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Mississippi panel studying other state lotteries

Sep 6, 2017, 8:10 am

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Mississippi LotteryMississippi Lottery: Mississippi panel studying other state lotteriesRating:

JACKSON, Miss. — A special House panel has been looking at other states' experience with lotteries as it works on a study requested by House Speaker Philip Gunn, who opposes a lottery for Mississippi but says he wants the issue thoroughly vetted.

Members of the House Lottery Study Working Group — comprised of lawmakers, state gaming and other officials — held their second of three meetings at the Capitol on Tuesday. The first meeting in May was described as "lottery 101," on the history of, laws and facts about lotteries. The final meeting is expected sometime in October, and the group hopes to have a final report to the House in November.

The intent of the report, according to Rep. Richard Bennett, R-Long Beach, chairman of the study committee, is not to make a recommendation on whether Mississippi should adopt a lottery, but just to provide information to legislators.

Tuesday's meeting focused on lotteries from the neighboring states of Arkansas and Louisiana; as well as Texas, which operates the largest lottery; Wyoming, the state with the newest lottery; and Nebraska, an example of a well-run lottery, according to state officials.

The five states studied by the special lottery committee all use a portion of their lottery earnings to fund education.

But, according to Bennett, "A lot of them feel it is just a shell game. If (state earnings from a lottery) goes to education, that just means less money from the general fund" going to education. But Bennett added, "A lot of people feel it makes for a better sale if some of it goes to education."

Mississippi is one of six states without a lottery. Many people contend that the state is losing a significant amount of money because of Mississippians traveling to neighboring states — Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana — to purchase lottery tickets.

During the past two years, there has been growing momentum for Mississippi to enact a lottery. Gov. Phil Bryant, who once opposed the lottery, has "evolved" on the issue and has voiced support for a lottery — perhaps to help pay for transportation needs.

In the 2016 session, the House approved amendments on bills on two separate occasions to enact a lottery. Those proposals died later in the process.

Committee members learned that lottery officials in both Arkansas and Louisiana said stores near Mississippi are their busiest. And that the scratch games, not the national lotto games, are their most profitable.

"(Arkansas lottery officials) will not be happy for us to have" a lottery, Bennett said.

Some of the states studied by the Mississippi panel required a certain percentage of the lottery revenue to be returned to the state. Others did not.

The states that did not mandate a certain percentage of revenue to be returned to the state maintained in the long-run they could generate more money for the state because they had the ability to spend more on advertising.

Some of the states did studies on the possible socioeconomic consequences of a lottery, such as more bankruptcies, caused by people spending too much on purchasing lottery tickets. The studies said they found no such negative impact and, at least one state, Wyoming, said the lottery did not negatively impact its casino gambling industry.

Multiple states maintain that those playing the lottery games are better educated and more affluent than the population as a whole.

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11 comments. Last comment 3 years ago by music*.
Page 1 of 1
haymaker's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
Egg Harbor twp.south Jersey shore
United States
Member #112964
June 29, 2011
4135 Posts
Offline

"Nebraska an example of a well run lottery"

Oh yeah... have a look at LP's state report card...it rates a "D"

Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds    -- Charles Mackay  LL.D.

    music*'s avatar - DiscoBallGlowing
    USN United States Navy
    Fresno, California
    United States
    Member #157851
    August 2, 2014
    3959 Posts
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    I would love to read a study on how many winners go bankrupt.  70% is the most commonly used figure. 

     Then the study could go in detail showing the jackpot winners and how many lost it all. Power Ball and Mega Millions winners.

    The California Lottery gives all of its profits to education. Minus winnings, administration.

     "Multiple states maintain that those playing the lottery games are better educated and more affluent than the population as a whole." This makes sense because the poor cannot create these billion dollar jackpots. 

    US Flag

     "We are all in this together!" 

      Avatar
      Simpsonville
      United States
      Member #163184
      January 22, 2015
      2289 Posts
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      I would love to read a study on how many winners go bankrupt.  70% is the most commonly used figure. 

       Then the study could go in detail showing the jackpot winners and how many lost it all. Power Ball and Mega Millions winners.

      The California Lottery gives all of its profits to education. Minus winnings, administration.

       "Multiple states maintain that those playing the lottery games are better educated and more affluent than the population as a whole." This makes sense because the poor cannot create these billion dollar jackpots. 

      US Flag

      music* I am still astonished that Mississippi even has casinos for that Bible thumping state. 

       

      Still have no 'faith' that they'll ever get a lottery. 

      With the exception of Las Vegas I don't/won't visit casinos in non-lottery states and have not gone on junket flights to MS, though told it is close to Memphis for lottery.

        grwurston's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg
        Win Today.
        bel air maryland
        United States
        Member #90247
        April 24, 2010
        9575 Posts
        Offline

        If the Mississippi legislators are using the lotteries of Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, and Wyoming as examples for the way to do lottery business, then the current and future players are screwed.

        Other than Texas, none of the other states use ball drawings except on the jackpot games. Mega Millions, Power Ball, Lucky for Life. The daily games, Pick 3, Pick 4 etc, are all computer drawn.

        Wyoming doesn't even have daily games. They have Jackpot games only.

        To see how your state rates, click on Results in the blue bar. Then scroll down to State Lottery Report Card.

        "You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi Berra, Hall of Fame baseball player.

        The numbers will tell you what numbers to play. Pay attention to the numbers.

          Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
          100
          Zeta Reticuli Star System
          United States
          Member #30469
          January 17, 2006
          11504 Posts
          Offline

          I would love to read a study on how many winners go bankrupt.  70% is the most commonly used figure. 

           Then the study could go in detail showing the jackpot winners and how many lost it all. Power Ball and Mega Millions winners.

          The California Lottery gives all of its profits to education. Minus winnings, administration.

           "Multiple states maintain that those playing the lottery games are better educated and more affluent than the population as a whole." This makes sense because the poor cannot create these billion dollar jackpots. 

          US Flag

          music*,

          This is from one study of lottery money going towards education;

          It's exactly the opposite of what you thought was going to occur. We're getting new revenue, it's going toward education, and then you end up spending less on education after this period of time," said Pierce.

          Pierce says at first, education spending gets a significant bump. But after that first year, the rate of increase on education spending actually tends to slows down. After about 7 or 8 years, less money is spent on education than would have been spent if the state 

          (Michigan)

          http://www.wndu.com/home/headlines/103966479.html

          Other studies have shown that in some states lottery money goes into education but an equal or greater amount is pulled out of education somewhere else within it.

          //////////////////////////////////////////////

          Re: Miss. looking at a lottery, it sounds like they don't have the players in mind at as haymaker and gwurston implied.

          Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any. So many systems, so many theories, so few jackpot winners. 

          Lep

          There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

            Avatar
            Simpsonville
            United States
            Member #163184
            January 22, 2015
            2289 Posts
            Offline

            Was just wondering if they traveled to those states in the study on the taxpayer's tab?  It didn't specify, just mentioned a study.

              music*'s avatar - DiscoBallGlowing
              USN United States Navy
              Fresno, California
              United States
              Member #157851
              August 2, 2014
              3959 Posts
              Offline

              music*,

              This is from one study of lottery money going towards education;

              It's exactly the opposite of what you thought was going to occur. We're getting new revenue, it's going toward education, and then you end up spending less on education after this period of time," said Pierce.

              Pierce says at first, education spending gets a significant bump. But after that first year, the rate of increase on education spending actually tends to slows down. After about 7 or 8 years, less money is spent on education than would have been spent if the state 

              (Michigan)

              http://www.wndu.com/home/headlines/103966479.html

              Other studies have shown that in some states lottery money goes into education but an equal or greater amount is pulled out of education somewhere else within it.

              //////////////////////////////////////////////

              Re: Miss. looking at a lottery, it sounds like they don't have the players in mind at as haymaker and gwurston implied.

              I Agree! Coin Toss.  Thank You for this study by Professor Pierce. A lottery expert.

               California may be an exception to the rule. The California Lottery posts how much goes to schools each year. How much each school gets.  By law, the lottery only has one beneficiary and that is Education. 

               Dance

               "We are all in this together!" 

                Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                100
                Zeta Reticuli Star System
                United States
                Member #30469
                January 17, 2006
                11504 Posts
                Offline

                music*,

                Consider;

                For example, in Illinois, where the state spends $6.5 billion a year on education, only $619 million, or one-tenth, comes from the lottery. In California, with an $84 billion education budget, the lottery funds only about $1.2 billion, or one-seventieth. In Florida, lottery proceeds cover one-twentieth of state education spending. In New Jersey, it's one-thirtieth; in Texas, one-fiftieth.

                "We thought that it would be a windfall" says Michael Johnson, executive director of the Illinois Association of School Boards. He says the idea that lottery money adds to education funding is a myth. 
                "The general public -- they were fooled by this," he says. "The belief that that's additional money, above and beyond what we would normally get, that's the part that's not true."

                "Well, it's certainly one of the worst votes I ever made," says former Illinois State Senator Dawn Netsch.

                Netsch, whose vote helped pass the Illinois lottery in the 1970s, says lottery money simply replaces tax dollars legislators might spend on education, but instead spend on other projects.

                "The lottery becomes part of the big pot of money that funds the basic functions of state government," Netsch said.

                In Florida, where lottery proceeds are a billion dollars a year, spending per pupil…has dropped nine spots from 37th to 46th in the nation since voters approved a lottery 20 years ago.

                n fact, our investigation of government spending in the 24 states that dedicate lottery funds for education yields a stunningly bad report card. The percentage of state spending on education is down or flat in 21 of those states from coast to coast.

                Down, for example, in the following states: Washington (-6 percent), New York (-5 percent), Missouri (-4 percent). It's down 3 percent in FloridaIllinoisOhio, and Michigan and Oregon. Texas is down by one percent.

                It's up in only three states -- New Hampshire (+4 percent), Georgia (+ 4 percent) and Tennessee (+2 percent).

                More;

                https://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-lottery-shortchanging-schools/

                Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any. So many systems, so many theories, so few jackpot winners. 

                Lep

                There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                  music*'s avatar - DiscoBallGlowing
                  USN United States Navy
                  Fresno, California
                  United States
                  Member #157851
                  August 2, 2014
                  3959 Posts
                  Offline

                  Coin Toss, You are showing all of us here at LP what a Gold Member, Top 100 Poster, a member since Jan. 17, 2006 with 10,524 posts can do. 

                   You are dedicated to bringing the truth to the discussion. We should all be proud to know you and your work.

                   Thank You !!!

                  US Flag

                   "We are all in this together!" 

                    Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
                    100
                    Zeta Reticuli Star System
                    United States
                    Member #30469
                    January 17, 2006
                    11504 Posts
                    Offline

                    music*,

                    Facts mean so much more than urban legends some lotteries promote.

                    Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any. So many systems, so many theories, so few jackpot winners. 

                    Lep

                    There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

                      music*'s avatar - DiscoBallGlowing
                      USN United States Navy
                      Fresno, California
                      United States
                      Member #157851
                      August 2, 2014
                      3959 Posts
                      Offline

                      music*,

                      Facts mean so much more than urban legends some lotteries promote.

                       As Sargent Joe Friday of Dragnet would say, "Just the facts, Mam".

                      Cool

                       "We are all in this together!"