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MUSL employee arrested in Hot Lotto jackpot mystery

Topic closed. 44 replies. Last post 2 years ago by RedStang.

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needinghelp's avatar - voodoo

United States
Member #148261
October 27, 2013
6655 Posts
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Posted: January 16, 2015, 1:05 pm - IP Logged

Conspiracy .. Remember folks the hand is always quicker than the eye.....Never say never..

    needinghelp's avatar - voodoo

    United States
    Member #148261
    October 27, 2013
    6655 Posts
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    Posted: January 16, 2015, 1:10 pm - IP Logged

    Greedy criminals like this give games a bad name....... Lets see if he gets a slap on the wrist...

    Where is the outrage?

      dallascowboyfan's avatar - tiana the-princess-and-the-frog.jpg
      Oklahoma
      United States
      Member #82391
      November 12, 2009
      6290 Posts
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      Posted: January 16, 2015, 2:33 pm - IP Logged

      Mr Tipton go directly to jail do not pass go. Big Grin

      I Love Pink & Green 1908

        Nikkicute's avatar - nnjx1k
        Wisconsin
        United States
        Member #123290
        February 17, 2012
        3048 Posts
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        Posted: January 16, 2015, 5:11 pm - IP Logged

        Don't forget the NY lawyer that tried to validate the ticket hours before the deadline for Hexam Investments Ltd. Nobody could make up story like this no matter how hard they tried.

        I did forget about him!! lol

        Sounds like some weird Monopoly Game, he's going directly to jail !!No Nod

          Artist77's avatar - batman14

          United States
          Member #121745
          January 16, 2012
          4783 Posts
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          Posted: January 16, 2015, 9:16 pm - IP Logged

          The attorney should be disbarred as well.  My guess was that the true winner had been murdered.

          Did anyone on LP guess it was an inside job?

          J'aime La France.

            Avatar
            Left Coast
            United States
            Member #122298
            January 28, 2012
            125 Posts
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            Posted: January 16, 2015, 9:49 pm - IP Logged

            The attorney should be disbarred as well.  My guess was that the true winner had been murdered.

            Did anyone on LP guess it was an inside job?

            My original guess was that the winner wanted to remain completely anonymous -- like doesn't exist, off the grid anonymous. And was able to sell is ticket for $3-5M and disappear and then the buyers have been looking to claim it. 

            My second guess was that it was someone with back taxes, child support or a lottery employee who wanted to stay anonymous.

            I don't think this guy had insider knowledge about the numbers. No conspiracy thoughts on my end. I think he just got lucky once. What's to stop lottery employees from playing and redeeming smaller prizes?

              Avatar
              Nassau
              Bahamas
              Member #3661
              February 9, 2004
              550 Posts
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              Posted: January 17, 2015, 7:58 am - IP Logged

              i think the original winner was murdered an this guy saw the ticket was about to expire so he asked a friend to help him get the cash.  they cook up a plan that led both of them in  jail  i hope. dont think he had nothing to do with the winning ticket, but i think he he knew the ticket is expiring being MUSL employee so he tried to fraud the cash to him an his friend.

              My BelovedHat

                sully16's avatar - sharan
                Ringleader
                Michigan
                United States
                Member #81740
                October 28, 2009
                40250 Posts
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                Posted: January 17, 2015, 8:57 am - IP Logged

                Clerks and lottery officials, the fasted growing criminals in America.

                Did you exchange a walk on part in the war ?

                For a lead role in a cage?

                 

                                                            From Pink Floyd's " Wish you were here"

                  RedStang's avatar - tallman zps6gf4inoc.jpg
                  NY
                  United States
                  Member #121961
                  January 21, 2012
                  3157 Posts
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                  Posted: January 17, 2015, 9:32 am - IP Logged

                  The guy must have bought a quick pick or selected his own numbers THEN went to work and rigged the RNG to put out his numbers. Or he rigged the RNG machine to put out a specific combo for the upcoming draw THEN went out and bought that combo.

                  He must of somehow did something in the system because he never used a play slip. This story has gotten even more confusing.

                    Avatar
                    NY
                    United States
                    Member #23835
                    October 16, 2005
                    3471 Posts
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                    Posted: January 17, 2015, 4:43 pm - IP Logged

                    The attorney should be disbarred as well.  My guess was that the true winner had been murdered.

                    Did anyone on LP guess it was an inside job?

                    There was definitely speculation that it was a lottery employee who wasn't allowed to play. I don't specifically remember anyone thinking it was an inside job, but there are plenty of conspiracy theory types around here.

                    I was in the stolen ticket camp, and figured the delay was based on fear and the hope that time would reduce the chance that the original owner would recognize it as their ticket. I discounted the idea of a lottery employee because I figured it would have been easy enough to have somebody else claim the prize and there was no rational reason to wait until the last minute. I'm still  pretty sure that waiting until the last minute was the biggest mistake, because it immediately raises a big question about why to go along with all of the usual questions.

                    As for the attorneys, how do you plan to prove that they knowingly did anything wrong? I'm assuming that Tipton didn't call up and say "hey, I need help committing fraud to illegally claim a lottery prize I'm not entitled to". The first guy who contacted the lottery was supposedly told the real winner wanted to remain anonymous, and it's possible that the lawyers actually believed that was the real owner's intent. In the case of Shaw, he could easily have been hired to act on behalf of Tipton without meeting him or knowing who he was, and could have believed that he really was representing a trust formed by a legitimate claimant. As a lawyer he would not have been required to divulge anything, and IIRC that's just what happened when the lottery started their investigation. It's worth noting that if a client asks a lawyer "If I did such and such would it be illegal?" the lawyer is just going to answer the question. They may caution them against doing it, but they aren't going to ask if they did do it or if they plan to do it. The discussion will be privileged, so if the client gets arrested later the lawyer won't be talking about it, and honestly doesn't know if the client did or didn't do it.

                    It sounds like convicting Tipton is a slam dunk. The lawyers, are a different story.

                      Artist77's avatar - batman14

                      United States
                      Member #121745
                      January 16, 2012
                      4783 Posts
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                      Posted: January 17, 2015, 4:58 pm - IP Logged

                      There was definitely speculation that it was a lottery employee who wasn't allowed to play. I don't specifically remember anyone thinking it was an inside job, but there are plenty of conspiracy theory types around here.

                      I was in the stolen ticket camp, and figured the delay was based on fear and the hope that time would reduce the chance that the original owner would recognize it as their ticket. I discounted the idea of a lottery employee because I figured it would have been easy enough to have somebody else claim the prize and there was no rational reason to wait until the last minute. I'm still  pretty sure that waiting until the last minute was the biggest mistake, because it immediately raises a big question about why to go along with all of the usual questions.

                      As for the attorneys, how do you plan to prove that they knowingly did anything wrong? I'm assuming that Tipton didn't call up and say "hey, I need help committing fraud to illegally claim a lottery prize I'm not entitled to". The first guy who contacted the lottery was supposedly told the real winner wanted to remain anonymous, and it's possible that the lawyers actually believed that was the real owner's intent. In the case of Shaw, he could easily have been hired to act on behalf of Tipton without meeting him or knowing who he was, and could have believed that he really was representing a trust formed by a legitimate claimant. As a lawyer he would not have been required to divulge anything, and IIRC that's just what happened when the lottery started their investigation. It's worth noting that if a client asks a lawyer "If I did such and such would it be illegal?" the lawyer is just going to answer the question. They may caution them against doing it, but they aren't going to ask if they did do it or if they plan to do it. The discussion will be privileged, so if the client gets arrested later the lawyer won't be talking about it, and honestly doesn't know if the client did or didn't do it.

                      It sounds like convicting Tipton is a slam dunk. The lawyers, are a different story.

                      Well I am pretty familiar with the ethics codes for attorneys and one cannot act in furtherance of a crime and if you suspect your client in committing a crime, you have an obligation to resign from the case. I find it difficult to believe the attorneys, since their conversations would have been privileged, did not ask who was the actual ticket holder.  The lottery officials continued to press for questions to be answered and at that point, even a semi-intelligent person would have realized something was wrong.

                      And  yes, the rules of professional conduct DO require an attorney to resign from the case if that believe their client is about to commit a crime. Take at look at the MRPC sometime.

                      J'aime La France.

                        Avatar
                        Kentucky
                        United States
                        Member #32652
                        February 14, 2006
                        7295 Posts
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                        Posted: January 17, 2015, 7:00 pm - IP Logged

                        There was definitely speculation that it was a lottery employee who wasn't allowed to play. I don't specifically remember anyone thinking it was an inside job, but there are plenty of conspiracy theory types around here.

                        I was in the stolen ticket camp, and figured the delay was based on fear and the hope that time would reduce the chance that the original owner would recognize it as their ticket. I discounted the idea of a lottery employee because I figured it would have been easy enough to have somebody else claim the prize and there was no rational reason to wait until the last minute. I'm still  pretty sure that waiting until the last minute was the biggest mistake, because it immediately raises a big question about why to go along with all of the usual questions.

                        As for the attorneys, how do you plan to prove that they knowingly did anything wrong? I'm assuming that Tipton didn't call up and say "hey, I need help committing fraud to illegally claim a lottery prize I'm not entitled to". The first guy who contacted the lottery was supposedly told the real winner wanted to remain anonymous, and it's possible that the lawyers actually believed that was the real owner's intent. In the case of Shaw, he could easily have been hired to act on behalf of Tipton without meeting him or knowing who he was, and could have believed that he really was representing a trust formed by a legitimate claimant. As a lawyer he would not have been required to divulge anything, and IIRC that's just what happened when the lottery started their investigation. It's worth noting that if a client asks a lawyer "If I did such and such would it be illegal?" the lawyer is just going to answer the question. They may caution them against doing it, but they aren't going to ask if they did do it or if they plan to do it. The discussion will be privileged, so if the client gets arrested later the lawyer won't be talking about it, and honestly doesn't know if the client did or didn't do it.

                        It sounds like convicting Tipton is a slam dunk. The lawyers, are a different story.

                        If Crawford Shaw read some LP member's opinion, he probably assumed it was someone just trying to collect anonymously.

                        He allegedly used friends in Texas, one of which was a lawyer, to contact a Canadian man about claiming the prize because the winner wanted to remain anonymous.

                        We know Shaw was involved because he tried to validate the ticket on behalf of Hexam Investments Ltd., but proving he was helping Tipton commit two counts of fraud will be almost impossible. There is the question if a Texas lawyer knew exactly what Tipton was doing, but it doesn't appear they have proof. Attorney-client privilege does not apply when used to commit fraud.

                        Punishment for Class D felonies.

                          maringoman's avatar - images q=tbn:ANd9GcTbRxpKQmOfcCoUqF2FyqIOAwDo7rg9G-lfJLAALPGWJWwiz19eRw
                          Massachusetts
                          United States
                          Member #37433
                          April 14, 2006
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                          Posted: January 18, 2015, 7:19 am - IP Logged

                          He must of somehow did something in the system because he never used a play slip. This story has gotten even more confusing.

                          Yes. He was the Director of Information Security in a game that uses those godawful RNG's. The truth shall come out

                          That money's gone fo ever

                            TheOtherOne's avatar - Lottery-027.jpg
                            Nashville, TN
                            United States
                            Member #86739
                            February 9, 2010
                            483 Posts
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                            Posted: February 1, 2015, 10:34 am - IP Logged

                            He must of somehow did something in the system because he never used a play slip. This story has gotten even more confusing.

                            Where does it state he didn't ude a play slip?

                            did he just call out the numbers to a clerk or punch them in himself? 

                            It says he bought the ticket at a mart so either he jumped behind a counter or had the clerk do it. 

                            Seems to me if him and the lawyer had hired a better Canadian and covered every single minute detail then they would've got away with it. Fools!

                              RedStang's avatar - tallman zps6gf4inoc.jpg
                              NY
                              United States
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                              January 21, 2012
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                              Posted: February 1, 2015, 10:46 am - IP Logged

                              Where does it state he didn't ude a play slip?

                              did he just call out the numbers to a clerk or punch them in himself? 

                              It says he bought the ticket at a mart so either he jumped behind a counter or had the clerk do it. 

                              Seems to me if him and the lawyer had hired a better Canadian and covered every single minute detail then they would've got away with it. Fools!

                              You're right, i didn't notice the play slip before so he definitely set it up.