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Aunt threatens to sue nephew over lottery jackpot

Jul 14, 2018, 9:17 am

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Includes video report

A woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.

Barb Reddick and her nephew, Tyrone MacInnis, each received checks for $611,319.50 on Thursday after a $1,222,639 ticket with both their names on it was pulled Wednesday night at a Chase the Ace draw in Margaree, N.S.

Reddick surprised the organizers by telling the media soon afterward that she would be "taking (MacInnis) to court."

On Friday, Reddick explained that, although MacInnis purchased the ticket, she sent him $100 for tickets, and "told him to put his name on it for good luck." She says she only planned to give him $150,000 if he won.

"He bought other tickets and didn't put my name on it," she said.

"I'm not greedy," she went on. "If he would have won, I wouldn't have (gotten) nothing out of him," Reddick added.

Reddick said she will never speak with her nephew again "in this life or the next," adding, "He's dead to me. I don't want nothing to do with him."

Reddick maintained Friday that she would be "taking him to court" and said that she had called a lawyer but had not yet heard back. She said pursing legal action is "for the principle."

"It don't matter if the judge give me the money back or not," she said.

A member of MacInnis' family said that they would not comment, saying only that they plan to get a lawyer.

Bernice Curley, chair of the Margaree Forks Chase the Ace committee, said she was floored.

She said because there were two names on the winning ticket, she wrote a check for half of the winnings to each person, after checking with province's alcohol and gaming division "to make sure I was allowed to do that. They were perfectly fine with that, that it would make it easier for everyone involved. So I split the check evenly."

"I can't really explain it. I didn't expect anything like that to happen," she said. "I just came to deliver the checks and present them to the winners.

"I'm a little bit disappointed that happened at the end."

Earlier Thursday morning, Curley said that there was a good crowd on hand for the big win.

"The buzz was quite high," she said. 

"Everyone was pretty excited to see what was going to happen. Since the jackpot got higher, every week the crowd got bigger."

"I think people in the area got a little frustrated. They're not used to having traffic gridlocked in Margaree Forks, but it was short-lived and it was great to see so many people come to the area."

The proceeds are being shared by the Margaree Volunteer Fire Department and North East Margaree Volunteer Fire Department, which are getting new fire trucks and possibly emergency response vehicles.

"For a place that says there's no money, there was money coming into Margaree over the last few weeks. I'm not sure where, but everyone just wants a shot at it [the jackpot]," Curley said.

She said she's been asked if she feels guilty about the money people are spending on tickets.

"I'm not sure. I'm really not sure where that money comes from," Curley said.

"I'm more of a believer that if you weren't giving it to us, you'd be giving it to some other gambling idea."

Does Reddick have a case?

Rob Currie, who teaches at the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, said the first thing that needs to be done is find out what rules and regulations are in place for this type of situation.

This would require looking at the rules from the Alcohol, Gaming, Fuel and Tobacco Division of Service Nova Scotia, which handle games of chance such as Chase the Ace.

He said there would also have to be evidence about what the terms of the agreement were; noting that an oral contract is "much dicier" than a written one.

He added that, because this dispute is about more than $25,000, it is too large to be brought to small claims court and it could only be brought to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

"It could cost tens of thousands of dollars to both sides and it could drag on for years," said Currie.

He said there are many disputes known to Canadian law about lottery tickets, and his impression is that none of them end very well.

Halifax-based lawer David Hutt, who was not representing Reddick when he spoke to local media on Friday, said that she "may" have a case, although he's waiting for more details.

"It's a question of contract," Hutt said. "It's not really between her and the organizers of the event. It's actually between her and her nephew, and right now we're really scant on analysis."

Hutt said that MacInnis' name being on the ticket would be evidence the court would consider, but how that's interpreted "depends on what the two discussed." He said it's also likely the court would consider whether there was an "oral, informal" contract between the two.

"If it was just a gratuitous promise on her part, it's quite possible that she does have a case and (if) there is no contract, she should get the whole amount," Hutt said.

Hutt emphasized that "we're really scant on details" and pointed out that he has yet to hear MacInnis' version of events. MacInnis has not yet commented publicly.

"It's terribly sad and it suggests to me that more of us should formalize these agreements," Hutt said.

Hutt suggested that Canadians who play the lottery together — including in office pools — should write down their contracts. The Atlantic Lottery Corporation provides a form that players can use to document their pool play.

About Chase the Ace

Chase the Ace is a form of lottery that has gained popularity since 2013 in parts of Canada as a way to raise funds for charities. It is also known as Crown the King and Jig the Joker.

The jackpot accumulates from week-to-week until it is won, and the game is then over. Each week participants buy lottery tickets. The funds from ticket sales are divided into three parts. Typically the organizers keep 50%, the winner of the lottery takes 20% and 30% goes into the jackpot. The lottery winner also then draws a card from a deck of playing cards and wins the accumulated jackpot if the ace of spades is drawn. If not, the reduced deck is kept for the following week's game.

VIDEO: Watch the aftermath of the jackpot award ceremony

42JzlGzGNDEAunt threatens to sue nephew over lottery jackpotA woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.PT01M21Shttps://img.youtube.com/vi/42JzlGzGNDE/hqdefault.jpghttps://youtu.be/42JzlGzGNDE2018-07-14T09:09:00-05:00

News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

Thanks to dannyct for the tip.

Lottery Post Staff

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73 comments. Last comment 2 years ago by LottoBux.
Page 1 of 5
wander73's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

United States
Member #153769
March 24, 2014
4721 Posts
Offline

That sucks big time.   They're paying more for the lawyer than the ticket is actually worth.  This is a trust issue too.  If it goes to court, it will drag.   Good luck to that woman, however,  they should have had a plan before all this happened.  Since names are on the ticket, he might have to pay her depending on the winnings.

I love pecans and making sales with commissions.   

My amazon store is just like the lottery.

    CDanaT's avatar - Nolz june15.jpg
    Central TN
    United States
    Member #121189
    January 4, 2012
    4740 Posts
    Offline

    Didn't even have to scroll to the bottom......................  Just pathetic

    Integrity: There is just no substitute.

      Avatar
      Northern Beaches
      Australia
      Member #187037
      January 9, 2018
      124 Posts
      Offline

      Includes video report

      A woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.

      Barb Reddick and her nephew, Tyrone MacInnis, each received checks for $611,319.50 on Thursday after a $1,222,639 ticket with both their names on it was pulled Wednesday night at a Chase the Ace draw in Margaree, N.S.

      Reddick surprised the organizers by telling the media soon afterward that she would be "taking (MacInnis) to court."

      On Friday, Reddick explained that, although MacInnis purchased the ticket, she sent him $100 for tickets, and "told him to put his name on it for good luck." She says she only planned to give him $150,000 if he won.

      "He bought other tickets and didn't put my name on it," she said.

      "I'm not greedy," she went on. "If he would have won, I wouldn't have (gotten) nothing out of him," Reddick added.

      Reddick said she will never speak with her nephew again "in this life or the next," adding, "He's dead to me. I don't want nothing to do with him."

      Reddick maintained Friday that she would be "taking him to court" and said that she had called a lawyer but had not yet heard back. She said pursing legal action is "for the principle."

      "It don't matter if the judge give me the money back or not," she said.

      A member of MacInnis' family said that they would not comment, saying only that they plan to get a lawyer.

      Bernice Curley, chair of the Margaree Forks Chase the Ace committee, said she was floored.

      She said because there were two names on the winning ticket, she wrote a check for half of the winnings to each person, after checking with province's alcohol and gaming division "to make sure I was allowed to do that. They were perfectly fine with that, that it would make it easier for everyone involved. So I split the check evenly."

      "I can't really explain it. I didn't expect anything like that to happen," she said. "I just came to deliver the checks and present them to the winners.

      "I'm a little bit disappointed that happened at the end."

      Earlier Thursday morning, Curley said that there was a good crowd on hand for the big win.

      "The buzz was quite high," she said. 

      "Everyone was pretty excited to see what was going to happen. Since the jackpot got higher, every week the crowd got bigger."

      "I think people in the area got a little frustrated. They're not used to having traffic gridlocked in Margaree Forks, but it was short-lived and it was great to see so many people come to the area."

      The proceeds are being shared by the Margaree Volunteer Fire Department and North East Margaree Volunteer Fire Department, which are getting new fire trucks and possibly emergency response vehicles.

      "For a place that says there's no money, there was money coming into Margaree over the last few weeks. I'm not sure where, but everyone just wants a shot at it [the jackpot]," Curley said.

      She said she's been asked if she feels guilty about the money people are spending on tickets.

      "I'm not sure. I'm really not sure where that money comes from," Curley said.

      "I'm more of a believer that if you weren't giving it to us, you'd be giving it to some other gambling idea."

      Does Reddick have a case?

      Rob Currie, who teaches at the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, said the first thing that needs to be done is find out what rules and regulations are in place for this type of situation.

      This would require looking at the rules from the Alcohol, Gaming, Fuel and Tobacco Division of Service Nova Scotia, which handle games of chance such as Chase the Ace.

      He said there would also have to be evidence about what the terms of the agreement were; noting that an oral contract is "much dicier" than a written one.

      He added that, because this dispute is about more than $25,000, it is too large to be brought to small claims court and it could only be brought to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

      "It could cost tens of thousands of dollars to both sides and it could drag on for years," said Currie.

      He said there are many disputes known to Canadian law about lottery tickets, and his impression is that none of them end very well.

      Halifax-based lawer David Hutt, who was not representing Reddick when he spoke to local media on Friday, said that she "may" have a case, although he's waiting for more details.

      "It's a question of contract," Hutt said. "It's not really between her and the organizers of the event. It's actually between her and her nephew, and right now we're really scant on analysis."

      Hutt said that MacInnis' name being on the ticket would be evidence the court would consider, but how that's interpreted "depends on what the two discussed." He said it's also likely the court would consider whether there was an "oral, informal" contract between the two.

      "If it was just a gratuitous promise on her part, it's quite possible that she does have a case and (if) there is no contract, she should get the whole amount," Hutt said.

      Hutt emphasized that "we're really scant on details" and pointed out that he has yet to hear MacInnis' version of events. MacInnis has not yet commented publicly.

      "It's terribly sad and it suggests to me that more of us should formalize these agreements," Hutt said.

      Hutt suggested that Canadians who play the lottery together — including in office pools — should write down their contracts. The Atlantic Lottery Corporation provides a form that players can use to document their pool play.

      About Chase the Ace

      Chase the Ace is a form of lottery that has gained popularity since 2013 in parts of Canada as a way to raise funds for charities. It is also known as Crown the King and Jig the Joker.

      The jackpot accumulates from week-to-week until it is won, and the game is then over. Each week participants buy lottery tickets. The funds from ticket sales are divided into three parts. Typically the organizers keep 50%, the winner of the lottery takes 20% and 30% goes into the jackpot. The lottery winner also then draws a card from a deck of playing cards and wins the accumulated jackpot if the ace of spades is drawn. If not, the reduced deck is kept for the following week's game.

      VIDEO: Watch the aftermath of the jackpot award ceremony

      42JzlGzGNDEAunt threatens to sue nephew over lottery jackpotA woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.PT01M21Shttps://img.youtube.com/vi/42JzlGzGNDE/hqdefault.jpghttps://youtu.be/42JzlGzGNDE2018-07-14T09:09:00-05:00

      News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

      News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

      Thanks to dannyct for the tip.

      Some lawyer is going to win a jackpot!

        HollyGolightly's avatar - nw shadow.jpg
        Maryland
        United States
        Member #155031
        May 6, 2014
        411 Posts
        Offline

        Sad. Money is nothing compared to family that have your back

          sweetie7398's avatar - flower2
          100

          United States
          Member #22701
          September 30, 2005
          13313 Posts
          Offline

          Lawyer fees are not cheapWhat?

          Life, love, family Love

            Coin Toss's avatar - shape barbed.jpg
            100
            Zeta Reticuli Star System
            United States
            Member #30469
            January 17, 2006
            11497 Posts
            Offline

            The curse of the lottery, eh?

            Those who run the lotteries love it when players look for consistency in something that's designed not to have any. So many systems, so many theories, so few jackpot winners. 

            Lep

            There is one and only one 'proven' system, and that is to book the action. No matter the game, let the players pick their own losers.

              Perfecttiming2's avatar - redcross

              United States
              Member #65959
              October 11, 2008
              202 Posts
              Offline

              I think this is more like the curse of stupidity.

              If it is your ticket then your name should be the only name on it.....you do not invite someone else to add their name on a ticket that could possibly win!!!!.....You then gift the amount you plan to gift AFTER you win...

              I am curious as to why she had him purchase the tickets....Why didn’t she buy them herself...

              And her saying that she put his name on the ticket for “good luck” .....(you can fill in the blank on that one!)

                wander73's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                United States
                Member #153769
                March 24, 2014
                4721 Posts
                Offline

                I agree with everyone on this news topic.   They might as well hand the prize to the lawyer.   Case closed.

                I love pecans and making sales with commissions.   

                My amazon store is just like the lottery.

                  music*'s avatar - DiscoBallGlowing
                  USN United States Navy
                  Fresno, California
                  United States
                  Member #157851
                  August 2, 2014
                  3959 Posts
                  Offline

                  I agree with everyone on this news topic.   They might as well hand the prize to the lawyer.   Case closed.

                  I Agree!  I believe that Christians should not be suing other Christians. Do it only as a last resort and if violence is threatened. 

                  Boxing

                   "We are all in this together!" 

                    Avatar
                    ma
                    United States
                    Member #188577
                    March 15, 2018
                    57 Posts
                    Offline

                    never involve lawyers with anything. they should settle this themselves. 33.3% for him 66.7% for her seems fair since she made an error in judgement.

                      Raven62's avatar - binary
                      25
                      New Jersey
                      United States
                      Member #17842
                      June 28, 2005
                      130006 Posts
                      Offline

                      "she only wrote his name on the ticket for "Good Luck""

                      It must have worked!

                      What is the Cost of Good Luck?

                      Half of 1.2 Million!
                      Thud

                      A mind once stretched by a new idea never returns to its original dimensions!

                      Catch-22: A dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions.

                      Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges: When the republic is at its most corrupt the laws are most numerous.

                        wander73's avatar - Lottery-008.jpg

                        United States
                        Member #153769
                        March 24, 2014
                        4721 Posts
                        Offline

                        Worse comes to worse.   What if he disappears with the money,  takes care of himself,  gets a search warrant from the aunt who goes to court(SMH),   some of you are correct.  The lawyer.   Then the lawyer gets in place and starts charging $150- $500 per fee.   Lawyers aren't cheap either.  THen the tax payers get involved.  Wtf next?   

                         

                        I think both people weren't thinking and that is if he flees away some place else she isn't getting anything.

                        I love pecans and making sales with commissions.   

                        My amazon store is just like the lottery.

                          Original Bey's avatar - Lottery-022.jpg

                          Bahamas
                          Member #133458
                          September 30, 2012
                          6792 Posts
                          Offline

                          This story gave me a migraine. Do people watch cartoons all day and only look at the pictures in books? The level of stupidity cannot be explained.

                          "Do everything you can. Then, leave the rest to luck."

                            Avatar
                            Kentucky
                            United States
                            Member #32651
                            February 14, 2006
                            8965 Posts
                            Offline

                            Includes video report

                            A woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.

                            Barb Reddick and her nephew, Tyrone MacInnis, each received checks for $611,319.50 on Thursday after a $1,222,639 ticket with both their names on it was pulled Wednesday night at a Chase the Ace draw in Margaree, N.S.

                            Reddick surprised the organizers by telling the media soon afterward that she would be "taking (MacInnis) to court."

                            On Friday, Reddick explained that, although MacInnis purchased the ticket, she sent him $100 for tickets, and "told him to put his name on it for good luck." She says she only planned to give him $150,000 if he won.

                            "He bought other tickets and didn't put my name on it," she said.

                            "I'm not greedy," she went on. "If he would have won, I wouldn't have (gotten) nothing out of him," Reddick added.

                            Reddick said she will never speak with her nephew again "in this life or the next," adding, "He's dead to me. I don't want nothing to do with him."

                            Reddick maintained Friday that she would be "taking him to court" and said that she had called a lawyer but had not yet heard back. She said pursing legal action is "for the principle."

                            "It don't matter if the judge give me the money back or not," she said.

                            A member of MacInnis' family said that they would not comment, saying only that they plan to get a lawyer.

                            Bernice Curley, chair of the Margaree Forks Chase the Ace committee, said she was floored.

                            She said because there were two names on the winning ticket, she wrote a check for half of the winnings to each person, after checking with province's alcohol and gaming division "to make sure I was allowed to do that. They were perfectly fine with that, that it would make it easier for everyone involved. So I split the check evenly."

                            "I can't really explain it. I didn't expect anything like that to happen," she said. "I just came to deliver the checks and present them to the winners.

                            "I'm a little bit disappointed that happened at the end."

                            Earlier Thursday morning, Curley said that there was a good crowd on hand for the big win.

                            "The buzz was quite high," she said. 

                            "Everyone was pretty excited to see what was going to happen. Since the jackpot got higher, every week the crowd got bigger."

                            "I think people in the area got a little frustrated. They're not used to having traffic gridlocked in Margaree Forks, but it was short-lived and it was great to see so many people come to the area."

                            The proceeds are being shared by the Margaree Volunteer Fire Department and North East Margaree Volunteer Fire Department, which are getting new fire trucks and possibly emergency response vehicles.

                            "For a place that says there's no money, there was money coming into Margaree over the last few weeks. I'm not sure where, but everyone just wants a shot at it [the jackpot]," Curley said.

                            She said she's been asked if she feels guilty about the money people are spending on tickets.

                            "I'm not sure. I'm really not sure where that money comes from," Curley said.

                            "I'm more of a believer that if you weren't giving it to us, you'd be giving it to some other gambling idea."

                            Does Reddick have a case?

                            Rob Currie, who teaches at the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, said the first thing that needs to be done is find out what rules and regulations are in place for this type of situation.

                            This would require looking at the rules from the Alcohol, Gaming, Fuel and Tobacco Division of Service Nova Scotia, which handle games of chance such as Chase the Ace.

                            He said there would also have to be evidence about what the terms of the agreement were; noting that an oral contract is "much dicier" than a written one.

                            He added that, because this dispute is about more than $25,000, it is too large to be brought to small claims court and it could only be brought to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

                            "It could cost tens of thousands of dollars to both sides and it could drag on for years," said Currie.

                            He said there are many disputes known to Canadian law about lottery tickets, and his impression is that none of them end very well.

                            Halifax-based lawer David Hutt, who was not representing Reddick when he spoke to local media on Friday, said that she "may" have a case, although he's waiting for more details.

                            "It's a question of contract," Hutt said. "It's not really between her and the organizers of the event. It's actually between her and her nephew, and right now we're really scant on analysis."

                            Hutt said that MacInnis' name being on the ticket would be evidence the court would consider, but how that's interpreted "depends on what the two discussed." He said it's also likely the court would consider whether there was an "oral, informal" contract between the two.

                            "If it was just a gratuitous promise on her part, it's quite possible that she does have a case and (if) there is no contract, she should get the whole amount," Hutt said.

                            Hutt emphasized that "we're really scant on details" and pointed out that he has yet to hear MacInnis' version of events. MacInnis has not yet commented publicly.

                            "It's terribly sad and it suggests to me that more of us should formalize these agreements," Hutt said.

                            Hutt suggested that Canadians who play the lottery together — including in office pools — should write down their contracts. The Atlantic Lottery Corporation provides a form that players can use to document their pool play.

                            About Chase the Ace

                            Chase the Ace is a form of lottery that has gained popularity since 2013 in parts of Canada as a way to raise funds for charities. It is also known as Crown the King and Jig the Joker.

                            The jackpot accumulates from week-to-week until it is won, and the game is then over. Each week participants buy lottery tickets. The funds from ticket sales are divided into three parts. Typically the organizers keep 50%, the winner of the lottery takes 20% and 30% goes into the jackpot. The lottery winner also then draws a card from a deck of playing cards and wins the accumulated jackpot if the ace of spades is drawn. If not, the reduced deck is kept for the following week's game.

                            VIDEO: Watch the aftermath of the jackpot award ceremony

                            42JzlGzGNDEAunt threatens to sue nephew over lottery jackpotA woman awarded half of a $1.2 million lottery prize in Nova Scotia says her nephew is "dead" to her after he took half of the prize money, and that she only wrote his name on the ticket for "good luck." Meanwhile, at least one lawyer says she may have a case.PT01M21Shttps://img.youtube.com/vi/42JzlGzGNDE/hqdefault.jpghttps://youtu.be/42JzlGzGNDE2018-07-14T09:09:00-05:00

                            News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

                            News story photo(Click to display full-size in gallery)

                            Thanks to dannyct for the tip.

                            She said because there were two names on the winning ticket, she wrote a check for half of the winnings to each person, after checking with province's alcohol and gaming division "to make sure I was allowed to do that. They were perfectly fine with that, that it would make it easier for everyone involved. So I split the check evenly."

                            Why did Reddick wait until after they got their checks to say she should get all the money?

                            Hutt said that MacInnis' name being on the ticket would be evidence the court would consider, but how that's interpreted "depends on what the two discussed." He said it's also likely the court would consider whether there was an "oral, informal" contract between the two.

                            There are at least three sides to this story and we heard only two. The court will make their ruling after hearing from all sides. Bernice Curley, chair of the Margaree Forks Chase the Ace committee check with NS alcohol and gaming division before issuing the checks so it looks like she and the gaming division believe MacInnis should get half. And saying she added MacInnis' name to the ticket isn't going to help her case any.

                            Hopefully she'll get a good lawyer that will tell her the chances of winning might not be worth the cost of a lawsuit.