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Ohio Lottery investigating frequent winners

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The top lottery winners in Ohio have claimed hundreds of large prizes over the past decades, some in such short spans of time that it seemingly defies the odds and has prompted investigations by the Ohio Lottery.

State lottery investigators track multiple-winners to look for retailers who are either stealing prizes for themselves or store employees turning in tickets for others wanting to avoid paying off debts.

A local newspaper examined every prize claim of $600 or more going back to the launch of the Ohio Lottery in the mid-1970s, a database that showed 13 people have claimed more than 100 prizes each.

That investigation also found the most frequent Ohio winner, a Cleveland man, has claimed more than 300 prizes since 2008, for a total of more than $800,000.

The Ohio Lottery tracks such multiple winners to look for retailers who are stealing prizes or taking a cut to redeem winning tickets for customers who want to avoid paying taxes, child support or other debts.

The paper examined every prize claim of $600 or more back to the lottery's launch in the 1970s.

The Ohio Attorney General has collected nearly $8.4 million in back taxes and debts from lottery prizes since 2003. The lottery's received some $2.8 million in child support from prize winners since 2001.

The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

  1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
  2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
  3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
  4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
  5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

In the most obvious form of abuse that the Lottery Commission seeks to curtail, retailers have at times stolen prizes for themselves. In another method, not illegal but against Lottery Commission rules, store employees have at times turned in tickets for the actual winners when the real winners do not want it known that they have won in order to avoid paying child support or other debts. Those individuals can make a small profit by paying a discount for the ticket, allowing the real winner to avoid paying child support, taxes or other debt. The practice is referred to as "discounting" by the lottery commission.

Retailers caught discounting could lose their ability to sell tickets, but lottery officials said discounting is not a criminal offense.

For regular, individual players the legality of discounting is less clear.

"The lottery's position is that players taking measures to avoid a court order is unlawful," Marie Kilbane, spokeswoman for that Ohio Lottery said. "However the answer on the legality of discounting beyond that is unclear."

It's not illegal for regular players to give their ticket to someone else to turn in, but they could be subject to broader criminal charges like defrauding a creditor, based on the specifics of the case, Attorney General's office spokesman Dan Tierney said.

"I can't say in all cases that this is a crime or this isn't a crime," he said. "It would be up to a local prosecutor to determine."

Edward Blain, of the northern-Ohio village of Nova, has claimed more than 150 prizes of more than $1,000 each in the past two decades. Interviewed this week, Blain said he's never engaged in discounting but said other lottery players have told him that they avoided debt collection by going to a store that will discount.

"If you win $5,000, they'll give you $3,200 in cash and then go turn it in for you," he said. The difference usually covers the taxes on the prize with a little left over for the discounter's pocket. Blain said he doesn't know specific stores that offer this service.

Odds are against big profits

The most frequent winner in the state is Rickey Meng of Cleveland. Meng has claimed more than 300 prizes of more than $600 in less than six years.

Two thirds of those prizes have been won playing Pick 4 with about $700,000 of his total $820,000 in pre-tax winnings coming from that game.

"At best, that game has odds of about one in 2,000," said Bill Notz, a professor in the statistics department at Ohio State University.

Meng didn't return multiple phone calls seeking comment for this story. Lottery officials confirmed that he isn't a retailer.

If someone wanted even odds to win that game 300 times, Notz said, they would have to play about 600,000 times — or more than 270 times per day over six years.

"This all changes when you talk about the odds of someone winning," as opposed to a specific person winning, Notz said. "With lots and lots of people playing the lottery regularly, a few of them are going to do tremendously well."

It's possible that the top winners in the state are those lucky few, he said, but they would need to be playing almost daily and spending a lot of money.

"My guess is that you wouldn't come out ahead," Notz said.

Assuming more than 200 tickets are purchased daily at the $1 bet level, an individual would likely spend more than $400,000 to possibly win double that amount over six years.

If someone has early success, Notz said, then they have money to put toward more tickets and continue the streak.

But the odds of some of the streaks seen in Ohio are even steeper.

The lottery lists the odds of winning a straight Pick 4 — exactly matching all four numbers — at one in 10,000.

Ticket's claimed by Meng have matched all four numbers on that game 165 times since 2008, claiming prizes of either $2,500 or $5,000 each, depending on the bet. That's a total of $600,000 in winnings from those matches.

The odds say he'd likely have to purchase more than 1.6 million tickets to achieve those results at a cost of at least $825,000, Notz said.

Cole Barker of Springfield is the second luckiest lottery winner in Clark County. He's claimed 62 prizes of $600 or more over the years, including a $2 million win in 2011. The top winner in Clark County has claimed 69 prizes.

Barker confirmed that the only way to win that many prizes is to buy a lot of tickets.

"Everybody tells me I'm lucky," he said. He said he played almost every day during his streaks. The day he hit $2 million he had spent $40.

Barker, a technology coordinator at Greenon Local Schools, said he's bought a house and a boat in Florida with his winnings where he and his wife plan to eventually retire.

He's never had anyone ask him to turn in a ticket for them.

"I owe enough to the IRS, so I'm not going to do that for someone," he said.

Lottery investigates retailers

Lottery rules say people who win between $600 and $5,000 must fill out a claim form and can receive the cash at numerous banking locations with proper photo ID.

Claims of less than $600 don't require a form to be completed in order to receive a payout so records aren't available for those prizes.

Those who win more than $5,000 or who win prizes from Mega Millions, Powerball or Classic Lotto must contact the nearest regional lottery office to submit a claim form.

The winner's name, Social Security number and other identifiers are run through several state and national systems to determine if he or she owes any debts, which will be deducted from the prize total before it is awarded, lottery spokeswoman Danielle Frizzi-Babb said.

The Ohio Lottery has collected more than $2.8 million in child support from prize winners since 2001. The Attorney General's office has received nearly $8.4 million in back taxes and other debts from lottery prizes since that collection began in 2003.

Some wishing to avoid forking over their winnings try to fill out the claim form using a friend or family member's name, said Such Patel, who owns the Plum Food Mart in Springfield along with his brother Paresh Patel.

They've never had anyone ask them to claim a ticket in exchange for payment, Such Patel said.

The lottery's Retailer Compliance Inspection Program has the authority to investigate store owners or employees suspected of discounting, Frizzi-Babb said, but they don't have the power to police individual players.

Winners don't have to prove that they purchased a ticket in order to claim it, she said, and it's legal to give a winning lottery ticket to someone else as a gift.

Lottery investigators also do random and complaint-based checks to make sure retailers aren't stealing winnings by telling customers they won less than the total prize amount or by saying a ticket wasn't a winner and turning it in themselves.

Thefts are reported by the lottery to local law enforcement for criminal prosecution, Frizzi-Babb said.

Since 2010, they've performed an average of 100 stings per year at lottery retailers statewide that have resulted in nearly 50 arrests. Dozens of Southwest Ohio clerks have been caught stealing from winners by undercover investigators.

With the exception of pending cases, every arrest statewide has resulted in a plea of guilty or no contest with most being sentenced to probation, community service and fines.

Frequent wins by retailers a red flag

Two of the most prolific winners in Ohio lottery history have owned stores where lottery tickets are sold.

Retailers and clerks are required to indicate that they own or work in a lottery location when they claim their prizes and frequent wins can prompt an investigation.

Manojkumar Patel is a former convenience store owner who says he got lucky playing unwanted tickets customers rejected because they had errors.

He's claimed nearly 200 winning tickets since 1996, totalling more than $700,000, according to lottery records. That makes him the third winningest player in Ohio. Three of his family members have claimed dozens of tickets also, totalling an additional $200,000 over two decades.

But Patel said his family spent just as much on tickets as they won, and over the years he pretty much broke even.

While he owned Mike's Convenient Food Mart in Cleveland Heights, Patel said he was approached by at least one customer asking to turn in a ticket for him.

"One customer had won like $10,000 on an instant ticket," he said. The man owed money for alimony and child support, and asked to cash the ticket in Patel's name.

"I said, 'I can't cash that for you, that's yours,' " Patel said. "Why would I do that? I don't want to pay the taxes."

But the high number of claims Patel made — 163 between April 2005 and November 2010 — prompted an investigation by the lottery's security department.

"If a winner has claimed more than one or several large prizes within a small window of time, claims will notice a pattern and alert security," Frizzi-Babb said.

The lottery's investigation could include a review of surveillance footage to confirm that the person claiming those tickets actually purchased them.

In Patel's case, undercover investigators went to his store four times, but they didn't find any evidence that he was discounting.

"I was not doing anything wrong," Patel said. He said his store generated more than $40 million for the Ohio Lottery during the time that he owned it.

Samuel Sliman of Canton, who owns several businesses including a drive-through, according to Stark County property records, has claimed 217 lottery prizes of $600 or more since 2001 for winnings of more than $670,000.

He got on the lottery's radar in 2007 when he won 10 prizes of $20,800 on Pick 4 tickets over an eight day span.

Earlier this year an undercover investigator went to his store to test if the clerk would pay a winning ticket correctly.

The store was found to be in compliance and the clerk didn't offer to buy the ticket.

Sliman did not return multiple calls for comment, but told a lottery investigator in an interview last month that he plays Pick 4 a lot, sometimes twice a day. He has not won a prize over $10,000 since that 2007 streak.

"Sliman stated that he was aware of (discounting and theft issues) but would never put himself in a position to jeopardize his business or his reputation in the community," according to investigative notes.

The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

  1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
  2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
  3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
  4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
  5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

Dayton Daily News

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23 comments. Last comment 2 years ago by GAman03.
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Avatar
backwoods ga
United States
Member #155844
May 31, 2014
1893 Posts
Offline
Posted: September 15, 2014, 8:31 am - IP Logged

Seems like everystate trying to investigate winners now.  Must be  a start of a Country wide campaign..

    IPlayWeekly's avatar - avatarmoney
    Columbus, Ohio
    United States
    Member #128906
    June 5, 2012
    592 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: September 15, 2014, 9:16 am - IP Logged

    All these winners in my state and I can't break more than 35, lol.

      Jani Norman's avatar - fiftyways
      OHIO
      United States
      Member #4164
      March 27, 2004
      14586 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:04 am - IP Logged

      The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

      1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
      2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
      3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
      4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
      5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

      ==========================================================

       

      All I can say is it's about time, a poor man does not stand a chance, with all these swindlers.....

      This is just a tip of the iceberg, there are others out there, Ohio is as bad a Florida....

      "I am what I am by the grace of God."

      Kitfany

      http://www.ohiolottery.com/

        Avatar
        Kentucky
        United States
        Member #32652
        February 14, 2006
        7314 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:24 am - IP Logged

        The top lottery winners in Ohio have claimed hundreds of large prizes over the past decades, some in such short spans of time that it seemingly defies the odds and has prompted investigations by the Ohio Lottery.

        State lottery investigators track multiple-winners to look for retailers who are either stealing prizes for themselves or store employees turning in tickets for others wanting to avoid paying off debts.

        A local newspaper examined every prize claim of $600 or more going back to the launch of the Ohio Lottery in the mid-1970s, a database that showed 13 people have claimed more than 100 prizes each.

        That investigation also found the most frequent Ohio winner, a Cleveland man, has claimed more than 300 prizes since 2008, for a total of more than $800,000.

        The Ohio Lottery tracks such multiple winners to look for retailers who are stealing prizes or taking a cut to redeem winning tickets for customers who want to avoid paying taxes, child support or other debts.

        The paper examined every prize claim of $600 or more back to the lottery's launch in the 1970s.

        The Ohio Attorney General has collected nearly $8.4 million in back taxes and debts from lottery prizes since 2003. The lottery's received some $2.8 million in child support from prize winners since 2001.

        The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

        1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
        2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
        3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
        4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
        5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

        In the most obvious form of abuse that the Lottery Commission seeks to curtail, retailers have at times stolen prizes for themselves. In another method, not illegal but against Lottery Commission rules, store employees have at times turned in tickets for the actual winners when the real winners do not want it known that they have won in order to avoid paying child support or other debts. Those individuals can make a small profit by paying a discount for the ticket, allowing the real winner to avoid paying child support, taxes or other debt. The practice is referred to as "discounting" by the lottery commission.

        Retailers caught discounting could lose their ability to sell tickets, but lottery officials said discounting is not a criminal offense.

        For regular, individual players the legality of discounting is less clear.

        "The lottery's position is that players taking measures to avoid a court order is unlawful," Marie Kilbane, spokeswoman for that Ohio Lottery said. "However the answer on the legality of discounting beyond that is unclear."

        It's not illegal for regular players to give their ticket to someone else to turn in, but they could be subject to broader criminal charges like defrauding a creditor, based on the specifics of the case, Attorney General's office spokesman Dan Tierney said.

        "I can't say in all cases that this is a crime or this isn't a crime," he said. "It would be up to a local prosecutor to determine."

        Edward Blain, of the northern-Ohio village of Nova, has claimed more than 150 prizes of more than $1,000 each in the past two decades. Interviewed this week, Blain said he's never engaged in discounting but said other lottery players have told him that they avoided debt collection by going to a store that will discount.

        "If you win $5,000, they'll give you $3,200 in cash and then go turn it in for you," he said. The difference usually covers the taxes on the prize with a little left over for the discounter's pocket. Blain said he doesn't know specific stores that offer this service.

        Odds are against big profits

        The most frequent winner in the state is Rickey Meng of Cleveland. Meng has claimed more than 300 prizes of more than $600 in less than six years.

        Two thirds of those prizes have been won playing Pick 4 with about $700,000 of his total $820,000 in pre-tax winnings coming from that game.

        "At best, that game has odds of about one in 2,000," said Bill Notz, a professor in the statistics department at Ohio State University.

        Meng didn't return multiple phone calls seeking comment for this story. Lottery officials confirmed that he isn't a retailer.

        If someone wanted even odds to win that game 300 times, Notz said, they would have to play about 600,000 times — or more than 270 times per day over six years.

        "This all changes when you talk about the odds of someone winning," as opposed to a specific person winning, Notz said. "With lots and lots of people playing the lottery regularly, a few of them are going to do tremendously well."

        It's possible that the top winners in the state are those lucky few, he said, but they would need to be playing almost daily and spending a lot of money.

        "My guess is that you wouldn't come out ahead," Notz said.

        Assuming more than 200 tickets are purchased daily at the $1 bet level, an individual would likely spend more than $400,000 to possibly win double that amount over six years.

        If someone has early success, Notz said, then they have money to put toward more tickets and continue the streak.

        But the odds of some of the streaks seen in Ohio are even steeper.

        The lottery lists the odds of winning a straight Pick 4 — exactly matching all four numbers — at one in 10,000.

        Ticket's claimed by Meng have matched all four numbers on that game 165 times since 2008, claiming prizes of either $2,500 or $5,000 each, depending on the bet. That's a total of $600,000 in winnings from those matches.

        The odds say he'd likely have to purchase more than 1.6 million tickets to achieve those results at a cost of at least $825,000, Notz said.

        Cole Barker of Springfield is the second luckiest lottery winner in Clark County. He's claimed 62 prizes of $600 or more over the years, including a $2 million win in 2011. The top winner in Clark County has claimed 69 prizes.

        Barker confirmed that the only way to win that many prizes is to buy a lot of tickets.

        "Everybody tells me I'm lucky," he said. He said he played almost every day during his streaks. The day he hit $2 million he had spent $40.

        Barker, a technology coordinator at Greenon Local Schools, said he's bought a house and a boat in Florida with his winnings where he and his wife plan to eventually retire.

        He's never had anyone ask him to turn in a ticket for them.

        "I owe enough to the IRS, so I'm not going to do that for someone," he said.

        Lottery investigates retailers

        Lottery rules say people who win between $600 and $5,000 must fill out a claim form and can receive the cash at numerous banking locations with proper photo ID.

        Claims of less than $600 don't require a form to be completed in order to receive a payout so records aren't available for those prizes.

        Those who win more than $5,000 or who win prizes from Mega Millions, Powerball or Classic Lotto must contact the nearest regional lottery office to submit a claim form.

        The winner's name, Social Security number and other identifiers are run through several state and national systems to determine if he or she owes any debts, which will be deducted from the prize total before it is awarded, lottery spokeswoman Danielle Frizzi-Babb said.

        The Ohio Lottery has collected more than $2.8 million in child support from prize winners since 2001. The Attorney General's office has received nearly $8.4 million in back taxes and other debts from lottery prizes since that collection began in 2003.

        Some wishing to avoid forking over their winnings try to fill out the claim form using a friend or family member's name, said Such Patel, who owns the Plum Food Mart in Springfield along with his brother Paresh Patel.

        They've never had anyone ask them to claim a ticket in exchange for payment, Such Patel said.

        The lottery's Retailer Compliance Inspection Program has the authority to investigate store owners or employees suspected of discounting, Frizzi-Babb said, but they don't have the power to police individual players.

        Winners don't have to prove that they purchased a ticket in order to claim it, she said, and it's legal to give a winning lottery ticket to someone else as a gift.

        Lottery investigators also do random and complaint-based checks to make sure retailers aren't stealing winnings by telling customers they won less than the total prize amount or by saying a ticket wasn't a winner and turning it in themselves.

        Thefts are reported by the lottery to local law enforcement for criminal prosecution, Frizzi-Babb said.

        Since 2010, they've performed an average of 100 stings per year at lottery retailers statewide that have resulted in nearly 50 arrests. Dozens of Southwest Ohio clerks have been caught stealing from winners by undercover investigators.

        With the exception of pending cases, every arrest statewide has resulted in a plea of guilty or no contest with most being sentenced to probation, community service and fines.

        Frequent wins by retailers a red flag

        Two of the most prolific winners in Ohio lottery history have owned stores where lottery tickets are sold.

        Retailers and clerks are required to indicate that they own or work in a lottery location when they claim their prizes and frequent wins can prompt an investigation.

        Manojkumar Patel is a former convenience store owner who says he got lucky playing unwanted tickets customers rejected because they had errors.

        He's claimed nearly 200 winning tickets since 1996, totalling more than $700,000, according to lottery records. That makes him the third winningest player in Ohio. Three of his family members have claimed dozens of tickets also, totalling an additional $200,000 over two decades.

        But Patel said his family spent just as much on tickets as they won, and over the years he pretty much broke even.

        While he owned Mike's Convenient Food Mart in Cleveland Heights, Patel said he was approached by at least one customer asking to turn in a ticket for him.

        "One customer had won like $10,000 on an instant ticket," he said. The man owed money for alimony and child support, and asked to cash the ticket in Patel's name.

        "I said, 'I can't cash that for you, that's yours,' " Patel said. "Why would I do that? I don't want to pay the taxes."

        But the high number of claims Patel made — 163 between April 2005 and November 2010 — prompted an investigation by the lottery's security department.

        "If a winner has claimed more than one or several large prizes within a small window of time, claims will notice a pattern and alert security," Frizzi-Babb said.

        The lottery's investigation could include a review of surveillance footage to confirm that the person claiming those tickets actually purchased them.

        In Patel's case, undercover investigators went to his store four times, but they didn't find any evidence that he was discounting.

        "I was not doing anything wrong," Patel said. He said his store generated more than $40 million for the Ohio Lottery during the time that he owned it.

        Samuel Sliman of Canton, who owns several businesses including a drive-through, according to Stark County property records, has claimed 217 lottery prizes of $600 or more since 2001 for winnings of more than $670,000.

        He got on the lottery's radar in 2007 when he won 10 prizes of $20,800 on Pick 4 tickets over an eight day span.

        Earlier this year an undercover investigator went to his store to test if the clerk would pay a winning ticket correctly.

        The store was found to be in compliance and the clerk didn't offer to buy the ticket.

        Sliman did not return multiple calls for comment, but told a lottery investigator in an interview last month that he plays Pick 4 a lot, sometimes twice a day. He has not won a prize over $10,000 since that 2007 streak.

        "Sliman stated that he was aware of (discounting and theft issues) but would never put himself in a position to jeopardize his business or his reputation in the community," according to investigative notes.

        The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

        1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
        2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
        3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
        4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
        5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

        The top lottery winners in Ohio have claimed hundreds of large prizes over the past decades, some in such short spans of time that it seemingly defies the odds and has prompted investigations by the Ohio Lottery.

        It's amazing that nobody working for the Ohio Lottery has figured out that some of their retailers are simply cashing tickets for their customers and they did it since the mid-1970s. These "investigators" aren't using any common sense if they believe someone cashed more than 300 stolen prizes too.

        Two thirds of those prizes have been won playing Pick 4 with about $700,000 of his total $820,000 in pre-tax winnings coming from that game. "At best, that game has odds of about one in 2,000," said Bill Notz, a professor in the statistics department at Ohio State University.

        Either somebody misquoted Notz or the professor doesn't know any pick-4 combination with four different digits has a one in 416.67 chance. My guess is whomever wrote this article has very little lottery knowledge.

        Samuel Sliman of Canton, who owns several businesses including a drive-through, according to Stark County property records, has claimed 217 lottery prizes of $600 or more since 2001 for winnings of more than $670,000. He got on the lottery's radar in 2007 when he won 10 prizes of $20,800 on Pick 4 tickets over an eight day span.

        It looks like somebody was playing pick-4 numbers $4 straight and $4 box and got very lucky or played $40 straight and $40 box and cashed tickets on different days.

        Cole Barker of Springfield is the second luckiest lottery winner in Clark County. He's claimed 62 prizes of $600 or more over the years, including a $2 million win in 2011. The top winner in Clark County has claimed 69 prizes. Barker confirmed that the only way to win that many prizes is to buy a lot of tickets. The day he hit $2 million he had spent $40.

        I have some friends that were hooked on $5 slot machines and one year had over $100,000 in gambling winnings on W-2Gs even though they lost money. They used a player card so they did have a record of their losses. My point is, not everybody plays just 50 cent back-up tickets and had the author of this article done the research, they would know there are players who cash many more tickets valued over $600 simply because they buy more tickets.

          RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
          mid-Ohio
          United States
          Member #9
          March 24, 2001
          19830 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:27 am - IP Logged

          "....the high number of claims Patel made — 163 between April 2005 and November 2010 — prompted an investigation by the lottery's security department."

          With all the Patels around the country involved in lottery scams, the fact that he was a Patel should have been enough to prompt an investigation.

           * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
             
                       Evil Looking       

            Avatar
            Kentucky
            United States
            Member #32652
            February 14, 2006
            7314 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:27 am - IP Logged

            The most prolific lottery winners in Ohio

            1. Rickey Meng, Cleveland, Ohio; 302 claims since 2008.
            2. Samuel J. Sliman, Canton, Ohio; 217 claims since 2001.
            3. Manojkumar Patel, Highland Heights, Ohio; 199 claims since 1996.
            4. Nimer M. Abuhamdeh, Westlake, Ohio; 185 claims since 1996.
            5. James R. Bennett, Polk, Ohio; 160 claims since 2009.

            ==========================================================

             

            All I can say is it's about time, a poor man does not stand a chance, with all these swindlers.....

            This is just a tip of the iceberg, there are others out there, Ohio is as bad a Florida....

            Why are you assuming these five people are criminals?

              Avatar
              Kentucky
              United States
              Member #32652
              February 14, 2006
              7314 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:33 am - IP Logged

              "....the high number of claims Patel made — 163 between April 2005 and November 2010 — prompted an investigation by the lottery's security department."

              With all the Patels around the country involved in lottery scams, the fact that he was a Patel should have been enough to prompt an investigation.

              The name "Patel" is about as common as "Smith, Jones, or Brown" and many of the convenient stores are owned by members of the Patel family. It's probably more unlikely not to see the name "Patel" on a list of lottery winners over $600.

                RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
                mid-Ohio
                United States
                Member #9
                March 24, 2001
                19830 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: September 15, 2014, 10:42 am - IP Logged

                The name "Patel" is about as common as "Smith, Jones, or Brown" and many of the convenient stores are owned by members of the Patel family. It's probably more unlikely not to see the name "Patel" on a list of lottery winners over $600.

                "Smith, Jones, and Brown" names may be as common as "Patel" but I don't recall any of those names being involved with lottery scams.  What are the odds?

                 * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
                   
                             Evil Looking       

                  Avatar
                  Georgia
                  United States
                  Member #158146
                  August 13, 2014
                  76 Posts
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                  Posted: September 15, 2014, 1:30 pm - IP Logged

                  OMg! This is crazy! lol

                  I am not surprised if these stores has thousands of dollars of winners. It's as tempting as working for the federal reserve. When you have stacks of money laid before you everyday, you can only contain the urge for so long.

                    Jani Norman's avatar - fiftyways
                    OHIO
                    United States
                    Member #4164
                    March 27, 2004
                    14586 Posts
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                    Posted: September 15, 2014, 1:38 pm - IP Logged

                    "Smith, Jones, and Brown" names may be as common as "Patel" but I don't recall any of those names being involved with lottery scams.  What are the odds?

                    I Agree! that's what I agree with......

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                    Kitfany

                    http://www.ohiolottery.com/

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                      Kentucky
                      United States
                      Member #32652
                      February 14, 2006
                      7314 Posts
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                      Posted: September 15, 2014, 11:53 pm - IP Logged

                      "Smith, Jones, and Brown" names may be as common as "Patel" but I don't recall any of those names being involved with lottery scams.  What are the odds?

                      Actually I said the name "Patel" is about as common as "Smith, Jones, or Brown" and I haven't read any evidence where the Patel in this article did something illegal.

                      "What are the odds?"

                      The odds are pretty good that several LP members won't understand how the players spending hundreds a day on scratch-offs, pick-3, and pick-4 tickets will win more of the prizes than $5 a week player. The same people that can't understand how 70% of jackpot winners are QPs when 70% of the tickets sold are QPs.

                      Seriously, I don't see how any state lottery can prevent anyone from buying and cashing a winning ticket $601 to $5000 when the majority of the transactions are done by retailers and more likely one of the store employees.

                        noise-gate's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcR91HDs4UJhjxO7cmeMQWZ5lB_FOcMLOGicau4V74R45tDgPWrr
                        Bay Area - California
                        United States
                        Member #136477
                        December 12, 2012
                        4108 Posts
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                        Posted: September 16, 2014, 12:36 am - IP Logged

                        I have no idea what the California Lottery thinks about " frequent winners"- what l do know is that they take up to 8 weeks to cut a check to a MM/ PB winner. They have been known to confiscate their equipment from convenience stores that screw with the betting public- like cashing a scratcher for less or telling people that their " winning tickets" are really losing tickets.

                          RJOh's avatar - chipmunk
                          mid-Ohio
                          United States
                          Member #9
                          March 24, 2001
                          19830 Posts
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                          Posted: September 16, 2014, 3:09 pm - IP Logged

                          Actually I said the name "Patel" is about as common as "Smith, Jones, or Brown" and I haven't read any evidence where the Patel in this article did something illegal.

                          "What are the odds?"

                          The odds are pretty good that several LP members won't understand how the players spending hundreds a day on scratch-offs, pick-3, and pick-4 tickets will win more of the prizes than $5 a week player. The same people that can't understand how 70% of jackpot winners are QPs when 70% of the tickets sold are QPs.

                          Seriously, I don't see how any state lottery can prevent anyone from buying and cashing a winning ticket $601 to $5000 when the majority of the transactions are done by retailers and more likely one of the store employees.

                          "The odds are pretty good that several LP members won't understand how the players spending hundreds a day on scratch-offs, pick-3, and pick-4 tickets will win more of the prizes than $5 a week player."

                          Obviously the state understands that it's unlikely anyone can afford to spend hundreds a day on scratch-offs, pick-3, and pick-4 tickets and win more per dollars spent than $5 a week players, the odds of winning are the same for all. 

                          It's more likely these pretend winners are discounting the winning tickets of real winners so they can avoid paying back taxes, child support and other obligations and cashing their tickets for them.  The lotteries shouldn't allow organized criminals to use legal state lotteries in their businesses.  It is a crime to aid someone doing something that's illegal.

                           * you don't need to buy more tickets, just buy a winning ticket * 
                             
                                       Evil Looking       

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                            texas
                            United States
                            Member #152324
                            February 11, 2014
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                            Posted: September 16, 2014, 4:00 pm - IP Logged

                            Wow intresting story, well u know the old saying.Money is the root of all evil.I really need some of that root. lol. A dollar or 2 dollars an a dream.