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Court: Police can collect $1M lottery prize

Topic closed. 34 replies. Last post 4 years ago by haymaker.

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NY
United States
Member #23835
October 16, 2005
3474 Posts
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Posted: July 16, 2012, 9:56 pm - IP Logged

If they were going to take the money, it should have gone back toward prizes for legit players.

Giving it to the cops is only going to aggravate a very unpleasant trend in them looking for excuses to take/keep property. Disapprove

Why should the proceeds of a legitimate prize won with a legitimate ticket go back to the lottery? There was nothing wrong with the ticket. It was the money used to buy the ticket that was a problem. The lottery was paid for the ticket by the store that sold it, and the store, assuming they accepted the card in good faith, was paid by the credit card company. If she had bought a car and the dealer was paid would you think the dealer was entitled to take the car back and sell it again at a 2nd 50% markup?

Unless the dead woman's estate paid the credit card  company for all of the unauthorized debt, there's absolutely no rational reason that her estate has a cclaim on any merchandise that was *stolen* by using the card.

If the credit card company wasn't paid back they should be the legitimate owner of any recovered merchandise that was fraudulently bought with the card. Since they don't seem to have asked for the prize there's only one option left.

If she had bought a car or a house with money gained from a crime the state gets to take it. Other people may think differently, but I think that not letting criminals benefit from their crimes makes sense.

    time*treat's avatar - radar

    United States
    Member #13130
    March 30, 2005
    2171 Posts
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    Posted: July 17, 2012, 12:47 am - IP Logged

    Why should the proceeds of a legitimate prize won with a legitimate ticket go back to the lottery? There was nothing wrong with the ticket. It was the money used to buy the ticket that was a problem. The lottery was paid for the ticket by the store that sold it, and the store, assuming they accepted the card in good faith, was paid by the credit card company. If she had bought a car and the dealer was paid would you think the dealer was entitled to take the car back and sell it again at a 2nd 50% markup?

    Unless the dead woman's estate paid the credit card  company for all of the unauthorized debt, there's absolutely no rational reason that her estate has a cclaim on any merchandise that was *stolen* by using the card.

    If the credit card company wasn't paid back they should be the legitimate owner of any recovered merchandise that was fraudulently bought with the card. Since they don't seem to have asked for the prize there's only one option left.

    If she had bought a car or a house with money gained from a crime the state gets to take it. Other people may think differently, but I think that not letting criminals benefit from their crimes makes sense.

    Why should the proceeds of a legitimate prize won with a legitimate ticket go back to the lottery?

    Because if the prize is not "legitimate" enough to be awarded to someone, the money should go back to where it came from.

     

    If she had bought a car or a house with money gained from a crime the state gets to take it.

    The states are regularly using/abusing these same laws to steal cash, cars, and property from people who AREN'T criminals. They take property and declare it guilty until proven innocent and force you to pay all manner of fees to try to get it back. Just last week, I blogged about a case in D.C.

     

    I think that not letting criminals benefit from their crimes makes sense.

    Does that include state employees?

    In neo-conned Amerika, bank robs you.
    Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms should be the name of a convenience store, not a govnoment agency.

      dallascowboyfan's avatar - tiana the-princess-and-the-frog.jpg
      Oklahoma
      United States
      Member #82391
      November 12, 2009
      6290 Posts
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      Posted: July 17, 2012, 11:30 am - IP Logged

      It takes a while sometimes, dallas, but eventually we catch on to the hiding stuff in the trunk routine, lol.

      LOL Ridge; I'm not as slick as I use to be in my younger yearsWink, I use to hide them in the boys room & my hubby decided to help them clean there closet(a girl can't get a break)Green laugh I need to come up with a better hiding place I was thiinking about the attic but he would really call for an interventionROFL

      I Love Pink & Green 1908

        maximumfun's avatar - Lottery-030.jpg
        Lavender Rocket

        United States
        Member #124616
        March 16, 2012
        2642 Posts
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        Posted: July 18, 2012, 3:06 pm - IP Logged

        LOL Ridge; I'm not as slick as I use to be in my younger yearsWink, I use to hide them in the boys room & my hubby decided to help them clean there closet(a girl can't get a break)Green laugh I need to come up with a better hiding place I was thiinking about the attic but he would really call for an interventionROFL

        you could do what my sister does... she actually has rented a storage unit... where she keeps her 'purchases'... i have LONG given up trying to figure out this logic...

          haymaker's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
          Egg Harbor twp.south Jersey shore
          United States
          Member #112968
          June 29, 2011
          3856 Posts
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          Posted: July 18, 2012, 3:28 pm - IP Logged

          you could do what my sister does... she actually has rented a storage unit... where she keeps her 'purchases'... i have LONG given up trying to figure out this logic...

          Try this logic when hiding teenager's christmas presents.

          put them in the back of the pickup truck,

          no self respecting teen would look back there, cause there might be work in there.  LOL

          Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds    -- Charles Mackay  LL.D.