard to control someone else.  Rule #1:  Don't marry a blabbermouth.  Big Smile

    I'm not married to a blabbermouth, and I already keep my personal business very private, and don't feel the need to live a flashy lifestyle.  Yes, my lifestyle would change immediately if I won a lot of money, but in a way that I could attribute to a small inheritance or to a good investment I cashed in.  By that I mean, I wouldn't immediately move to a 5 million dollar home in a gated community, I would instead just move a rung or two up the housing ladder into a nicer home in a nicer neighborhood.

    I'd have my old house torn down and 3 skinny homes built.  Everyone who lives in this area would know that's a profit of 1 or 2 hundred grand.  Then buy a couple more old homes (presumably with the money I made off the first ones if anyone asks) and do the same thing.  Less profit because I'm having to buy the land, but who will be doing the math after I've done this a dozen times?   I wouldn't have to actually be making any money at all as long as I kept up the image by buying and selling.  Pretty soon everyone would think I increased the initial investment or inheritance that I cashed in by developing real estate.  After doing this for a year or so I could upgrade my home and lifestyle again, and I doubt anyone would even ask where the money came from.  They'd assume it was the real estate thing.  In another year or so I could pretty much live however I wanted with no one the wiser as to where the money is coming from, and no way they would know just how wealthy I am.  I think the key would be to do it gradually, like a person who is actually earning their money would do it.

    I guarantee, if I could first figure out how to claim anonymously, no one would ever know where my money came from except the professionals who help me claim it, and that group will be PROFESSIONALS who understand that my privacy is valuable to me, and do everything in their power to afford me that privacy.

    According to someone I spoke to at a wawa here in Philly,  there was a winner in Florida and for some reason the news media found out about this person through you guessed it facebook.  I deactivated mine and not on linkedin. 

     

    I will also mention that some girls I know want breast implants, booty big one etc.   Well I hate to say this I would have the person marry me and have them sign something.

     

    I def agree people need to keep their mouths shut absolutely. 

     

    It also sickens me that some friends think they're owed free money from that person that hits.  Nope.

     

    What I would do is if I trust the person enough is make them sign something with a lawyer and tell them what I want them to mention.  Or hide some place. 

     

    With the way the jobs are in this country,  the economy you never know who might hear or see something.

      realtorjim's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcT7U3t20NgScoPlxOqLT6TR0vQeJNBV3_tTswe1XeFDTsdw3NLZ

      United States
      Member #106923
      February 27, 2011
      476 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: July 7, 2016, 2:58 pm - IP Logged

      Yes, many people can't keep their mouths shut, or can't resist blowing a bunch of money right away, or don't know how to set boundaries on what others know about their finances.

      But some of us can and do keep a win private.  And once you figure out how to keep the lottery from releasing your name, it's not that hard.  You just have to keep your mouth shut, and control your spending for a short time.  I'm willing to make some sacrifices for a year or two in order to reap the benefits of living peacefully for the rest of my life without being hounded.  The hardest thing is if you're married to a blabber mouth.  I'm not sure you could do this without a spouse's knowledge, and it's hard to control someone else.  Rule #1:  Don't marry a blabbermouth.  Big Smile

      I'm not married to a blabbermouth, and I already keep my personal business very private, and don't feel the need to live a flashy lifestyle.  Yes, my lifestyle would change immediately if I won a lot of money, but in a way that I could attribute to a small inheritance or to a good investment I cashed in.  By that I mean, I wouldn't immediately move to a 5 million dollar home in a gated community, I would instead just move a rung or two up the housing ladder into a nicer home in a nicer neighborhood.

      I'd have my old house torn down and 3 skinny homes built.  Everyone who lives in this area would know that's a profit of 1 or 2 hundred grand.  Then buy a couple more old homes (presumably with the money I made off the first ones if anyone asks) and do the same thing.  Less profit because I'm having to buy the land, but who will be doing the math after I've done this a dozen times?   I wouldn't have to actually be making any money at all as long as I kept up the image by buying and selling.  Pretty soon everyone would think I increased the initial investment or inheritance that I cashed in by developing real estate.  After doing this for a year or so I could upgrade my home and lifestyle again, and I doubt anyone would even ask where the money came from.  They'd assume it was the real estate thing.  In another year or so I could pretty much live however I wanted with no one the wiser as to where the money is coming from, and no way they would know just how wealthy I am.  I think the key would be to do it gradually, like a person who is actually earning their money would do it.

      I guarantee, if I could first figure out how to claim anonymously, no one would ever know where my money came from except the professionals who help me claim it, and that group will be PROFESSIONALS who understand that my privacy is valuable to me, and do everything in their power to afford me that privacy.

      "Yes, many people can't keep their mouths shut, or can't resist blowing a bunch of money right away, or don't know how to set boundaries on what others know about their finances."

      Geesh guys, what do you mean "did I win the lottery"?  Is it a crime to buy a new car once in a while?  I just happen to like Lamborghini's.  I mean really, just a second, 'waitress, can we get another bottle of Dom Perignon over here'.  So, has anyone invested in that new tech firm?  I just put a $1 million into it...

        I'm feeling a jackpot win coming my way!

        LiveInGreenBay's avatar - driver
        Green Bay
        United States
        Member #169391
        October 15, 2015
        1239 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: July 7, 2016, 3:07 pm - IP Logged

        All I can say is... If you win the lottery and you're married, stay married.  If you're single, don't get married.  Big Grin

        Never give up.  Banana

          Avatar
          New Member
          Columbia, SC
          United States
          Member #175832
          July 7, 2016
          4 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: July 7, 2016, 3:18 pm - IP Logged

          First the easy stuff that doesn't have much wiggle room. You're proposing a simple and straightforward financial transaction: sell your financial instrument to somebody else. You'll have an acquisition cost, a selling price, and a gross income from the profit that doesn't qualify for capital gains treatment. In that respect the tax issues are essentially the same as they'd be if you claimed the prize yourself. It will also be the same for the buyer as any other financial transaction: they'll buy the ticket and pay taxes on their profit. Their tax rate may be different than for an individual, but their profit will be far less than the cash value, and the only reason their tax bill matters to you is that it affects what they're willing to pay for the ticket. Assuming the lottery (and state) still withhold the normal amount you'd have to figure on waiting for full payment for your sale, or having the sale price reflect their lost earnings while the company waits to get the money back when they file their tax return.

          The only wrinkle I see with respect to the basic strategy would be how the tax authorities view the nature of your dealings with the company you use. If they treat it as a simple sale of the ticket everything works as above. OTOH, there's a chance they'll treat it as if you simply hired the company to act on your behalf. In that case you'd pay taxes on the entire cash value, with any money paid to the company treated as a non-deductible fee for services. Those fees would still be taxable income to the company, so no changes there.

          As for where taxes are due, the state that sells the ticket gets first crack at state taxes. I don't know you got the delusion that only two states tax non-residents, but I promise you that a state that has an income tax on lottery winnings will tax the prize regardless of where the claimant lives. The state of residence is also entitled to tax on the income, but will apply a tax credit for the amount paid to the other state. In your example, if the winner was a SC resident NC would collect 5.75%, and SC would collect 1.25%, since their rate is 7%. In your scenario the company claiming the prize should be a NC entity, so they'd only pay NC tax. You should only pay SC income tax, since your income is from selling the ticket rather than from the NC prize. Since the company gets a tax deduction for the selling price of the ticket NC would lose about $20 million in income tax. Expect them to be unhappy, and possibly look for a way to collect it. If that happens SC may still  look for their 7% on the full sale price.

          The real problem could be because the claimant isn't the person who bought the ticket. Forget what you think you know about bearer instruments. The ticket has a legal owner and the lottery isn't going to knowingly give the prize to somebody else simply because they're the one who walks through the door with the ticket. Unlike somebody who finds or steals the ticket the company representative will be able to answer all of the security questions, but they won't be the person on the security video. Claiming as a company instead of an individual would also be likely to raise questions. Figure there's a very good chance that could result in the lottery insisting on meeting the person who actually bought the ticket, so odds are they'll know who you are. The question then becomes what the exact rules about releasing the winner's name are. The company will clearly be the entity claiming the prize, but there's a perfectly valid argument that the person who bought the ticket and gets most of the money is the winner. You'd very much want to be sure about that detail before selling the ticket for several million dollars less than its actual cash value.

          Thanks for the lengthy reply.  Good information.

            lejardin's avatar - Lottery-014.jpg

            United States
            Member #118609
            November 4, 2011
            931 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: July 7, 2016, 3:25 pm - IP Logged

            Hmmm... Let's try this scenario;

             

            James:  Hello Mr. Lawfirm.  I have just won the half billion dollar Mega Millions Lottery.  I would like to stay completely anonymous so I have this proposal.  I would like to sell your firm the ticket for less than face value of the cash amount.  You claim the prize and pay me my share. 

            Mr. Lawfirm:  Wonderful idea James.  I'll have the paperwork drawn up immediately.  Let's go to lunch!

            Mr. Lawfirm:  Here are the documents, James.  You sign over the ticket to us.  Our agreed price is $175,000,000 cash.  You stay out of the limelight as the claimant. 

            James:  Fantastic (as he signs the contract and hands over the ticket).

            Media:  The winner of the half billion dollar Mega Million lottery jackpot has come forth.  It is Mr. Different.

            James:  Mr. Lawfirm, you claimed the money, but I haven't received my check.  What's up?

            Mr. Lawfirm: James, we didn't claim the money.  Your ticket was purchased under our LLC and it immediately resold its interest in the ticket to Mr. Different.  Since that time our LLC company has experienced severe financial difficulties and is in the process of liquidating.

            James:  But what about our contract?

            Mr. Lawfirm: Yes, that would be with the LLC.  I'm sorry, but I must run.  I have a plane to catch.  Switzerland is nice this time of year.

            Oh my goodness, how true!  I have NO doubt this would and could happen.  After reading all theses secarios, I think end result is suck it up, claim yourself but have your attorney, cpa or financial advisor claim it on your behalf to avoid all the initial publicity.

              TheMeatman2005's avatar - lightening
              Brooklyn, NY
              United States
              Member #169723
              October 29, 2015
              877 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: July 7, 2016, 4:48 pm - IP Logged

              According to someone I spoke to at a wawa here in Philly,  there was a winner in Florida and for some reason the news media found out about this person through you guessed it facebook.  I deactivated mine and not on linkedin. 

               

              I will also mention that some girls I know want breast implants, booty big one etc.   Well I hate to say this I would have the person marry me and have them sign something.

               

              I def agree people need to keep their mouths shut absolutely. 

               

              It also sickens me that some friends think they're owed free money from that person that hits.  Nope.

               

              What I would do is if I trust the person enough is make them sign something with a lawyer and tell them what I want them to mention.  Or hide some place. 

               

              With the way the jobs are in this country,  the economy you never know who might hear or see something.

              Do you always consult with your local Wawa? Is this a reliable source?

              The Meatman

              “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket.” Will Rogers

              Winning happens in a flash, Like A Bolt Of Lightning!  Patriot

                grwurston's avatar - Cute animals_Spider.jpg
                Winning makes me smile.
                bel air maryland
                United States
                Member #90251
                April 24, 2010
                4855 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: July 7, 2016, 5:50 pm - IP Logged

                Are lottery prizes taxable?

                Lottery winnings of $600.01 and over are subject to Federal Withholding tax.  For winnings of $600.01, up to and including $5,000, you will be issued a W-2G form to report your winnings on your federal income tax form.  For winnings of $5,000.01 and over, your state's Department of Revenue removes the 25 percent federal withholding before you receive your winnings check (or, if it is an annuity, from each winnings check).  You then receive a W-2G form with each check to submit with your 1040 form to show that the 25 percent federal withholding already has been paid.  In addition to federal tax, your state will make additional withholdings for taxes, and most states will deduct other money that you may owe to the state, such as back taxes, child support, loan payments, etc.  In addition, like the federal tax withholding, the state tax withholding at the time of prize payout may not be the total state tax owed at the end of the year.  You must consult your state division of taxation for more information about the total state tax requirements for lottery winners.

                The state tax withholdings are as follows:

                Arizona 5% state withholding (Arizona residents), 6% state withholding (non-Arizona residents)
                Arkansas 7% state withholding
                California No state tax on lottery prizes
                Colorado 4% state withholding
                Connecticut 6.99% state withholding
                Delaware No state tax on lottery prizes
                Florida No state tax on lottery prizes
                Georgia 6% state withholding
                Idaho 7.4% state withholding
                Illinois 3.75% state withholding
                Indiana 3.4% state withholding
                Iowa 5% state withholding
                Kansas 5% state withholding
                Kentucky 6% state withholding
                Louisiana 5% state withholding
                Maine 5% state withholding
                Maryland 8.75% state withholding (Maryland residents), 7.5% state withholding (non-Maryland residents)
                Massachusetts 5% state withholding
                Michigan 4.25% state withholding
                Minnesota 7.25% state withholding
                Missouri 4% state withholding
                Montana 6.9% state withholding
                Nebraska 5% state withholding
                New Hampshire No state tax on lottery prizes
                New Jersey 8% state withholding
                New Mexico 6% state withholding
                New York 8.82% state withholding, plus: 3.876% (NYC residents), 1.323% (Yonkers residents)
                North Carolina 5.75% state withholding
                North Dakota 2.9% state withholding
                Ohio 4% state withholding
                Oklahoma 4% state withholding
                Oregon 8% state withholding
                Pennsylvania No state tax on lottery prizes
                Rhode Island 5.99% state withholding
                South Carolina 7% state withholding
                South Dakota No state tax on lottery prizes
                Tennessee No state tax on lottery prizes
                Texas No state tax on lottery prizes
                U.S. Virgin Islands  Unknown State Tax Rate
                Vermont 6% state withholding
                Virginia 4% state withholding
                Washington No state tax on lottery prizes
                Washington, D.C. 8.5% state withholding
                West Virginia 6.5% state withholding
                Wisconsin 7.75% state withholding
                Wyoming No state tax on lottery prizes

                † This state/jurisdiction has not responded to our requests for this information.

                If I live in a state that taxes prizes, but bought my ticket in a state with no tax on prizes, do I still need to pay state tax?

                Yes, you do.  Think of lottery prizes as regular earned income from a job.  Just because you may work in a different state, that doesn't permit you to get away with not paying state income tax in your state of residence.  The lottery works the same way.

                Whether it's income from a job or income from gambling, the state where the money is won will tax the prize first at their out-of-state tax rate (assuming the state taxes lottery winnings).  If your state of residence has the same or lower tax rate, then you won't owe anything else.  But if your state has a higher rate, you will get a credit for what you paid in the other state, and pay the difference to your state.

                If the other state has no tax, you just pay the entire tax bill to your state.

                The net result is that you end up paying whichever tax rate is higher between your state of residence and the state where you purchased the ticket.  Of course, the tax law is quite complex and it's possible that some condition or arrangement exists between the two states and a good tax attorney and/or accountant could discover a tax-saving loophole.  That's why we always recommend that major prize winners do not make any major decisions before first hiring a good legal and financial team.

                One other option to consider, depending on how much in taxes you're looking to save: the residency requirements as they relate to prize claims, state taxes, and income reporting.  Since you aren't responsible for paying taxes until you claim the prize, perhaps there is time to establish residency in the state where you purchased the ticket before the prize claim period expires.  However, that is something you would definitely need to explore with an attorney before taking any action to assess the feasibility.  You would also need to decide if it would be worth the risk of that important little piece of paper not getting lost, damaged, or destroyed in the time you spend arranging everything.

                "You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra, Hall of Fame baseball player.

                The numbers will tell you what numbers to play. Pay attention to the numbers.

                Don't just think outside the box, crush it.

                  LiveInGreenBay's avatar - driver
                  Green Bay
                  United States
                  Member #169391
                  October 15, 2015
                  1239 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: July 7, 2016, 5:58 pm - IP Logged

                  Are lottery prizes taxable?

                  Lottery winnings of $600.01 and over are subject to Federal Withholding tax.  For winnings of $600.01, up to and including $5,000, you will be issued a W-2G form to report your winnings on your federal income tax form.  For winnings of $5,000.01 and over, your state's Department of Revenue removes the 25 percent federal withholding before you receive your winnings check (or, if it is an annuity, from each winnings check).  You then receive a W-2G form with each check to submit with your 1040 form to show that the 25 percent federal withholding already has been paid.  In addition to federal tax, your state will make additional withholdings for taxes, and most states will deduct other money that you may owe to the state, such as back taxes, child support, loan payments, etc.  In addition, like the federal tax withholding, the state tax withholding at the time of prize payout may not be the total state tax owed at the end of the year.  You must consult your state division of taxation for more information about the total state tax requirements for lottery winners.

                  The state tax withholdings are as follows:

                  Arizona 5% state withholding (Arizona residents), 6% state withholding (non-Arizona residents)
                  Arkansas 7% state withholding
                  California No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Colorado 4% state withholding
                  Connecticut 6.99% state withholding
                  Delaware No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Florida No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Georgia 6% state withholding
                  Idaho 7.4% state withholding
                  Illinois 3.75% state withholding
                  Indiana 3.4% state withholding
                  Iowa 5% state withholding
                  Kansas 5% state withholding
                  Kentucky 6% state withholding
                  Louisiana 5% state withholding
                  Maine 5% state withholding
                  Maryland 8.75% state withholding (Maryland residents), 7.5% state withholding (non-Maryland residents)
                  Massachusetts 5% state withholding
                  Michigan 4.25% state withholding
                  Minnesota 7.25% state withholding
                  Missouri 4% state withholding
                  Montana 6.9% state withholding
                  Nebraska 5% state withholding
                  New Hampshire No state tax on lottery prizes
                  New Jersey 8% state withholding
                  New Mexico 6% state withholding
                  New York 8.82% state withholding, plus: 3.876% (NYC residents), 1.323% (Yonkers residents)
                  North Carolina 5.75% state withholding
                  North Dakota 2.9% state withholding
                  Ohio 4% state withholding
                  Oklahoma 4% state withholding
                  Oregon 8% state withholding
                  Pennsylvania No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Rhode Island 5.99% state withholding
                  South Carolina 7% state withholding
                  South Dakota No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Tennessee No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Texas No state tax on lottery prizes
                  U.S. Virgin Islands  Unknown State Tax Rate
                  Vermont 6% state withholding
                  Virginia 4% state withholding
                  Washington No state tax on lottery prizes
                  Washington, D.C. 8.5% state withholding
                  West Virginia 6.5% state withholding
                  Wisconsin 7.75% state withholding
                  Wyoming No state tax on lottery prizes

                  † This state/jurisdiction has not responded to our requests for this information.

                  If I live in a state that taxes prizes, but bought my ticket in a state with no tax on prizes, do I still need to pay state tax?

                  Yes, you do.  Think of lottery prizes as regular earned income from a job.  Just because you may work in a different state, that doesn't permit you to get away with not paying state income tax in your state of residence.  The lottery works the same way.

                  Whether it's income from a job or income from gambling, the state where the money is won will tax the prize first at their out-of-state tax rate (assuming the state taxes lottery winnings).  If your state of residence has the same or lower tax rate, then you won't owe anything else.  But if your state has a higher rate, you will get a credit for what you paid in the other state, and pay the difference to your state.

                  If the other state has no tax, you just pay the entire tax bill to your state.

                  The net result is that you end up paying whichever tax rate is higher between your state of residence and the state where you purchased the ticket.  Of course, the tax law is quite complex and it's possible that some condition or arrangement exists between the two states and a good tax attorney and/or accountant could discover a tax-saving loophole.  That's why we always recommend that major prize winners do not make any major decisions before first hiring a good legal and financial team.

                  One other option to consider, depending on how much in taxes you're looking to save: the residency requirements as they relate to prize claims, state taxes, and income reporting.  Since you aren't responsible for paying taxes until you claim the prize, perhaps there is time to establish residency in the state where you purchased the ticket before the prize claim period expires.  However, that is something you would definitely need to explore with an attorney before taking any action to assess the feasibility.  You would also need to decide if it would be worth the risk of that important little piece of paper not getting lost, damaged, or destroyed in the time you spend arranging everything.

                  You're still ugly.  Couldn't find a photo of a cute kitten?

                  Never give up.  Banana

                    grwurston's avatar - Cute animals_Spider.jpg
                    Winning makes me smile.
                    bel air maryland
                    United States
                    Member #90251
                    April 24, 2010
                    4855 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: July 7, 2016, 6:05 pm - IP Logged

                    You're still ugly.  Couldn't find a photo of a cute kitten?

                    C'mon, you don't like cute smiling spiders? They do bring Good Luck ya know.

                    Besides, I'm more of a dog guy.

                    "You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra, Hall of Fame baseball player.

                    The numbers will tell you what numbers to play. Pay attention to the numbers.

                    Don't just think outside the box, crush it.

                      Avatar
                      Baton Rouge, LA
                      United States
                      Member #4602
                      May 7, 2004
                      699 Posts
                      Offline
                      Posted: July 7, 2016, 7:00 pm - IP Logged

                      Some people use trusts to claim lottery prizes anonymously, while others have used corporations or LLCs. No method is completely anonymous, but these methods to make the winner a little hard to find.

                      There's a book called "How to be Invisible" by J.J. Luna. The book is written in a somewhat paranoid tone, but it gives interesting information on how one can be tracked down and ways it can be made harder to be tracked down. There's no way to be 100% anonymous, but it can be made harder to be tracked down, hard enough so most will either run out money or just give up trying.

                      If I did win, I'd probably follow some of the advice in that book.

                      Prisoner Six

                      "I am not a number, I am a free man!"

                        HoLeeKau's avatar - YheaShea
                        Idaho
                        United States
                        Member #94283
                        July 17, 2010
                        2284 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: July 7, 2016, 7:10 pm - IP Logged

                        Thanks PS, I just put that on hold at the library.  Should be interesting!

                          TheMeatman2005's avatar - lightening
                          Brooklyn, NY
                          United States
                          Member #169723
                          October 29, 2015
                          877 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: July 7, 2016, 7:13 pm - IP Logged

                          Some people use trusts to claim lottery prizes anonymously, while others have used corporations or LLCs. No method is completely anonymous, but these methods to make the winner a little hard to find.

                          There's a book called "How to be Invisible" by J.J. Luna. The book is written in a somewhat paranoid tone, but it gives interesting information on how one can be tracked down and ways it can be made harder to be tracked down. There's no way to be 100% anonymous, but it can be made harder to be tracked down, hard enough so most will either run out money or just give up trying.

                          If I did win, I'd probably follow some of the advice in that book.

                          Another way to remain anonymous...kinda, is to

                          1. move (without letting anyone [other than close family] know where you are moving to)
                          2. notify payees (credit card companies) of your change of address directly. But, of course, when you win, you will pay them all off and owe nothing. Don't file a change of address with the USPS.
                          3. change your phone number to an unlisted number (even if it does cost a few bucks more)
                          4. keep a low profile for a few years. 

                          The Meatman

                          “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket.” Will Rogers

                          Winning happens in a flash, Like A Bolt Of Lightning!  Patriot

                            Romancandle's avatar - moon
                            Upacreek
                            United States
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                            December 8, 2012
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                            Posted: July 7, 2016, 7:42 pm - IP Logged

                            Excellent discussion

                            -RC

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                              Baton Rouge, LA
                              United States
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                              May 7, 2004
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                              Posted: July 7, 2016, 9:53 pm - IP Logged

                              Another way to remain anonymous...kinda, is to

                              1. move (without letting anyone [other than close family] know where you are moving to)
                              2. notify payees (credit card companies) of your change of address directly. But, of course, when you win, you will pay them all off and owe nothing. Don't file a change of address with the USPS.
                              3. change your phone number to an unlisted number (even if it does cost a few bucks more)
                              4. keep a low profile for a few years. 

                              Good suggestions, but I can add to it a little.

                              Find out about titling assets, such as property, vehicles, etc., in the names of trusts or LLCs, making it harder to find out who the real owner is. The book I recommended has info about that.

                              Don't have your mail sent to your home, use a PO Box or a private mail center like the UPS store, or better yet use both. That way, nobody, not even your mail carrier or the UPS guy, will know where you live or who you really are. As for the phone, use a prepaid mobile phone, definitely cheaper than an unlisted number and there's no record of who owns the phone number anywhere, not even the phone company.

                              Keeping a low profile is a good idea too. I'd probably buy a nice car, but not something over the top like a Rolls Royce or a Ferrari. I'd buy a nicer house, but not something like the Beverly Hillbillies mansion. If I win a piece of it, I plan to live quiet life with as few worries as possible.

                              Prisoner Six

                              "I am not a number, I am a free man!"