Welcome Guest
Log In | Register )
You last visited December 3, 2016, 12:35 pm
All times shown are
Eastern Time (GMT-5:00)

Texas legislature to consider lottery winner anonymity bill

Topic closed. 27 replies. Last post 2 years ago by rcbbuckeye.

Page 2 of 2
4.84
PrintE-mailLink
Bondi Junction
Australia
Member #57242
December 24, 2007
1102 Posts
Offline
Posted: May 9, 2015, 9:15 pm - IP Logged

"Don't mess with Texas".      Winners of more then $1 million to remain anonymous is highly welcome almost everywhere. A winner has so much swirling around their life this helps them remain sane and safe.

  We should follow the example of the States that have laws protecting winners with anonymity i.e. Kansas, Maryland,Delaware,  Ohio .  And one other State I think.

Texas should adopt the British Lottery policy. Winners have the right to anonymity, but they also get financial advice. When people win big, some may not be able to manage it and could do with independent  professional  financial advice.

 

 

 

 

As one of the world’s leading lottery operators, Camelot sets global standards when it comes to looking after winners. It offers an unparalleled level of professional support to help and advise new winners throughout this life-changing experience, as well as a unique aftercare service.

As well as being a time of extreme excitement and happiness, suddenly winning a substantial sum of money can be an overwhelming and emotional experience for many people – but support from Camelot begins as soon as a winner makes a claim on a prize.

For UK National Lottery prizes over £50,000, our player services team is able to pay them in the comfort of their own home, or alternatively they can choose to have their prize validated at one of our prize payout centres.

For winners over £500,000, a private banking representative can visit them at home to discuss additional services on offer to winners with new-found wealth. We also arrange for a panel of independent legal and financial experts to visit winners of over £500,000 to offer impartial advice and practical guidelines.

One of the most important decisions for new winners to make is whether to opt to go public or remain anonymous. If a winner decides to talk publicly about their win, Camelot’s PR team will organise a press conference and handle all media interest on their behalf, removing the anxiety that can accompany talking about a big win.

If they have requested to remain anonymous, Camelot takes its obligations and duty of care to protect winners’ privacy very seriously. Unless a winner agrees to take full publicity and signs an agreement to that effect, no information about them can be released by Camelot into the public domain.

We have a dedicated team of winners’ advisers who look after all our major jackpot winners. They remain a source of support and advice for as long as a winner needs – often remaining in touch years after hitting the jackpot.

We all get a lot out of lotteries!

    Avatar

    United States
    Member #122691
    February 6, 2012
    330 Posts
    Offline
    Posted: May 9, 2015, 11:27 pm - IP Logged

    I am abivalent about this, on one hand I understand the desire for anonymity, but on the other hand there are legitimate circumstances where hiding the winner's identity could lead to someone getting away with fraud. Someone could have stolen a ticket, cheated a partner etc etc out of their rightful winnings and that's not right. What if someone had hit you years ago in a DUI accident and paralyzed you and destroyed your life and now a few years later they won $50 million, should you not be compensated? Most people want anonymity because they assume they will be on the winning side, almost no one ever considers that they might be on the side of the guy getting screwed over. 

      Bondi Junction
      Australia
      Member #57242
      December 24, 2007
      1102 Posts
      Offline
      Posted: May 10, 2015, 2:37 am - IP Logged

      If you win the lottery and want to keep it a secret, you've got to trust.

      In other words, let someone else face the publicity.

       

      We'll probably never know who bought the $24 million Lotto Texas jackpot ticket July 28 at a southwest Houston Kroger store because the winner claimed the prize through the MDDSS Revocable Trust.

       

      Manfred Sternberg, a trustee for the Houston-based trust, represented the winner Wednesday at the ceremonial check presentation.

       

      Under Texas law, a lottery winner cannot remain anonymous, but the winner doesn't have to be an individual. It can be a trust, Texas Lottery Commission spokeswoman Kelly Cripe said.

       

      Information was not immediately available on how common it is for winners to form trusts before claiming their prizes, Cripe said.

       

      Another Houston lotto winner used the same tactic in May 2010 when he collected his lump-sum payout of $48.8 million through the MAED Trust after a delay caused by a photocopier snafu that blackened the front of the ticket.

       

      The man, who has yet to go public, purchased a winning ticket worth $76 million the previous October at the H-E-B Pantry in Alvin.

       

      The MDDSS Revocable Trust also selected the immediate payout option rather than 25 annual payments, making the prize worth about $18.9 million before taxes, according to the commission.

       

      Remaining anonymous can be a smart move for people who suddenly become very rich, a financial expert said.

       

      Susan Bradley, a Florida certified financial planner who started the Sudden Money Institute, said it's a good thing Texas allows winners to keep quiet about striking it rich.

       

      "Some states require a photo op," Bradley said Friday from her Florida office. "It's hard enough to adapt to having this kind of money - the responsibilities, the choices. It's very stressful. If there's less publicity, it makes it a little easier."

      We all get a lot out of lotteries!

        dallascowboyfan's avatar - tiana the-princess-and-the-frog.jpg
        Oklahoma
        United States
        Member #82391
        November 12, 2009
        6290 Posts
        Offline
        Posted: May 10, 2015, 8:15 am - IP Logged

        Thumbs Up WTG Texas!!!!!

        I Love Pink & Green 1908

          CDanaT's avatar - tiger avatar_04_hd_pictures_169016.jpg
          TX
          United States
          Member #121193
          January 4, 2012
          1637 Posts
          Offline
          Posted: May 10, 2015, 8:48 am - IP Logged

          I am abivalent about this, on one hand I understand the desire for anonymity, but on the other hand there are legitimate circumstances where hiding the winner's identity could lead to someone getting away with fraud. Someone could have stolen a ticket, cheated a partner etc etc out of their rightful winnings and that's not right. What if someone had hit you years ago in a DUI accident and paralyzed you and destroyed your life and now a few years later they won $50 million, should you not be compensated? Most people want anonymity because they assume they will be on the winning side, almost no one ever considers that they might be on the side of the guy getting screwed over. 

          Venom, while you point out concerns of something that might happen. That's where you would normally get an atty. and have them do the due diligence anyway. Fraud and the DUI and theft are all crimes that are public and can be prosecuted. The prosecutor does not reveal anyone's financial status to the victim unless it is part of the discovery to be used in that case. As far as a DUI and the paralysis, Civil tort claims have a 2 year statute of limitations to them and almost all crimes have a statute of limitations. IF you were a victim of the above mentioned concerns you would never hear if the offender inherited money from a rich relative of from an insurance policy.
          Setting rules in place for the possibilities of the above mentioned issues is not the lottery commission's authority. Collecting the money and issuing out funds for being a participant with a winning ticket is. Having anonymity is reasonable request for anyone that takes the time to purchase a ticket legally. What they have done before or after that transaction is nobodies business unless it is part of public record  as you described above.
          I don't know about you but I like my personal business being personal. What I have accumulated in the past or in the future should not be subject to someone having the right to know as a part of general public knowledge or under the guise of "you might be an unethical or immoral person". Just my 2 cents

          Stay Positive, Believe and good things will come your way

            Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

            United States
            Member #142499
            May 13, 2013
            1182 Posts
            Offline
            Posted: May 10, 2015, 9:15 am - IP Logged

            Venom, while you point out concerns of something that might happen. That's where you would normally get an atty. and have them do the due diligence anyway. Fraud and the DUI and theft are all crimes that are public and can be prosecuted. The prosecutor does not reveal anyone's financial status to the victim unless it is part of the discovery to be used in that case. As far as a DUI and the paralysis, Civil tort claims have a 2 year statute of limitations to them and almost all crimes have a statute of limitations. IF you were a victim of the above mentioned concerns you would never hear if the offender inherited money from a rich relative of from an insurance policy.
            Setting rules in place for the possibilities of the above mentioned issues is not the lottery commission's authority. Collecting the money and issuing out funds for being a participant with a winning ticket is. Having anonymity is reasonable request for anyone that takes the time to purchase a ticket legally. What they have done before or after that transaction is nobodies business unless it is part of public record  as you described above.
            I don't know about you but I like my personal business being personal. What I have accumulated in the past or in the future should not be subject to someone having the right to know as a part of general public knowledge or under the guise of "you might be an unethical or immoral person". Just my 2 cents

            CDanaT, excellent response. I was going to reply on pretty much the same points, so I'm really glad someone else gets how false both the fraud argument and lawsuit rights are. 

            People seem to be under the misconception that just because winners aren't pimped out to the media that the lottery will stop doing due diligence when it comes to combating stolen tickets and other cases of fraud. 

            As for the lawsuit scenario, it doesn't hold water. If someone injures you, you're given a judgement based on your pain, suffering, lost wages, medical expenses etc. If the person cannot pay, then liens can be placed on their property and future earnings until the awarded amount is paid in full. So it's not as if you're going to get screwed over just because that person wins the lottery in some distant future. 

              rcbbuckeye's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
              Texas
              United States
              Member #55889
              October 23, 2007
              5588 Posts
              Offline
              Posted: May 10, 2015, 9:29 am - IP Logged

              Venom, while you point out concerns of something that might happen. That's where you would normally get an atty. and have them do the due diligence anyway. Fraud and the DUI and theft are all crimes that are public and can be prosecuted. The prosecutor does not reveal anyone's financial status to the victim unless it is part of the discovery to be used in that case. As far as a DUI and the paralysis, Civil tort claims have a 2 year statute of limitations to them and almost all crimes have a statute of limitations. IF you were a victim of the above mentioned concerns you would never hear if the offender inherited money from a rich relative of from an insurance policy.
              Setting rules in place for the possibilities of the above mentioned issues is not the lottery commission's authority. Collecting the money and issuing out funds for being a participant with a winning ticket is. Having anonymity is reasonable request for anyone that takes the time to purchase a ticket legally. What they have done before or after that transaction is nobodies business unless it is part of public record  as you described above.
              I don't know about you but I like my personal business being personal. What I have accumulated in the past or in the future should not be subject to someone having the right to know as a part of general public knowledge or under the guise of "you might be an unethical or immoral person". Just my 2 cents

              CDanaT,

              Thanks for shedding light on this.

              And yes, the lottery commission is still going to do due diligence on any winning jackpot ticket to be sure the real winner is holding the ticket.

              CAN'T WIN IF YOU'RE NOT IN

              A DOLLAR AND A DREAM (OR $2)

                wizeguy's avatar - animaniacs04

                United States
                Member #15143
                May 10, 2005
                414 Posts
                Offline
                Posted: May 10, 2015, 11:15 am - IP Logged

                I agree with mypiemaster that there should be no dollar threshold. Anonymity should be available to all winners. If they insist on the million dollar threshold I'd rather they reword it to 'winners of one million or more' rather than 'more than a million'.

                  Avatar

                  United States
                  Member #122691
                  February 6, 2012
                  330 Posts
                  Offline
                  Posted: May 10, 2015, 1:26 pm - IP Logged

                  Venom, while you point out concerns of something that might happen. That's where you would normally get an atty. and have them do the due diligence anyway. Fraud and the DUI and theft are all crimes that are public and can be prosecuted. The prosecutor does not reveal anyone's financial status to the victim unless it is part of the discovery to be used in that case. As far as a DUI and the paralysis, Civil tort claims have a 2 year statute of limitations to them and almost all crimes have a statute of limitations. IF you were a victim of the above mentioned concerns you would never hear if the offender inherited money from a rich relative of from an insurance policy.
                  Setting rules in place for the possibilities of the above mentioned issues is not the lottery commission's authority. Collecting the money and issuing out funds for being a participant with a winning ticket is. Having anonymity is reasonable request for anyone that takes the time to purchase a ticket legally. What they have done before or after that transaction is nobodies business unless it is part of public record  as you described above.
                  I don't know about you but I like my personal business being personal. What I have accumulated in the past or in the future should not be subject to someone having the right to know as a part of general public knowledge or under the guise of "you might be an unethical or immoral person". Just my 2 cents

                  Do you know for an actual fact how deep the lottery actually goes to find out if fraud was committed, if someone has judgments etc etc, in other states, counties and whatnot? If someone was allowed to claim their prize under the guise of a trust wouldn't that also allow them to circumvent any judgments and so on? You forget one of the essential elements for getting caught committing fraud is that the person it is happening to would need to know. If you were able to stay anonymous then it's pretty <snip> hard for the person you screwed over to make a claim of fraud if they did not know you won. How many times have you seen a situation where a boyfriend and girlfriend played the lottery together and then one of them decides they are going to try to screw the other one out of their share of the winnings, or even a quasi lottery pool? Many times, that's what. 

                  Pretty sure civil tort claims in my state have a 7 year statute of limitations also, two years seems really low. Also when someone dies the estate goes through probate and it is published so not quite sure about your claims that if someone dies I would not hear about the other person inheriting money or assets. 

                  This post has been automatically changed by the Lottery Post computer system to remove inappropriate content and/or spam.

                    Teddi's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                    United States
                    Member #142499
                    May 13, 2013
                    1182 Posts
                    Offline
                    Posted: May 10, 2015, 10:43 pm - IP Logged

                    Do you know for an actual fact how deep the lottery actually goes to find out if fraud was committed, if someone has judgments etc etc, in other states, counties and whatnot? If someone was allowed to claim their prize under the guise of a trust wouldn't that also allow them to circumvent any judgments and so on? You forget one of the essential elements for getting caught committing fraud is that the person it is happening to would need to know. If you were able to stay anonymous then it's pretty <snip> hard for the person you screwed over to make a claim of fraud if they did not know you won. How many times have you seen a situation where a boyfriend and girlfriend played the lottery together and then one of them decides they are going to try to screw the other one out of their share of the winnings, or even a quasi lottery pool? Many times, that's what. 

                    Pretty sure civil tort claims in my state have a 7 year statute of limitations also, two years seems really low. Also when someone dies the estate goes through probate and it is published so not quite sure about your claims that if someone dies I would not hear about the other person inheriting money or assets. 

                    This post has been automatically changed by the Lottery Post computer system to remove inappropriate content and/or spam.

                    Seems to me that the fear-mongering stance of guaranteed fraud is moot unless someone can prove to me that 

                    1. The lottery commission does not investigate winners in the 6 states that allow for anonymity, and/or
                    2. There is a higher prevalence of fraud in those 6 states than in the states that require publicity
                    3. Most importantly, publicizing the winners is more effective at fraud prevention than the lotteries checks and balances. Because every fraud case I've seen was thwarted either by the commission's due diligence or by friends/coworkers/spouse noticing increased spending by the fraudster and not because their photo was plastered on the news. 

                    Unless someone can prove those 3 points, then the fraud argument is nothing but conjecture and therefore moot. What isn't conjecture is that every single lottery winner whose name has been publicized has suffered from some form of harassment. Many have been forced to move whether they wanted to or not. Many others have been threatened with lawsuits or subjected to the not-so-subtle threats of bodily injury to themselves or family. As such, it should be a right to say yay or nay to having the entire world be privy to one's new net worth.

                      Think's avatar - lightbulb
                      Marquette, MI
                      United States
                      Member #20541
                      August 20, 2005
                      705 Posts
                      Offline
                      Posted: May 12, 2015, 8:57 pm - IP Logged

                      To recklessly endanger the player by requiring them to release their name should be illegal.

                      Sooner or later the terrorists will start kidnaping winners for ransom and homeland security will probably tell the relatives not to pay it.

                      Anonymity should be required.

                      If the player wants to broadcast their win all over and be a big shot then that would be the players problem.

                        haymaker's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
                        Egg Harbor twp.south Jersey shore
                        United States
                        Member #112968
                        June 29, 2011
                        3854 Posts
                        Offline
                        Posted: May 12, 2015, 9:43 pm - IP Logged

                        Good for TX. not much chance of Jersey doing this, so I'll just keep on going over the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

                        I doubt Jersey cares about the loss of the ticket sale to me cause they will still get the 10.8 % tax

                        and they get part of the toll when I use the DMB.

                        Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds    -- Charles Mackay  LL.D.

                          rcbbuckeye's avatar - Lottery-043.jpg
                          Texas
                          United States
                          Member #55889
                          October 23, 2007
                          5588 Posts
                          Offline
                          Posted: May 14, 2015, 8:46 pm - IP Logged

                          I was just reading on another website (which will go nameless, from me anyway) that it is against this bill because of the chance that the TLC could claim there is a jackpot winner when there really isn't, and just take the money, (this would only work for a Texas lottery game, not MM or PB).

                          On one hand this is something I haven't thought of, but.......I really don't think a state lottery commission would actually steal a jackpot or commit fraud. If they did such a thing and got caught, it would immediately and forever end the lottery. To me, that risk just doesn't make sense.

                          At any rate, I'm rather ambivalent about anonymity, because with sensible precautions a jackpot winner can head off unwanted trouble/beggars.

                          CAN'T WIN IF YOU'RE NOT IN

                          A DOLLAR AND A DREAM (OR $2)