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Iowa Lottery security chief bent on determining identity of jackpot winner

Hot LottoHot Lotto: Iowa Lottery security chief bent on determining identity of jackpot winner
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The mystery began on Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010. Time: 3:24 p.m. Scene: a QuikTrip, 4801 N.E. 14th St., near Interstate Highway 35/80 in Des Moines.

Somebody bought a Hot Lotto ticket there. Six days later, the ticket turned into a $16.5 million winner. Then the ticket went unclaimed for 364 days, 22 hours and 10 minutes.

At 2:10 p.m. on Dec. 29, two attorneys from the prominent Des Moines firm Davis, Brown, Koehn, Shors & Roberts PC presented the ticket, one hour and 50 minutes before it was to expire.

But the winner remains hidden.

The main person responsible for unraveling the mystery: an Army veteran and former police officer named Steve Bogle, Iowa Lottery vice president for security.

There is more at stake in this case than millions of dollars. The integrity of the Iowa Lottery is on the line. If anonymous, faceless trusts claim major prizes, it undermines public confidence and gives the impression of impropriety in the game, Bogle said.

"It doesn't work if people don't believe everybody has the same odds of winning," he said. "There is nothing to suggest anything improper has been done here, but we need to check every angle to know if the ticket was legally obtained, legally possessed and legally claimed."

The ticket was signed by Crawford Shaw of Bedford, N.Y. Shaw signed as trustee for Hexam Investments Trust. Shaw, 76, is also an attorney. He is not the winner. He represents the person or people who won. Shaw has said he plans to meet with Iowa Lottery officials this week.

"I think everything will be OK when all the facts are put on the table," Shaw said.

They'll have to be. If the person or persons behind the trust Shaw represents aren't known to lottery officials, they won't get paid.

"If we can't get that information, there is no way I can recommend to (Iowa Lottery CEO) Terry Rich that they pay this ticket," Bogle said.

So Bogle is both detective and honor guard in the strangest jackpot in the 26 years of Iowa Lottery history. He won't reveal the specific steps he's taking to verify the claim, but Bogle was a lawman for 36 years and has handled cases from murder to petty theft. He knows his way around an investigation.

Bogle 'a person who does things right'

Bogle joined the lottery in August 2011 after retiring as a brigadier general in the Iowa Army National Guard.

He knew he wanted to be a lawman in his early teens, in part from watching Jack Webb TV shows such as "Dragnet" and "Adam-12."

A 1975 East High School alumnus, Bogle joined the Guard at 17 and became an MP. Eventually, he became a Des Moines police officer. Then Bogle got mad at the Des Moines police department and wanted to quit. He can't remember what ticked him off.

"It shows how important it really was," Bogle said in retrospect. "The only thing I knew how to do was be a cop or a soldier. I decided I didn't want to be in that position ever again and got serious about my education."

He worked overnight shifts and went to school full time to earn a pre-law degree in 1986 from Grand View University, then called Grand View College. In the middle of his studies, he took a year to become a helicopter pilot for the Guard, flying rescue missions out of Fort Hood, Texas, and other locations.

After leaving the police force, he became director of the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation, the state's top criminal investigation agency.

Nobody is better suited to lead the investigation than Bogle, said Gene Meyer, Bogle's longtime friend and former director of the Iowa Department of Public Safety, which houses the investigation division.

"If you want something handled right and with great integrity, there is no question Steve will take care of it," Meyer said. "He is a person who does things right. He has great vision and he earns his opportunities."

Little made public about the winner

Even Bogle seems to be as puzzled as the public about the elusive winner.

"Like everyone else, I want to know where this ticket has been for the last year," Bogle said. "Basically, we start at the end — the day it was claimed — and work backward."

Large jackpots are generally claimed within a few days of announcement of the winning numbers. A prize of $600,000 went unclaimed in 1987, the largest sum left on the table in Iowa. Dozens of smaller prizes, as much as $250,000, have gone unclaimed.

Little has been made public about the person who bought the ticket. Iowa Lottery officials have reviewed store surveillance camera footage. They declined to identify the gender of the person or whether the individual paid with cash or debit card. (Credit cards may not be used to buy lottery tickets.)

The lottery has received dozens of claims the ticket was stolen. Such claims are common when big jackpots are awarded, officials said, though they plan to investigate the veracity of each claim. The alleged theft victims, however, all failed to sign the ticket. Under Iowa law, a lottery ticket is a "bearer instrument," which means the person who possesses the ticket owns it — unless the ticket is signed. Even the actual winner or winners never signed the ticket, instead delegating the task to Shaw as a trustee.

However, lottery officials are certain the ticket is genuine. They just don't know who bought it.

Principal players await parlor scene

The lottery player from December 2010 bought 10 plays over five Hot Lotto drawings for a total of $10. The player selected two sets of six numbers to be played in drawings on Dec. 25 and 29, 2010, and Jan. 1, 5 and 8, 2011.

The winning numbers were 3, 12, 16, 26, 33 and a Hotball of 11. The winner hit on the second of the five drawings on Dec. 29, 2010. At the time, the ticket was worth $16.5 million as an annuity payment.

That annuity pot has decreased because of the slumping stock market since the drawing. It is now worth a $14.3 million annuity. The one-time cash payment value of the ticket remains at about $10.8 million. The winner or winners have 60 days from claiming the prize to select cash or annuity payment.

But before that, the mystery must have a parlor scene — a literary term for the climax of crime novels where the true culprit, or in this case, lottery winner, is revealed.

Shaw says that's coming this week. Lottery officials say they're ready to meet when Shaw is.

"No lives are on the line here," Bogle said. "That's different than a lot of the cases in my career. This one, though, I think there's going to be a happy ending."

News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

Des Moines Register

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66 comments. Last comment 5 years ago by rdgrnr.
Page 1 of 5
savagegoose's avatar - ProfilePho
adelaide sa
Australia
Member #37136
April 11, 2006
3300 Posts
Offline
Posted: January 10, 2012, 6:48 pm - IP Logged

ok so i think i see the difference with our anonymous ,and usa's. here the person is known to the state as the winner, but  identity  remains anonymous to the public. seems even the lotto officials are left in the dark in usa's version.

but wait not all lotto  is gov ran any more is is it? its  private companies.  why should there be laws   making oyu reveal idientity to a private corp?

sure the statew needs to know, they need to know when u sell a peice of gold worth more than $500, but private  companies?

2014 = -1016; 2015= -1409; 2016 JAN = -106; FEB= -81; MAR= -131; APR= - 87: MAY= -91; JUN= -39; JUL=-134; AUG= -124; SEP = -123; OCT= -84  NOV=- 73 TOT= -3498

keno historic = -2291 ; 2015= -603; 2016= JAN=-32, FEB= +12 , MAR= -86, APR = -77. MAY= -48, JUN= -29, JUL=-71; AUG = -52; SEPT= -43; OCT = +56 NOV = -33 TOT= -3297

    Avatar
    Kentucky
    United States
    Member #32652
    February 14, 2006
    7295 Posts
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    Posted: January 10, 2012, 7:10 pm - IP Logged

    Whomever purchased the ticket came within an hour and 50 minutes of having the ticket expire and watched the annuity value drop by $2.2 million. Had the ticket been validated exactly the same way two weeks after the drawing, there would be no news story. The real question is why wait until the last hour to cash; the identity of the person who actually bought the ticket is not important unless the ticket was stolen or maybe purchased by an illegal alien.

    If the Lottery doesn't pay, the law firm will sue and be might be asked to prove how the ticket was purchased. It's very strange that is was necessary for a NY lawyer to sign for the trust when it was made by Iowa law firm.

      JAP69's avatar - alas
      South Carolina
      United States
      Member #6
      November 4, 2001
      8790 Posts
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      Posted: January 10, 2012, 7:14 pm - IP Logged

      They declined to identify the gender of the person or whether the individual paid with cash or debit card. (Credit cards may not be used to buy lottery tickets.)

      So if they find out it was purchased with a debit card what then.

      I see it was a N.Y. lawyer. What if the ticket was purchased in Iowa and mailed to the person in N.Y.?

      WHATT

        JAP69's avatar - alas
        South Carolina
        United States
        Member #6
        November 4, 2001
        8790 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: January 10, 2012, 7:31 pm - IP Logged

        They declined to identify the gender of the person or whether the individual paid with cash or debit card. (Credit cards may not be used to buy lottery tickets.)

        So if they find out it was purchased with a debit card what then.

        I see it was a N.Y. lawyer. What if the ticket was purchased in Iowa and mailed to the person in N.Y.?

        Might be a touchy area of law if it was purchased by someone other than the owner of the ticket and mailed to the owner of the ticket.

        http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00001302----000-.html

        WHATT

          maringoman's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcTbRxpKQmOfcCoUqF2FyqIOAwDo7rg9G-lfJLAALPGWJWwiz19eRw
          Massachusetts
          United States
          Member #37433
          April 14, 2006
          2747 Posts
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          Posted: January 10, 2012, 9:25 pm - IP Logged

          The purchaser is so stupid. All this drama they brought it unto themselves. I always thought a month or two

          is reasonable time to wait before claiming jp but 2 hours to the expiry? and then to add to the confusion,

          Einstein is trying to hide behind a trust. Yes dummy, that appears very fishy. This is getting more and more

          bizarre.

          That money's gone fo ever

            RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
            mid-Ohio
            United States
            Member #9
            March 24, 2001
            19813 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: January 10, 2012, 9:41 pm - IP Logged

            The purchaser is so stupid. All this drama they brought it unto themselves. I always thought a month or two

            is reasonable time to wait before claiming jp but 2 hours to the expiry? and then to add to the confusion,

            Einstein is trying to hide behind a trust. Yes dummy, that appears very fishy. This is getting more and more

            bizarre.

            If the state want winners to claim their prizes within two months then they should change the rules.  Some states only allow six months.

             * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
               
                         Evil Looking       

              maringoman's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcTbRxpKQmOfcCoUqF2FyqIOAwDo7rg9G-lfJLAALPGWJWwiz19eRw
              Massachusetts
              United States
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              April 14, 2006
              2747 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: January 10, 2012, 10:02 pm - IP Logged

              If the state want winners to claim their prizes within two months then they should change the rules.  Some states only allow six months.

              My bad. I guess what I meant was if you do it within the first two months, not too many eyebrows will be raised. 

              The ticket owner seems to want privacy and anonymity but now they won't get that. Even people who don't

              care for things like these are curious.

              That money's gone fo ever

                sully16's avatar - sharan
                Ringleader
                Michigan
                United States
                Member #81740
                October 28, 2009
                40248 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: January 10, 2012, 10:10 pm - IP Logged

                This is a very strange story.

                Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

                For a lead role in a cage?

                 

                                                            From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

                  Avatar
                  New Member
                  Youngstown, Oh
                  United States
                  Member #73257
                  April 9, 2009
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                  Posted: January 10, 2012, 11:11 pm - IP Logged

                  We all have to look at it from the winner's point of view, winning a decent size jackpot of this size is a very life changing event and can cause an array of ; should I and shouldn't I; thoughts to occur. It's probably taken them a year to finally grasp the concept of being newly found wealth and get over the jitters of being new money. By being said, it shows that now being able to over come the temptation of claiming for a year that once the funds are deposited into their account they are more likely able to hold back from blowing their millions. Just my opinion.

                    rdgrnr's avatar - walt
                    Way back up in them dadgum hills, son!
                    United States
                    Member #73904
                    April 28, 2009
                    14903 Posts
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                    Posted: January 10, 2012, 11:48 pm - IP Logged

                    If the state want winners to claim their prizes within two months then they should change the rules.  Some states only allow six months.

                    Roger that. The winner shouldn't have to be jumping through hoops when he's following the rules.

                    Unless they have evidence of criminal activity and not just the usual weirdoes claiming it's their ticket with no proof, they should give the man his money posthaste.

                      Cletu$2's avatar - Lottery-050.jpg
                      S.E.Iowa
                      United States
                      Member #120504
                      December 21, 2011
                      534 Posts
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                      Posted: January 11, 2012, 12:32 am - IP Logged

                      Roger that. The winner shouldn't have to be jumping through hoops when he's following the rules.

                      Unless they have evidence of criminal activity and not just the usual weirdoes claiming it's their ticket with no proof, they should give the man his money posthaste.

                      I Agree!   I think they were convinced that nobody was going to claim the jackpot and they had the idea that they could keep it.And then somebody threw a wrench into the works and had the odasity to claim it.Now they are scrambling around looking for loopholes so they don't have to pay up.At least that's my take on the situation.

                        Avatar
                        NY
                        United States
                        Member #23835
                        October 16, 2005
                        3471 Posts
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                        Posted: January 11, 2012, 1:04 am - IP Logged

                        Roger that. The winner shouldn't have to be jumping through hoops when he's following the rules.

                        Unless they have evidence of criminal activity and not just the usual weirdoes claiming it's their ticket with no proof, they should give the man his money posthaste.

                        Yup. As soon as they have an individual claiming to be the owner of the ticket they should write a check just like Texas did when Willis Willis' ticket was presented for payment.


                          United States
                          Member #111442
                          May 25, 2011
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                          Posted: January 11, 2012, 2:33 am - IP Logged

                          Mmmmmmmm............its good to have drama. Be it a pretty dull world  Sleep    if everyone did exactly what they were supposed to do. Doting all those i's crossing all those T's. If it get's people's attention, scratching their heads, getting some people pissed off.......... more power to them.     Hurray!

                            OldSchoolPa's avatar - Lottery-057.jpg
                            Gurnee, Illinois
                            United States
                            Member #49731
                            February 12, 2007
                            917 Posts
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                            Posted: January 11, 2012, 7:39 am - IP Logged

                            Roger that. The winner shouldn't have to be jumping through hoops when he's following the rules.

                            Unless they have evidence of criminal activity and not just the usual weirdoes claiming it's their ticket with no proof, they should give the man his money posthaste.

                            But you have to admit this is a bit wacky.  Almost suspicious given that the person waited until the last day to claim in this manner. It would lead me and most reasonable people to suspect something is amiss in this case.  But as I understand it, all the person has to do is come forward to this investigator.  He or she will not be unnecessarily exposed to the media.  Besides, everyone knows who Brad Duke is and where he lives and he is having no problems.  Let me win and I could go either way, claim it anonymously or have a huge press conference with me showing up in a flashy stretch limosine with streamers and signs proclaiming, "JUST WON THE LOTTERY!"  When the begging commences, I have an easy solution for all of it..."a polite sorry but check with your bank for that as I am not in that business".....followed by a move to an undisclosed address in the US and frequent travel around the world. 

                            Now come on Powerball, give me some HOPE and drastic CHANGE for my 2012 bank account balance!

                            Just say NO to DRUGS and Obama in 2012...or just quit drinking the Kool-Aid...it's spiked!

                            Get MONEY!!! Winning a JACKPOT lottery is all the HOPE and CHANGE I desire!!!  NOW give me MONEY!US Flag

                            The guy who won the presidency in 2008 really won the lottery...he is now millions richer, travels in first class style, and even has a staff that would be the envy of the richest Powerball winner (she has a staff of 2). Every night he goes to sleep, he probably plays the close of Dave Chappelle's Show: I'm rich beyatch!